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I tried to implement Queue.In my deleteq function I want to free only the pointer to another struct(elemet of queue) and return pointer to value of the deleted element,but free function causes an error:Segmentation fault.

struct Node{
   void* val;
   struct Node* next;
};

typedef struct Queue{
    struct Node* head;
    struct Node* tail;
}Queue;

Queue nw_queue(void* val){
    struct Node *node_ptr = (struct Node*)malloc(sizeof(struct Node));
    node_ptr->val = val;
    node_ptr->next = NULL;
    Queue q;
    q.head = node_ptr;
    q.tail = node_ptr;
    return q;
}



void add(Queue *q, void* val){
    struct Node *node_ptr = (struct Node*)malloc(sizeof(struct Node));
    node_ptr->val = val;
    node_ptr->next = NULL;
    if (empty(*q)){
        *q = nw_queue(val);
        return ;
    }
    q->tail->next = node_ptr;
    q->tail = node_ptr;
}

void* deleteq(Queue* q_ptr){
    if (empty(*q_ptr)){
        puts("Error deleteq:Empty queue");
        return NULL;
    }
    struct Node* cur_head = q_ptr->head;
    q_ptr->head = q_ptr->head->next;
    struct Node** toFree = &(cur_head->next);
    free(toFree); //Error
    return cur_head->val;
}

int main()
{
    int a = 5;
    Queue q = nw_queue(&a);
    add(&q, &a);
    deleteq(&q);
    return 0;
}
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    You appear to be having a XY Problem, you can't use a pointer after free()ing it. – Iharob Al Asimi Apr 12 '18 at 14:30
  • regarding: struct Node *node_ptr = (struct Node*)malloc(sizeof(struct Node)); When calling any of the heap allocation functions: malloc calloc realloc 1) the returned value has type void* so can be assigned to any pointer. Casting just clutters the code. 2) always check (!=NULL) the returned value to assure the operation was successful. if not successful, call perror( "malloc failed" ); then cleanup then call exit( EXIT_FAILURE ); – user3629249 Apr 13 '18 at 14:19
  • where is the function: empty()? – user3629249 Apr 13 '18 at 14:20
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    the posted code does not compile!. Amongst other things, it is missing the needed #include statements for the needed header files – user3629249 Apr 13 '18 at 14:22
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I don't understand what you are trying to achieve, but the following is certainly wrong

struct Node** toFree = &(cur_head->next);
free(toFree); //Error

you are freeing a stack address there, not a pointer that was returned by malloc()/calloc()/realloc(), anything else that you pass to free() is undefined behavior.

So the fix is, only pass to free() anything that you malloc(), calloc() or realloc() i.e. dynamically allocated memory.

Why am I so sure that the code above is wrong? Becase & will give you the address of something, and that's a pointer of course but not one returned by malloc(), calloc() or realloc() which are the only ones allowed to be free()ed.

  • But I thought, that, if I malloced space for struct, when I created the element in add or nw_queue, I malloced space for the pointers in struct as well. Is it correct? @Iharob Al Asimi – Игорь Корпенко Apr 12 '18 at 14:47
  • Yes, you should malloc() any pointer that is supposed to point to dynamically generated, you then put data in the address that the pointer stores, and then free() when you no longer need to access the pointer. I appears that what you really need is to study pointers a little more. – Iharob Al Asimi Apr 12 '18 at 15:59
  • It is not a stack address; it is the address of a variable within (but not at the beginning of) a heap-allocated object. &cur_head would be a stack address; cur_head->next is a member of the object that cur_head points to, and &(cur_head->next) is the address of the member within that object. It is the wrong thing to free, but it is not a stack address. – davmac Apr 13 '18 at 15:46
  • I don't know why, but my code works if I swap declarations in struct Node definiton. – Игорь Корпенко Apr 18 '18 at 14:50
  • Read about undefined behavior. – Iharob Al Asimi Apr 18 '18 at 15:33
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the following proposed code:

  1. only creates a single linked list rather than a double linked list. It is up to the OP to add the 'prev' links
  2. for convenience. used different function names
  3. eliminated the creation of the queue function
  4. eliminated treating the queue head radically different from the other queue nodes
  5. properly checks for error indications from C library functions
  6. for flexibility, separates the struct definition from the typedef for the struct
  7. does not create a circular queue

The following code should point the OP in the right direction, without writing all the code for them.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>


struct Queue
{
    void   *data;
    struct Queue* next;
    struct Queue* prev;
};
typedef struct Queue Queue;


// prototypes
void addq( Queue **q, void* val );
void delq( Queue **q );


int main( void )
{
    int a = 5;
    Queue *q = NULL;

    addq( &q, (void*)&a);
    delq( &q);

    return 0;
}


void addq( Queue **q, void* val )
{
    struct Queue *node_ptr = malloc(sizeof(*node_ptr ));
    if( !node_ptr )
    {
        perror( "malloc failed" );
        exit( EXIT_FAILURE );
    }

    // implied else, malloc successful

    node_ptr->data = val;
    node_ptr->next = NULL;

    if (!*q )
    {
        *q = node_ptr;
        return ;
    }

    Queue *current;
    for( current = *q; current->next; current = current->next );

    current->next = node_ptr;
}


void delq( Queue **q )
{
    if( !*q )
    {
        puts("Error deleteq:Empty queue");
    }

    struct Queue  *cur_head = *q;
    *q = (*q)->next;

    free( cur_head );
}

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