96

Assuming I want to ensure that myKey in { myKey: '' } only contains the strings foo, bar, baz, I could achieve this in two ways.

   // with a String Literal Type 
   type MyKeyType = 'foo' | 'bar' | 'baz';

    // or with a String Enum   
    enum MyKeyType {
       FOO = 'foo',
       BAR = 'bar',
       BAZ = 'baz'
    }

I wonder where the pros and cons of one over the other are, as both look the same to me (exept from the way I would access the values for e.g. a condition check).

The only difference I found in the TS documentation is that Enums are real objects at runtime, what might be desirable in some cases.

2
  • 1
    As of yet, I haven't found a case where enum worked better, more clearly or more safely than a string literal type. One advantage of string literals is that you can leverage generics with pick/keyof. I don't think you can do that with an enum.
    – msanford
    Apr 10 '18 at 20:02
  • 9
    One thing to consider is maintainability: if the values of the strings are subject to change then using a string-enum means only changing 1 string literal, whereas using a string-type means changing them everywhere they're used.
    – Dai
    Apr 10 '18 at 20:06
51

The key thing to understand is that the values of string enums are opaque.

The intended use case for a string enum is that you don't want other code to know or care what the literal string backing MyKeyType.FOO is. This means that you won't be able to, say, pass the literal string "bar" to a function accepting a MyKeyType -- you'll have to write MyKeyType.BAR instead.

2
  • 7
    So you would say there is no real difference in the way they act (they both achieve the same goal), but Enums give some extra abstraction that might be helpfull in later stages of a project e.g. for refactoring?
    – jowey
    Apr 10 '18 at 20:14
  • @jowey if you were building a component library for example you want to expose the literal string I think.
    – colemars
    Jul 31 '20 at 16:24
48

Well, there is a difference between string enums and literal types in the transpiled code.

Compare the Typescript Code

// with a String Literal Type 
type MyKeyType1 = 'foo' | 'bar' | 'baz';

// or with a String Enum   
enum MyKeyType2 {
   FOO = 'foo',
   BAR = 'bar',
   BAZ = 'baz'
}

With the transpiled JavaScript Code

// or with a String Enum   
var MyKeyType2;
(function (MyKeyType2) {
    MyKeyType2["FOO"] = "foo";
    MyKeyType2["BAR"] = "bar";
    MyKeyType2["BAZ"] = "baz";
})(MyKeyType2 || (MyKeyType2 = {}));

What you can see is, there is no generated code for the string literal. Because Typescripts Transpiler is only using for type safety while transpiling. At runtime string literals are "generated to dumb" strings. No references between the definition of the literal and the usages.

So there is a third alternative called const enum

Look at this

// with a String Literal Type 
type MyKeyType1 = 'foo' | 'bar' | 'baz';

// or with a String Enum   
enum MyKeyType2 {
   FOO = 'foo',
   BAR = 'bar',
   BAZ = 'baz'
}

// or with a Const String Enum   
const enum MyKeyType3 {
   FOO = 'foo',
   BAR = 'bar',
   BAZ = 'baz'
}

var a : MyKeyType1 = "bar" 
var b: MyKeyType2 = MyKeyType2.BAR
var c: MyKeyType3 = MyKeyType3.BAR

will be transpiled to

// or with a String Enum   
var MyKeyType2;
(function (MyKeyType2) {
    MyKeyType2["FOO"] = "foo";
    MyKeyType2["BAR"] = "bar";
    MyKeyType2["BAZ"] = "baz";
})(MyKeyType2 || (MyKeyType2 = {}));
var a = "bar";
var b = MyKeyType2.BAR;
var c = "bar" /* BAR */;

For further playing you can check this link

I prefer the const enum case, because of the convenient way of typing Enum.Value. Typescript will do the rest for me to get the highest performance when transpiling.

2
  • 2
    Thank you for the informative addition. I just wanted to remark that when using const enum you lose some of the capabilities of numeric enums or string enums (e.g. you can't loop them anymore). If you try nevertheless, the TS compiler complains 'const' enums can only be used in property or index access expressions or the right hand side of an import declaration or export assignment or type query. With your example it's obvious why this is the case.
    – jowey
    Apr 15 '20 at 20:20
  • 3
    just a little note about const enum: For transpiling TS with Babel, since version 7, we can't use const enum anymore. Until they fix it (github.com/babel/babel/issues/8741) you might see your project break when it gets migrated to newer builds systems. Note that babel7 over babel6 transpilation is close to twice as fast to compile TS so it's likely that most developpers would push for that migration and have to refactor all const enum to enums adding all that extra code in your production bundle.
    – zeachco
    Apr 21 '20 at 17:57
16

One benefit for an enum at development time is that you will see the list of options easily via intellisense:

enter image description here

Similarly, you could change an enum value easily using refactoring tools, instead of changing a string everywhere.

Edit: In VS 2017 and TypeScript >=3.2.4, intellisense works with string literal types:

enter image description here

2
  • 3
    good points and you answered my question in the comments of Ryans answer, but his gave me deeper understanding
    – jowey
    Apr 11 '18 at 9:25
  • Sure, I was only intending to supplement his answer :) Apr 11 '18 at 9:31
3

A big downside of enum is that if you use number instead of string, the entirely enum is not safety in my opinion: i can always assign any number value to a variable of this kind

enum TYPE {MAN = 1, WOMAN = 2, BOY = 3, GIRL = 4};
let foo: TYPE = TYPE.MAN;
foo = 37.14; //no problem for compiler
2
  • The fact that you can assign any value to the variable is something very important to notice. It's also kind of weird, why there isn't a compiler error?
    – Vencovsky
    Jan 17 at 23:36
  • 1
    This drawback seems to be intentional, to support bit flags - see answer here.
    – jowey
    Jan 19 at 20:48
1

One benefit by using enum instead of string literal is that you can use it also in places that you don't declare the types.

for example -

assert.equal(result.keyType, KeyType.FOO)

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