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I am using EF Core Code first and I have an issue when using multiple DB providers (SQL Server and MySql). Even when I choose to use MySql DB provider, SQL server migration files are used.

Check the sample project

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In my case, I use the same migration for both providers but sometimes I need to do some changes to migration files manually. for example added annotation for both providers (or change the type of some fields like varchar to nvarchar).

Id = table.Column<int>(nullable: false)
           .Annotation("MySql:ValueGeneratedOnAdd", true)
           .Annotation("SqlServer:ValueGenerationStrategy", SqlServerValueGenerationStrategy.IdentityColumn),

For me it's work fine

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  • I dont want to use this approach. Having two migration-sets is much more clean. – pantonis Apr 12 '18 at 9:41
  • @pantonis you are right, it is only one more approach which someone can use – Taras Kovalenko Apr 12 '18 at 9:43
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Writing provider-specific migrations, database initializers, and services with Entity Framework core can be a difficult task. Use AdaptiveClient to greatly simplify the process. AdaptiveClient is a utility that works with Autofac for provisioning a service layer against multiple database providers or transports. AdaptiveClient.EntityFrameworkCore is an add-on that includes utilities for working with Entity Framework Core. In a nutshell here is how it AdaptiveClient works:

IMigrationContext is a placeholder interface that allows you to associate your DbContext with a specific provider (MSSQL, MySql, etc) for the purpose of creating a migration. IDbContextOptions is a placeholder interface that allows you to associate an implementation of DbContextOptions that is specific to your provider. RegistrationHelper is a utility that simplifies registering your components with Autofac. RegisterMigrationContext is a method you can call to easily register your provider-specific migration context.

To create provider-specific migrations you create a class for each database provider you want to target. These classes derive from your DbContext and implement IMigrationContext (which has no members):

public class MyDbContext_MSSQL : MyDbContext, IMigrationContext
{
    public MyDbContext_MSSQL(DbContextOptions options) : base(options)
    {

    }
}   


public class MyDbContext_MySQL : MyDbContext, IMigrationContext
{
    public MyDbContext_MySQL(DbContextOptions options) : base(options)
    {

    }
}

The examples above are complete - you do not have to write any additional code. You do not need to create a separate DbContext for each provider (unless you wish to do so). The reason you need to create a class for each provider is because EF reflects on your assembly to find the correct DbContext when you run dotnet ef migrations add....

Create classes that wrap DbContextOptions and implement IDbContextOptions:

public class DbContextOptions_MSSQL : IDbContextOptions
{
    public DbContextOptions Options { get; set; }

    public DbContextOptions_MSSQL(string connectionString)
    {
        DbContextOptionsBuilder builder = new DbContextOptionsBuilder();
        builder.UseSqlServer(connectionString);
        Options = builder.Options;
    }
}


public class DbContextOptions_MySQL : IDbContextOptions
{
    public DbContextOptions Options { get; set; }

    public DbContextOptions_MySQL(string connectionString)
    {
        DbContextOptionsBuilder builder = new DbContextOptionsBuilder();
        builder.UseMySql(connectionString);
        Options = builder.Options;
    }
}

Use the AdaptiveClient RegistrationHelper to register your classes with Autofac:

registrationHelper.RegisterMigrationContext<Database.Db_MSSQL>(API_Name.MyAPI, DataBaseProviderName.MSSQL);
registrationHelper.RegisterMigrationContext<Database.Db_MySQL>(API_Name.MyAPI, DataBaseProviderName.MySQL);

registrationHelper.RegisterDbContextOptions<DbContextOptions_MSSQL>(DataBaseProviderName.MSSQL);
registrationHelper.RegisterDbContextOptions<DbContextOptions_MySQL>(DataBaseProviderName.MySQL);    

In the code above API_Name is just a constant that resolves to a simple string like "MyApplicationName". Same with DataBaseProviderName.MSSQL and .MySQL. They are string constants that resolve to "MSSQL" or "MySQL".

Now, here is the most important part: Just as you register the components of your application using keys such as "MSSQL" or "MySQL", you also register the connection strings for your application using those same constants.

This allows Autofac to resolve the correct provider-specific or transport-specific components based on nothing more than the connection string currently in use for application. You can read up on the entire process here.

You can see the complete working example in the Zamagon Demo. The demo illustrates migrations, database initializers, and drop-and-recreate scenarios for integration testing.

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