1

I am doing groklearning on python and I am trying to work out a problem as below:

You're familiar with the story of Hansel and Gretel, so when you decide to go exploring you always make sure to keep track of where you've come from. Since you know how unreliable leaving a trail of breadcrumbs is, you decide to write a program to help you map out your trail.

Your program should first read in the size of the grid that you will be exploring, and then read in directions: left, right, up or down. You always start exploring at the top left of your map. After every step, you should print out the trail, reading in directions until a blank line is entered. Your program should work like this:

the output should like this:

Grid size: 3
x..
...
...
Direction: right
xx.
...
...
Direction: down
xx.
.x.
...
Direction: right
xx.
.xx
...
Direction: 

My code is as below and I am stuck here. I am confused about how to find 'x' and how to change a specific neighbour of 'x'.

size = int(input('Grid size: '))
table = []
for i in range(size):
  row=[]
  for j in range(size):
    row.append('.')
  table.append(row)
table[0][0] = 'x'
for row in table:
  print(*row,sep='')

Direction = input('Direction: ')
while Direction:
  if Direction == 'right':
    for i in range(size):
      for j in range(size-1):
        if table[i][j] == 'x':
          table[i][j+1] = 'x'
          table[i-1][j+1] = '.'
        break
  elif Direction == 'down':
    for i in range(size):
      for j in range(size-1):
        if table[j][i] == 'x':
          table[j+1][i] = 'x'
          table[j+1][i-1] = '.'
        break
  Direction = input('Direction: ')
3
  • Are the directions guaranteed to be legal (i.e. will you never get a left or up as the first instructions or in general an instruction that would take you off the board)?
    – Graipher
    Apr 11, 2018 at 9:38
  • Also, you probably want to store the current position and update it according to the received command. Then you only need to add a 'x' at your new current position.
    – Graipher
    Apr 11, 2018 at 9:40
  • 1
    the directions will never be directed off the edges of the map
    – Yikai
    Apr 11, 2018 at 9:42

3 Answers 3

4

Essentially, you want to carry around some state, i.e. the position you currently inhabit, and the state of the board, and you want to perform actions on this encapsulated state. This is a perfect use-case for a class. Here's a quick and dirty implementation.

class Grid:
    def __init__(self, size):
        self.data = [['.']*size for _ in range(size)]
        self.size = size
        self.x = 0
        self.y = 0
        self.data[0][0] = 'x'
    def right(self):
        self.x = min(self.x + 1, self.size - 1)
        self.mark_position()
    def left(self):
        self.x = max(self.x - 1, 0)
        self.mark_position()
    def up(self):
        self.y = max(self.y - 1, 0)
        self.mark_position()
    def down(self):
        self.y = min(self.y + 1, self.size - 1)
        self.mark_position()
    def mark_position(self):
        self.data[self.y][self.x] = 'x'
    def __str__(self):
        return '\n'.join([''.join(sub) for sub in self.data])

Note, our origin (0,0) is at the top left. A stumbling block: list-of-lists is a natural way to store this data, but the first "dimension" of the list picks the "row", and the second dimension picks the "column", so "x" and "y" are reversed in the sense that data[0][1] is the first row, second column, i.e. 0 in the y, 1 in the x. Also note, I implemented logic to not allow you to go past the grid boundary (with min and max truncating for you), but you other possibilities would be to make that throw an error, or you could have the world wrap around. Try to implement that yourself once you grok this approach.

To test it out:

In [2]: grid = Grid(3)

In [3]: print(grid)
x..
...
...

In [4]: grid.right()

In [5]: print(grid)
xx.
...
...

In [6]: grid.down()

In [7]: print(grid)
xx.
.x.
...

In [8]: grid.right()

In [9]: print(grid)
xx.
.xx
...

Note, you don't have to use a class, but then you might need to do a lot of repetitive argument passing, i.e. passing the state around as arguments. Here I did a very literal translation to a more procedural approach to highlight the relationship between the two. Note, I make copies of the data just to be safe, since there is state all over the place and mutating global state is a good way to introduce bugs into your program. Otherwise, this is a perhaps too literal translation of the class.

def initialize_game_state(size):
    data = [['.']*size for _ in range(size)]
    x = 0
    y = 0
    data[0][0] = 'x'
    return data, x, y

def right(data, x, y):
    new_x = min(x + 1, len(data) - 1)
    new_data = mark_position(data, new_x, y)
    return new_data, new_x, y

def left(data, x, y):
    new_x = max(x - 1, 0)
    new_data = mark_position(data, new_x, y)
    return new_data, new_x, y

def up(data, x, y):
    new_y = max(y - 1, 0)
    new_data = mark_position(data, x, new_y)
    return new_data, x, new_y

def down(data, x, y):
    new_y = min(y + 1, len(data) - 1)
    new_data = mark_position(data, x, new_y)
    return new_data, x, new_y

def mark_position(data, x, y):
    data_copy = [sub.copy() for sub in data]
    data_copy[y][x] = 'x'
    return data_copy

def grid_to_string(data):
    return '\n'.join([''.join(sub) for sub in data])
1
  • @Yikai there was a minor bug that could have caused that in the first version I posted. Try the edited one. Apr 11, 2018 at 10:42
1

I believe this code should work properly:

size = int(input('Grid size: '))
table = []
position = [0,0]

def print_map(table):
    for row in table:
        print(*row, sep="")

for i in range(size):
    row = []
    for j in range(size):
        row.append('.')
    table.append(row)
table[position[0]][position[1]] = 'x'
print_map(table)

Direction = input('Direction: ')
while Direction:
    if Direction == 'right':
        position[1] += 1
        table[position[0]][position[1]] = "x"

    elif Direction == 'left':
        position[1] -= 1
        table[position[0]][position[1]] = "x"

    elif Direction == 'up':
        position[0] -= 1
        table[position[0]][position[1]] = "x"

    elif Direction == 'down':
        position[0] += 1
        table[position[0]][position[1]] = "x"

    print_map(table)
    Direction = input('Direction: ')
0
size = int(input('Grid size: '))
table = []
position = [0,0]


def print_map(table):
    for row in table:
        print(*row, sep="")


# Initialize table
for i in range(size):
    row = []
    for j in range(size):
        row.append('.')
    table.append(row)
table[position[0]][position[1]] = 'x'
print_map(table)

Direction = input('Direction: ')
while Direction:
    if Direction == 'right':
        position[1] += 1
        table[position[0]][position[1]] = "x"

    elif Direction == 'down':
        position[0] += 1
        table[position[0]][position[1]] = "x"

    print_map(table)
    Direction = input('Direction: ')

You just need to add a variable to keep track of the current position and update this depending on the directions given. You can then use this variable to update the table.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.