12

Should a shared pointer be passed by reference or by value as a parameter to a class if it is going to be copied to a member variable?

The copying of the shared pointer will increment the refrence count and I don't want to make any unnecessary copies and thus ref count increments. Will passing the shared pointer as a refrence solve this? I assume it does but are there any other problems with this?

Passing by value:

class Boo {
public: 
    Boo() { }
};

class Foo {
public:
    Foo(std::shared_ptr<Boo> boo) 
        : m_Boo(boo) {}
private:
    std::shared_ptr<Boo> m_Boo;
};

int main() {
    std::shared_ptr<Boo> boo = std::make_shared<Boo>();

    Foo foo(boo);
}

Passing by refrence:

class Boo {
public: 
    Boo() { }
};

class Foo {
public:
    Foo(std::shared_ptr<Boo>& boo) 
        : m_Boo(boo) {}
private:
    std::shared_ptr<Boo> m_Boo;
};

int main() {
    std::shared_ptr<Boo> boo = std::make_shared<Boo>();

    Foo foo(boo);
}
2
  • 3
    In most cases, you should not use smart pointers as parameters at all; there are some exceptions, though, and your example is one of these. I recommend having a look at Herb Sutter's GotW 91 for getting some general info about...
    – Aconcagua
    Apr 11, 2018 at 13:35
  • @Aconcagua The reason I need to store a shared pointer to an object is to make sure that it's not destroyed before the objects that need it are. But thank you for the article.
    – Signekatt
    Apr 11, 2018 at 14:01

2 Answers 2

21

Pass it by value then move it into the member:

class Foo {
public:
    Foo(std::shared_ptr<Boo> boo) 
        : m_Boo(std::move(boo)) {}
private:
    std::shared_ptr<Boo> m_Boo;
};

This will be the most efficient in all cases - if the caller has a rvalue-reference then there wont be a single add-ref, if the caller has a value there'll be a single add-ref.

If you pass by const& you force an add-ref even in cases where its unnecessary. If you pass by value and then set without a std::move you may get 2 add-refs.

Edit: This is a good pattern to use if you've got a class where a move is significantly cheaper than a copy, and you have a function call which will always copy the instance passed in - as in this case. You force the copy to happen at the function call boundary by taking it by value, and then if the caller has a rvalue reference the copy need never happen at all - it will be moved instead.

1
  • 5
    Nevertheless, even a move is not free. For the simple function std::shared_ptr<int> foo(std::shared_ptr<int> arg) { return std::move(arg); }, g++ generates six memory accesses: Two to read the argument, two to null the argument, and two to construct the result. That's rather heavy on the memory bus (the CPU will be twiddlings its thumbs in the mean time). Of course, the move (local cache operation) is cheaper than bumping an atomic ref count (which has inter-CPU overheads), so this use of moving is very ok. Nevertheless, there are cases where passing by const & is faster than moving. Apr 11, 2018 at 14:02
-3

shared_ptr should be treated just like any other class when passing to functions. in this case you should pass to const reference.

why i wrote why i wrote Herb Sutter jump to min 21:50 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xnqTKD8uD64

7
  • If the shared_ptr is passed as a const reference, the constructor will be unable to participate with the shared ownership of the object, thus defeating the entire point.
    – Eljay
    Apr 11, 2018 at 14:03
  • the constructor will be able to take ownership if and the ref count will be 2 in this case. but now i understand that when you always want to take ownership it is better to accept by value. Apr 11, 2018 at 14:05
  • 1
    @Eljay I don't know, what you are talking about: With a const & argument, the object is guaranteed to persist as long as the function is executing. And the constructor is free to copy-construct its own shared_ptr<> from it to take part in the ownership. Apr 11, 2018 at 14:07
  • 1
    As a matter of fact, I do not understand the downvotes on this answer: Passing by const & is not exactly wrong, and it has been the best answer for a long time. And there are still cases where const & passing beats move constructing any time. I wouldn't upvote this answer because move constructing is usually better, but downvoting it seems a bit unfair to me. Apr 11, 2018 at 14:10
  • 1
    @MikeVine The case where const & is better is this: Some object is an owner of some instance of Boo via a shared_ptr<>, and is asked to generate a Foo that references the same instance. Passing by value and moving means a) constructing a shared_ptr<> to be passed to the constructor, b) moving that argument over to the member variable. Passing by const & means a) passing a pointer to the existing shared_ptr<> to the constructor, b) constructing the member variable directly from the original shared_ptr<>. Passing a single pointer is definitely faster than moving a shared_ptr<>. Apr 11, 2018 at 16:16

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