2

I have a compute-intensive PL/SQL procedure. If it is not compiled with optimization level set to at least 2 (yes, I know it's the default), the performance is horrible. How can I make sure that this procedure is always compiled with the level to set to 2 or higher?

4

PL/SQL's conditional compilation feature, and more specifically the error directive, comes in very handy for this situation. In the example below, I set the optimization level to 1 and then try to compile my compute intensive procedure. Inside that procedure I check the value of the optimization level in my session through the $$plsql_optimize_level conditional compilation flag. If less than 2, I force a compile error.

ALTER SESSION SET plsql_optimize_level = 1
/

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE compute_intensive
AUTHID DEFINER
IS
BEGIN
   $IF $$plsql_optimize_level < 2
   $THEN
      $ERROR 
         'Compile compute_intensive at level 2 or higher!' 
      $END
   $END
   NULL;
END compute_intensive;
/

Errors: PROCEDURE COMPUTE_INTENSIVE
Line: 7 PLS-00179: $ERROR: compute_intensive must be compiled with maximum optimization!

ALTER SESSION SET plsql_optimize_level = 3
/

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE compute_intensive
AUTHID DEFINER
IS
BEGIN
   $IF $$plsql_optimize_level < 2
   $THEN
      $ERROR 'compute_intensive must be compiled with maximum optimization!' $END
   $END
   NULL;
END compute_intensive;
/

Procedure created.

Try it out yourself with my LiveSQL script.

More info on conditional compilation here.

  • Heh I've read recently your article On Conditional Compilation( COMPUTE_INTENSIVE_PROGRAM). I like your blog too :) And I hope PL/SQL isn't dead for future developments – Lukasz Szozda Apr 12 '18 at 14:53
  • Dead? Heavens no! The rate of new features has slowed, largely because PL/SQL is already so capable and finely honed for its purpose as a database programming language. But definitely not dead, and it will play a more and more crucial role as the API to your data: Javascript <-> JSON <-> REST <-> PL/SQL package api <-> SQL. Thanks! – Steven Feuerstein Apr 12 '18 at 20:56

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