43

I know that If I run this query

select top 100 * from mytable order by newid()

it will get 100 random records from my table.

However, I'm a bit confused as to how it works, since I don't see newid() in the select list. Can someone explain? Is there something special about newid() here?

4
  • Note that this is a slow way to get 100 random entries unless the db server recognizes this as a known pattern to optimize. Feb 12, 2011 at 18:37
  • It's also only pseudo-random. If you need true randomness for security, never use this method. Feb 12, 2011 at 18:40
  • 2
    The columns in your ORDER BY clause do not need to appear in your SELECT clause in SQL Server.
    – Gabe
    Feb 12, 2011 at 18:51
  • 1
    You should also be wary when using this technique on large tables as it will use tempdb as mentioned in this article, which does offer an alternative method.
    – domager
    Apr 25, 2013 at 13:40

6 Answers 6

34

I know what NewID() does, I'm just trying to understand how it would help in the random selection. Is it that (1) the select statement will select EVERYTHING from mytable, (2) for each row selected, tack on a uniqueidentifier generated by NewID(), (3) sort the rows by this uniqueidentifier and (4) pick off the top 100 from the sorted list?

Yes. this is pretty much exactly correct (except it doesn't necessarily need to sort all the rows). You can verify this by looking at the actual execution plan.

SELECT TOP 100 * 
FROM master..spt_values 
ORDER BY NEWID()

The compute scalar operator adds the NEWID() column on for each row (2506 in the table in my example query) then the rows in the table are sorted by this column with the top 100 selected.

SQL Server doesn't actually need to sort the entire set from positions 100 down so it uses a TOP N sort operator which attempts to perform the entire sort operation in memory (for small values of N)

Plan

3
  • Got it! And yes, you're right - once I've determined the top 100 rows from the entire set, there's no need to sort the rest. Feb 12, 2011 at 22:08
  • So, is it safe to ensure that no data is written? Since this is a SELECT query, the NEWID() will calculate a randomized identifier just for the query, it won't be updating anything in the database with this new id, right?
    – K09P
    Mar 25, 2019 at 11:40
  • 1
    Yes it won't affect the tables you are selecting from. At least some of the data will be temporarily written to a worktable in tempdb to hold at least the TOP N results but nothing written to the user database Mar 25, 2019 at 12:36
11

In general it works like this:

  • All rows from mytable is "looped"
  • NEWID() is executed for each row
  • The rows are sorted according to random number from NEWID()
  • 100 first row are selected
8

The key here is the NEWID function, which generates a globally unique identifier (GUID) in memory for each row. By definition, the GUID is unique and fairly random; so, when you sort by that GUID with the ORDER BY clause, you get a random ordering of the rows in the table. Taking the top 10 percent (or whatever percentage you want) will give you a random sampling of the rows in the table.

NEWID query is proposed; it is simple and works very well for small tables. However, the NEWID query has a big drawback when you use it for large tables. The ORDER BY clause causes all of the rows in the table to be copied into the tempdb database, where they are sorted. This causes two problems: The sorting operation usually has a high cost associated with it. Sorting can use a lot of disk I/O and can run for a long time. In the worst-case scenario, tempdb can run out of space. In the best-case scenario, tempdb can take up a large amount of disk space that never will be reclaimed without a manual shrink command. What you need is a way to select rows randomly that will not use tempdb and will not get much slower as the table gets larger. Here is a new idea on how to do that:

SELECT * FROM master..spt_values
  WHERE (ABS(CAST(
  (BINARY_CHECKSUM(*) *
  RAND()) as int)) % 100) < 10

The basic idea behind this query is that we want to generate a random number between 0 and 99 for each row in the table, and then choose all of those rows whose random number is less than the value of the specified percent. In this example, we want approximately 10 percent of the rows selected randomly; therefore, we choose all of the rows whose random number is less than 10.

1
  • 1
    Good idea, but it would only work if you are trying to do a TOP N%. If you do a regular TOP 500 for example it won't work. Unless you have a different way to that (which I would love to hear). Thanks. Mar 7, 2016 at 15:35
4

as MSDN says:

NewID() Creates a unique value of type uniqueidentifier.

and your table will be sorted by this random values.

1
  • 1
    Thanks - I know what NewID() does, I'm just trying to understand how it would help in the random selection. Is it that [1] the select statement will select EVERYTHING from mytable, [2] for each row selected, tack on a uniqueidentifier generated by NewID(), [3] sort the rows by this uniqueidentifier and [4] pick off the top 100 from the sorted list? Feb 12, 2011 at 19:50
0

use select top 100 randid = newid(), * from mytable order by randid you will be clarified then..

0

I have an unimportant query which uses newId() and joins many tables. It returns about 10k rows in about 3 seconds. So, newId() might be ok in such cases where performance is not too bad & does not have a huge impact. But, newId() is bad for large tables.

Here is the explanation from Brent Ozar's blog - https://www.brentozar.com/archive/2018/03/get-random-row-large-table/.

From the above link, I have summarized the methods which you can use to generate a random id. You can read the blog for more details.

4 ways to get a random row from a large table:

  1. Method 1, Bad: ORDER BY NEWID() > Bad performance!
  2. Method 2, Better but Strange: TABLESAMPLE > Many gotchas & is not really random!
  3. Method 3, Best but Requires Code: Random Primary Key > Fastest, but won't work for negative numbers.
  4. Method 4, OFFSET-FETCH (2012+) > Only performs properly with a clustered index.

More on method 3: Get the top ID field in the table, generate a random number, and look for that ID. For top N rows, call the code below N times or generate N random numbers and use in an IN clause.

/* Get a random number smaller than the table's top ID */
DECLARE @rand BIGINT;
DECLARE @maxid INT = (SELECT MAX(Id) FROM dbo.Users);
SELECT @rand = ABS((CHECKSUM(NEWID()))) % @maxid;

/* Get the first row around that ID */
SELECT TOP 1 *
FROM dbo.Users AS u
WHERE u.Id >= @rand;

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