I have a Canvas component, which looks approximately like this:

class Canvas extends React.Component{

    saveRef = node => {
        this._canvas = node;
    }
    
    shouldComponentUpdate(){
        /*I will never re-render this component*/
        return false;
    }
    
    componentWillReceiveProps( nextProps ){
        /*Here I do manipulations with this._ctx, when new props come*/
    }
    
    render(){
        return (
            <canvas ref={this.saveRef} />
        );
    }
    
    componentDidMount(){
        this._ctx = this._canvas.getContext( "2d" );
    }
}
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react-dom.min.js"></script>

React community began to deprecate componentWillReceiveProps in order to replace it with getDerivedStateFromProps. I can use componentDidUpdate to perform my drawings, but then I need to remove shouldComponentUpdate and I will have a lot of useless render calls. What is the correct performant way to update my component in react 16.3, when new props come?

  • Can Canvas component provides some methods to handle the job to draw, and the one knows when should it updates is its parent component. So Canvas component never update until the parent does call it. Will this work for you? – theJian Apr 12 at 2:10
  • Yes, this is one of the options, but it has two cons: firstly, if Canvas component is connected to redux, it depends on store updates, not on parent, and secondly, you should move update logic to other component. Is there a way to handle new props without re-rendering component? This situation may happen not only with canvas element. For example your component renders 6 containers, which are connected to redux. In this case component also doesn't need to re-render. – Alex Fomin Apr 12 at 10:49
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Use componentDidUpdate for DOM manipulations like this. A shouldComponentUpdate won’t really make a difference for a component with a single child that always has the same props. So you should be able to remove it without a significant difference in performance.

If you've profiled the application and determined that in this particular case it does make a difference, you can hoist the element into constructor.

This way React will skip over it completely (which effectively works the same way as shouldComponentUpdate):

class Canvas extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this._ctx = null;
    this._child = <canvas ref={node => {
      this._ctx = node ? node.getContext('2d') : null
    } />;
  }

  componentDidUpdate(prevProps){
    // Manipulate this._ctx here
  }

  render() {
    // A constant element tells React to never re-render
    return this._child;
  }
}

You could also split it into two components:

class Canvas extends React.Component {
  saveContext = ctx => {
    this._ctx = ctx;
  }

  componentDidUpdate(prevProps){
    // Manipulate this._ctx here
  }

  render() {
    return <PureCanvas contextRef={this.saveContext} />;
  }
}


class PureCanvas extends React.Component {
  shouldComponentUpdate() {
    return false;
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <canvas
        ref={node => node ? this.props.contextRef(node.getContext('2d') : null)}
      />;
  }
}
  • 2
    Thank you! It completely solved my problem! – Alex Fomin Apr 12 at 18:11

I found this because I had a sort of similar problem but not completely the same. The solution that works for me is just to put all the relevant code in shouldComponentUpdate:

(the if statement used to be in componentWillReceiveProps)

  shouldComponentUpdate (nextProps, nextState) { // no more random renders
    if (
      (nextProps.nightMode !== this.props.nightMode) ||
      (nextProps.language  !== this.props.language)
    ) {
      this.props.setRefresh(true)                       // setTimeout means after current operation
      setTimeout(() => this.props.setRefresh(false), 1) // so loading will show for longer than 1ms
    }

    return this.props.refresh !== nextProps.refresh
  }

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