5

Suppose I have the following code

#include <thread>
#include <iostream>
#include <atomic>

struct FooBase {
    void start(){
        run_condition_ = true;
        t_ = std::thread([this](){
            thread_handler();
        });
    }

    virtual ~FooBase(){
        run_condition_ = false;
        if(t_.joinable())
            t_.join();
    }

protected:
    virtual void thread_handler() = 0;
    std::atomic_bool run_condition_{false};
private:
    std::thread t_;
};


struct Foo : FooBase {
    void thread_handler() override {
        while(run_condition_){
            std::cout << "Foo derived thread.." << std::endl;
        }
    }
};


int main(){
    Foo f;
    f.start();

    getchar();

    return 0;
}

Here I think because the destructor of the derived class Foo is called before FooBase the thread_handler vtable lookup happens in the base class IF the thread has not yet joined (still running) when the destructor of Foo is done. Since FooBase::thread_handler is pure virtual I am essentially guranteed a sigabort.

How do I guard against this? I hack my way through by not having thread_handler as pure virtual

virtual void thread_handler(){}

But I am lost as to how I can guard against this in the baseclass itself, I can implement a join_thread interface in the base class and call this from every derived class, but this seems cumbersome.

  • 1
    This doesn't address the question, but there is no need for the test if (t_.joinable(). The thread is joinable. – Pete Becker Apr 12 '18 at 23:15
  • 1
    What is the purpose of mixing class hierarchy with multi-threading? Is it so the thread-function has access to the base class members? I think the design needs to separate those concerns. Having a hard time wrapping my head around this. I get stuck on "why?" – Jive Dadson Apr 12 '18 at 23:37
  • I have convinced myself that the design is untenable. By making the thread-routine part of a derived class, you make it responsible for destructing the object, yet the base-class destructor is responsible for joining the thread-routine. Circular dependency. I suggest, dispense with inheritance; Make the thread-routines free functions, "friends". Pass a handle to the free function to the object. – Jive Dadson Apr 12 '18 at 23:59
  • The why is that the derived thread handlers may want to change the state of their own class. – arynaq Apr 13 '18 at 6:36
  • vtables are inherently read only; you can have a race on a the vptr if you call a virtual function (on thread A) during construction or destruction (on thread B), not on the vtable – curiousguy Apr 26 '18 at 2:33
4

There's two issues here, neither of which match precisely what you described.

  1. Your thread only gets stopped in ~FooBase(). This means that if Foo::thread_handler ever reads or writes to any of its members, they will get destroyed out from under it before the thread is stopped.

  2. It you get to the destructor fast enough, it's possible that start() won't have actually invoked thread_handler() on the new thread by the time Foo gets destroyed - which will lead to the pure virtual call.

Either way, you need to ensure that by the time Foo is destroyed, anything related to thread_handler is done. This implies that every derived class from FooBase has to have, in its destructor:

run_condition_ = false;
if (t_.joinable()) {
    t_join();
}

Setting aside that this directly doesn't work because t_ is private (you could wrap that into a protected stop()), it's an awkward design if all of your derived classes need to do something special just to work. You could instead put FooBase into its own class that just takes an arbitrary callable as an argument:

class joining_thread {
public:
    joining_thread() = default;
    ~joining_thread() { stop(); }

    bool running() const { return run_condition_.load(); }

    template <typename... Args>
    void start(Args&&... args) {
        run_condition_ = true;
        t_ = std::thread(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    }

    void stop() {
        run_condition_ = false;
        if (t_.joinable()) t_.join();
    }
private:
    std::thread t_;
    std::atomic_bool run_condition_{false};
};

And then your Foo can just have that as a member:

class Foo {
public:
    void start() {
        t_.start([this]{
            while (t_.running()) { ... }
        });
    }

private:
    // just make me the last member, so it's destroyed first
    joining_thread t_;
};

That's still a little awkward with the whole running() thing, but hopefully the idea makes sense.

  • Yes this wrapper around the thread is a better design, I just wanted to convey to the derived classes that "Alright, everything is taken care of, just tell me what you want me to do inside the event thread". I am trying to build a node based processing chain for openCV. – arynaq Apr 13 '18 at 6:38
1

What you describe is not possible. You call "start" after you have constructed the object. The object is at that stage valid. You have avoided the common problem of calling a virtual function in the constructor, which would have caused issues. There is something called a memory barrier that is implied by any thread calls, so you can count on the fact the new thread will start with a view of memory that existed at the point it was created. Any thing that existed AND was not changed, is fine.
Your problem (as described in another answer) is that you can exit and destroy the object (and it's vtable), before the thread is complete.
The simplest fix for this is use a packaged task. Calling "get" on the future ensures the task is finished before you continue. Consider the code below

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <thread>
#include <iostream>
#include <atomic>
#include <future>

int main()
{
    std::atomic<bool> stop{ false };
    std::future<void> sync;
    std::packaged_task<void()> task([&stop]()
    {
        while (!stop) 
        { 
            std::cout << "Running\n"; 
        }
    });
    std::thread thread([&task]() {task();});
    getchar();
    stop = true;
    task.get_future().get();
    thread.join();
    return 0;
}
  • 1
    Actually the vtable is neither constructed nor destroyed. It exists in the map-file as a compiler-generated object, only the pointer to it is changed. I just didn't want to get too detailed. If you don't believe me look at the map-file of your code. (-map in gcc) – Tiger4Hire Apr 13 '18 at 14:14

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