While I'm using linked_list to make a small game. I have a class call card

class card
{
public:
    int number;
    int suit;
    static int uniquenumber;
    card();
    void showcard();
    card * next;
};

Then for the following linked_list structure, I want to add the card to the front of the linked_list.

void collection::add(card a)
{
    card *temp = new card(a);
    temp->next = start;
    start = temp;
}

But I can't get the result I want. Also, there have another function need to remove a card from the front of the linked_list, and return the card. I have no idea how to return a node from linked_list.

card collection::deal(){
card *temp = start->next;
start->next = nullptr;
start = temp;
return start;
}

This way will just return me an error saying "can't convert "card *" to "card" "

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Adding

Time for a walk-through:

void collection::add(card a) // pass by value. a is a copy 
{
    card *temp = new card(a); // makes a dynamically allocated copy of the copy.
    temp->next = start; // looks right
    start = temp; // looks right
}

There is nothing explicitly wrong in this function, but if you want

myCollection.add(mycard);

and then expect to use mycard as though it is in myCollection, you are out of luck. A copy of mycard is in mycollection. We can make slight improvements to reduce the amount of copying,

void collection::add(const card & a) // pass by reference. a is the source. One less copy
                                     // Look up const correctness for more information 
                                     // on the use of const here 
{
    card *temp = new card(a); // makes a dynamically allocated copy of the copy.
    temp->next = start; 
    start = temp;
}

but if you want mycard to be in the list rather than a copty of it, you need to do things very differently

void collection::add(card * a) // pass by reference via a pointer
{
    a->next = start;
    start = a;
}

and use it something like:

card * mycard = new card()
// set members of *mycard. Or better, make a smarter constructor to set them for you
myCollection.add(mycard);

Removal

card collection::deal(){
    card *temp = start->next; //temp points to the second item on the list
    start->next = nullptr; // cur off start from the rest of the list
    start = temp; // whups! Just lost the first item in the list
    return start; // start is a pointer. The return type is not. Need to dereference
}

Fix one: deference the pointer to return it.

card collection::deal(){
    card *temp = start->next; 
    start->next = nullptr; 
    start = temp; 
    return *start; // returns a copy of the second card in the list
}

Next fix: return the correct card

card collection::deal(){
    card *temp = start; //temp points to the first item on the list
    start = start->next; // advance start to second item on the list
    temp->next = nullptr; // cut former first item off from from the list
    return *temp; // returns a copy of the former first item. But what of temp?
}

Next fix: temp was leaked. No one points to it and the memory was never freed.

card collection::deal(){
    card *temp = start; 
    start = start->next; 
    temp->next = nullptr; 
    card rval(*temp); // copy former first node
    delete temp; // free former first node
    return rval; // return copy.
}

You could also return a pointer to the item removed and leave freeing it to the caller. This is a bit dodgy.

card * collection::deal(){
    card *temp = start; //temp points to the first item on the list
    start = start->next; // advance start to second item on the list
    temp->next = nullptr; // cut former first item off from from the list
    return temp; // returns former first item 
}

Look into std::unique_ptr as a tool to ensure that returned card pointers are released by the caller.

Another possibility is to separate the linked list from the card This way collection's users only see cards and have no clue how the cards are stored inside collection.

  • In the first rewrite of add(), why do you pass argument by non-const ref? – bipll Apr 11 at 20:26
  • Thanks for the fix, Remy. @bipll I didn't want to open up another can of worms explaining the whys and hows of something tangential. I felt like I already had too much going on, so I just left a comment with a key term an asker could look up if they were interested. – user4581301 Apr 11 at 20:43
  • And on second thought, you're right @bipll . The explanation can go either way, so it's probably better that I use const and recommend they look up why on their own. – user4581301 Apr 11 at 20:49

Your add() looks fine, but your deal() is all wrong. It should look more like this instead:

card collection::deal()
{
    if (!start) throw std::runtime_error("deck is empty!");
    card *temp = start;
    start = temp->next;
    card theCard = *temp;
    c.next = nullptr;
    delete temp;
    return theCard;
}

You can simplify the code a bit by using some more creative coding, eg:

class card
{
public:
    int number;
    int suit;
    card * next;

    static int uniquenumber;

    card();
    card(const card &src, card *n = nullptr);
    card& operator=(const card &rhs);

    void showcard();
};

#include <memory>

card::card()
    : number(0), suit(0), next(nullptr)
{
}

card::card(const card &src, card *n)
    : number(src.number), suit(src.suit), next(n)
{
}

card& card::operator=(const card &rhs)
{
    if (&rhs != this)
    {
        number = rhs.number;
        suit = rhs.suit;
        // don't copy 'next'!
        next = nullptr;
    }
    return *this;
}

void collection::add(const card &a)
{
    start = new card(a, start);
}

card collection::deal()
{
    if (!start) throw std::runtime_error("deck is empty!");
    std::unique_ptr<card> temp(start);
    start = start->next;
    return *temp;
}

But, that being said, from a design perspective, card really should not have a next member at all. You should separate card from the implementation of the linked list (which would, in turn, allow you to change the implementation of the list at a later time without having to change card to match). You want a list that contains card objects, not a list that is card objects.

You should use std::list for that separation, eg:

#include <list>

class card
{
public:
    int number;
    int suit;

    static int uniquenumber;

    card();
    void showcard();
};

class collection
{
private:
    std::list<card> cards;

public:
    void add(const card &a);
    card deal();
};

void collection::add(const card &a)
{
    cards.push_front(a);
}

card collection::deal()
{
    if (cards.empty()) throw std::runtime_error("deck is empty!");
    card theCard = cards.front();
    cards.pop_front();
    return theCard;
}

But, if you can't use std::list, then you can use something more like this:

class card
{
public:
    int number;
    int suit;

    static int uniquenumber;

    card();
    void showcard();
};

class collection
{
private:
    struct collectionItem
    {
        card theCard;
        collectionItem *next;

        collectionItem(const card &a, collectionItem *n);
    };

    collectionItem *start;

public:
    collection();
    ~collection();

    void add(const card &a);
    card deal();
};

#include <memory>

collection::collection()
    : start(nullptr)
{
}

collection::collectionItem::collectionItem(const card &a, collectionItem *n)
    : theCard(a), next(n)
{
}

collection::~collection()
{
    collectionItem *item = start;
    while (item)
        item = std::unique_ptr<collectionItem>(item)->next;
}

void collection::add(const card &a)
{
    start = new collectionItem(a, start);
}

card collection::deal()
{
    if (!start) throw std::runtime_error("deck is empty!");
    std::unique_ptr<collectionItem> temp(start);
    start = temp->next;
    return temp->theCard;
}

If you have the pointer variable, you can get the actual value referenced by the pointer dereferencing the pointer.

try return *start;

  • This won't satisfy the requirements given: "remove a card from the front of the linked_list, and return the card". If you just return the dereferenced pointer, you aren't removing the card from the list. If you remove the card from the list, you still have to destroy it, so you can't dereference it and destroy it at the same time. You would have to make a copy of the card, destroy the card in the list, and then return the copy. – Remy Lebeau Apr 11 at 19:42

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