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this is my first question on Stackflow so I apologise in advance if I haven’t formatted it well. My problem is as follow: I have the following list of nested dictionaries/lists and what I want to do is create a new parent (L0) category called "food" and shift all the value in the fruits and veg dictionaries one step down (so that L0: fruit becomes L1: fruit, L1: banana becomes L2 :banana)...

D = [{
        "L0": "fruit",
        "L1_list": [
            {
                "L1": "banana"
            },
            {
                "L1": "apple", 
                "L2_list": [
                    {
                        "L2": "Green apple"
                    }, 
                    {
                        "L2": "Red apple"
                    }
                ]
            }, 
            {
                "L1": "kiwi"
            }
        ]
    },
    {
        "L0": "vegs", 
        "L1_list": [
            {
                "L1": "potato"
            }, 
            {
                "L1": "carrot"
            }
        ]
    }]

The excepted output should look like this:

Expected_output = [
    {
        "L0": "food",
        "L1_list": [
            {
                "L1": "fruit",
                "L2_list": [
                    {
                        "L2": "banana"
                    },
                    {
                        "L2": "apple",
                        "L3_list": [
                            {
                                "L3": "Green apple"
                            },
                            {
                                "L3": "Redapple"
                            }
                        ]
                    },
                    {
                        "L2": "kiwi"
                    }
                ]
            },
            {
                "L1": "vegs",
                "L2_list": [
                    {
                        "L2": "potato"
                    },
                    {
                        "L2": "carrot"
                    }
                ]
            }
        ]
    }
]

Now, because my dictionaries can vary in size and how deep they can go I need a programmatic solution. So I thought I would create a function that iterates itself over and over till it reaches the end of the tree. As the function reaches the end of a particular branch it would add 1 to the key (L0 --> L1, L1_list --> L2_list). Although the process does indeed shift everything one level down, I can't figure out how to rebuild the initial structure. In particular, I can't bring the children back into their respective list.

Final_list =[]
def digger(list_to_dig):
    import re
    for x in list_to_dig:
        for k,v in x.items():
            if isinstance (v,list):
                print("keep digging")
                digger(v)
            elif isinstance (x,dict):
                new_D = {}
                new_k = "L"+str(int(re.sub("L","",k))+1)
                new_D[new_k]=v
                temp = re.sub("L","",k)
                new_child_list = "L"+str(int(re.sub("_list","",temp))+2)+"_list"
                new_D[new_child_list]=""
                Final_list.append(new_D)
            else:
                print("no dictionary avail")
                pass
    print("_________")
    print(Final_list)
    print("_________")

    test = digger(D)

Any suggestions on how I should tackle this? Many thanks

Following the suggestion of @running.t I have tried to use the pop function. However, because it takes place within an iteration, it pops the old key, creates and inserts the new one, but on the next iteration will take the new key just created, pops it, and creates and inserts a new new key, and so on (although it doesn't go into an infinite loop either). Here is a simplified example to illustrate the problem:

Step 1 create new top level dict

new_top_level = {"L0":"Food"}
new_dict ={}
for k,v in new_top_level.items():
    lst_k = "L"+str(int(re.sub("L","",ka))+1)+"_list"
    new_dict[k]=v
    new_dict[lst_k]=[]

Step 2 add the old tree in the new list

old_d = {'L0': 'Fruit', 'L1_list': [{'L1': 'Green apple'}, {'L1': 'Red apple'}]}
new_dict[lst_k].append(old_d)

Step 3 add 1 to all the keys of the old tree

def digger(list_to_update):
    import re
    pattern1 = r"L.$"
    pattern2 = r"L._list"
    for x in list_to_update:
        for k1,v1 in x.items():
            if re.match(pattern1,k1):
                new_k1 = "L"+str(int(re.sub("L","",k1))+1)
                x[new_k1]= x.pop(k1)
            elif re.match(pattern2,k1):
                temp = re.sub("L","",k1)
                new_k1 = "L"+str(int(re.sub("_list","",temp))+1)+"_list"
                x[new_k1]= x.pop(k1)
                digger(v1)

test = digger(new_dict[lst_k]) 
  • Where do you get that initial dictionary from? Did you build it yourself? – Igle Apr 11 '18 at 12:10
  • yes, I built that particular dictionary manually. In the final solution though, it will be built via a UI by the end user – Intel_code Apr 11 '18 at 13:05
0

You should not create new list and put everything into it. And actually this is what you're doing in line:

Final_list.append(new_D)

What you should do instead is to recursively iterate all dictionaries and lists you have (the same way you do it currently) and if object is a dict rename all keys in that dict accordingly.

Here you can find how to rename keys i dict. I think the best answer there suggest using following:

new_k = "L"+str(int(re.sub("L","",k))+1) 
x[new_key] = x.pop(k)

And finally, after finishing digging all D your should put modified D inside new Expected_output list.

  • Thanks! very useful. I am not familiar with the pop function but will look into it and let you know how it goes – Intel_code Apr 11 '18 at 12:45

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