I am just starting looking at network analysis and wanted to begin by creating a data.frame of how often basketball players on a team have started together

Ideally, I would like to incorporate map functions from purrr

So with this as input

game_1 <- c("Andy","Bob","Chris","Doug","Evan") 
game_2 <- c("Andy","Chris","Evan","Fred","George")  

I would want a result like this

n_1  n_2 games

Andy  Bob    1
Andy  Chris  2
Andy  Doug   1
Andy  Evan   2
Andy  Fred   1
Andy  George 1
Bob   Chris  1
Bob   Doug   1
Bob   Evan   1
Chris Doug   1
Chris Evan   2
Chris Fred   1
Chris George 1
Doug  Evan   1
Evan  Fred   1
Evan  George 1
Fred  George 1
  • expand.grid(game_1,game_2) could be a potential starting point. – Andre Elrico Apr 11 at 16:22
up vote 2 down vote accepted

My solution does not use purrr, but it should work

game_1 <- c("Andy","Bob","Chris","Doug","Evan") 
game_2 <- c("Andy","Chris","Evan","Fred","George")

# Combine all games into a single list for use with lapply
all_games <- list(game_1, game_2)

library(dplyr)

# Find combinations, sorted to ensure the earlier alphabets are in the first column
df <- do.call(rbind, lapply(all_games, function(x) { data.frame(t(combn(sort(x), 2)))  })) 

# Calculate the number of instances where 2 players appear with each other
df %>% group_by(X1, X2) %>% summarise(count = n())
# A tibble: 17 x 3
# Groups:   X1 [?]
# X1     X2 count
# <fctr> <fctr> <int>
#   1   Andy    Bob     1
# 2   Andy  Chris     2
# 3   Andy   Doug     1
# 4   Andy   Evan     2
# 5   Andy   Fred     1
# 6   Andy George     1
# 7    Bob  Chris     1
# 8    Bob   Doug     1
# 9    Bob   Evan     1
# 10  Chris   Doug     1
# 11  Chris   Evan     2
# 12  Chris   Fred     1
# 13  Chris George     1
# 14   Doug   Evan     1
# 15   Evan   Fred     1
# 16   Evan George     1
# 17   Fred George     1
  • that's some pro stuff right here! – Andre Elrico Apr 11 at 16:25
  • @whalea Thanks for quick response. That actually has duplicates e.g Andy Bob & Bob Andy both appear. Is there a quick adaptation to cater for that – pssguy Apr 11 at 16:30
  • @pssguy thanks for pointing out the duplicates, I have changed the function inside lapply to use combn instead which should solve the problem. Note the importance of using sort for this method to work – whalea Apr 11 at 16:57
  • 1
    @whalea. Looks good. I can prob adapt further if I want to. Used it for real life situation and only took 15secs for 1000 games of soccer lineups (so 11 rather than 5) – pssguy Apr 11 at 18:09
library(dplyr)

# get combinations from game_1
g1 <- combn(game_1, 2) %>% t 

# get combinations from game_2
g2 <- combn(game_2, 2) %>% t 

# bind both in a dataframe and count pairs
g1 %>% 
  rbind.data.frame(g2) %>% 
  group_by(V1, V2) %>% 
  summarise(games = n())

# A tibble: 17 x 3
# Groups:   V1 [?]
       V1     V2 games
   <fctr> <fctr> <int>
 1   Andy    Bob     1
 2   Andy  Chris     2
 3   Andy   Doug     1
 4   Andy   Evan     2
 5   Andy   Fred     1
 6   Andy George     1
 7    Bob  Chris     1
 8    Bob   Doug     1
 9    Bob   Evan     1
10  Chris   Doug     1
11  Chris   Evan     2
12  Chris   Fred     1
13  Chris George     1
14   Doug   Evan     1
15   Evan   Fred     1
16   Evan George     1
17   Fred George     1

building on whalea's answer:

game_1 <- c("Andy","Bob","Chris","Doug","Evan") 
game_2 <- c("Andy","Chris","Evan","Fred","George")

all_games <- list(game_1, game_2)

library(dplyr)
df <- do.call(rbind, lapply(all_games, function(x) { expand.grid(x, x) %>% filter(Var1 != Var2) })) %>% apply(1,sort) %>% t %>% data.frame
df %>% group_by(X1, X2) %>% summarise(count = n()/2)

result:

 1 Andy  Bob       1.
 2 Andy  Chris     2.
 3 Andy  Doug      1.
 4 Andy  Evan      2.
 5 Andy  Fred      1.
 6 Andy  George    1.
 7 Bob   Chris     1.
 8 Bob   Doug      1.
 9 Bob   Evan      1.
10 Chris Doug      1.
11 Chris Evan      2.
12 Chris Fred      1.
13 Chris George    1.
14 Doug  Evan      1.
15 Evan  Fred      1.
16 Evan  George    1.
17 Fred  George    1.

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