I am implementing a Twitter-like application in Erlang. I have both its distributed and non-distributed implementations. I am doing a benchmark but it seems I cannot find a way to send parallel requests to each user process for the distributed implementation. I am using a lists:foreach function to send "get tweets" to a list of client processes.My understanding is that the lists:foreach function steps into each element of the list one at a time realizing a sequential behavior which ultimately makes my distributed implementation result in an equal execution time with the non-distributed implementation. Is it possible to send the "get tweets" requests to different client processes all at once? This to me seems like a rather specific case and it has been difficult to search for a solution inside and outside StackOverflow.

test_get_tweets_Bench() ->
{ServerPid, UserInfos} = initializeForBench_server(),
run_benchmark("timeline",
    fun () ->
        lists:foreach(fun (_) ->
            UserChoice = pick_random(UserInfos),
            server:get_tweets(element(2, UserChoice), element(1, UserChoice), 1)
        end,
        lists:seq(1, 10000))
    end,
    30).

pick_random(List) ->
lists:nth(rand:uniform(length(List)), List).

userinfos is a list of the following form: [{userId,client_process},...]

After trying rpc:pmap instead of the lists:foreach, my benchmark has become approximately 3 times slower. The changes are as follows:

test_get_tweets_Bench2() ->
{ServerPid, UserInfos} = initializeForBench_server(),
run_benchmark("get_tweets 2",
    fun () ->
        rpc:pmap({?MODULE,do_apply},
                 [fun (_) ->
            UserChoice = pick_random(UserInfos),
            server:get_tweets(element(2, UserChoice), element(1, UserChoice), 1)
        end],
                    lists:seq(1, 10000))
    end,
    30).


pick_random(List) ->
    lists:nth(rand:uniform(length(List)), List).

do_apply(X,F)->
    F(X).

I thought rpc:pmap would make my benchmark faster as it would send the get_tweet requests in parallel.

Below is my server module which is the API between my benchmark and my Twitter-like application. The API sends the requests from my benchmark to my Twitter-like application.

    %% This module provides the protocol that is used to interact with an
%% implementation of a microblogging service.
%%
%% The interface is design to be synchrounous: it waits for the reply of the
%% system.
%%
%% This module defines the public API that is supposed to be used for
%% experiments. The semantics of the API here should remain unchanged.
-module(server).

-export([register_user/1,
         subscribe/3,
         get_timeline/3,
         get_tweets/3,
         tweet/3]).

%%
%% Server API
%%

% Register a new user. Returns its id and a pid that should be used for
% subsequent requests by this client.
-spec register_user(pid()) -> {integer(), pid()}.
register_user(ServerPid) ->
    ServerPid ! {self(), register_user},
    receive
        {ResponsePid, registered_user, UserId} -> {UserId, ResponsePid}
    end.

% Subscribe/follow another user.
-spec subscribe(pid(), integer(), integer()) -> ok.
subscribe(ServerPid, UserId, UserIdToSubscribeTo) ->
    ServerPid ! {self(), subscribe, UserId, UserIdToSubscribeTo},
    receive
        {_ResponsePid, subscribed, UserId, UserIdToSubscribeTo} -> ok
    end.

% Request a page of the timeline of a particular user.
% Request results can be 'paginated' to reduce the amount of data to be sent in
% a single response. This is up to the server.
-spec get_timeline(pid(), integer(), integer()) -> [{tweet, integer(), erlang:timestamp(), string()}].
get_timeline(ServerPid, UserId, Page) ->
    ServerPid ! {self(), get_timeline, UserId, Page},
    receive
        {_ResponsePid, timeline, UserId, Page, Timeline} ->
            Timeline
    end.

% Request a page of tweets of a particular user.
% Request results can be 'paginated' to reduce the amount of data to be sent in
% a single response. This is up to the server.
-spec get_tweets(pid(), integer(), integer()) -> [{tweet, integer(), erlang:timestamp(), string()}].
get_tweets(ServerPid, UserId, Page) ->
    ServerPid ! {self(), get_tweets, UserId, Page},
    receive
        {_ResponsePid, tweets, UserId, Page, Tweets} ->
            Tweets
    end.

% Submit a tweet for a user.
% (Authorization/security are not regarded in any way.)
-spec tweet(pid(), integer(), string()) -> erlang:timestamp(). 
tweet(ServerPid, UserId, Tweet) ->
    ServerPid ! {self(), tweet, UserId, Tweet},
    receive
        {_ResponsePid, tweet_accepted, UserId, Timestamp} ->
            Timestamp
    end.
  • I think for parallel requests in Erlang you should use parallel map. You can look at pmap here: stackoverflow.com/questions/7595128/…. – Alex Apr 13 at 8:08
  • After changing my lists:foreach to rpc:pmap, my benchmark now runs slower than before (approximately 2 -3 times slower). I thought this change would speed up as it sends the requests in parallel to distributed processes. – Gakuo Apr 13 at 13:48

In Erlang, a message is exchanged form a process A to a process B. There is no feature available like a broadcast, or a selective broadcast. In your application I see 3 steps:

  1. send a request to get the tweets from the users,
  2. the user process prepare the answer and send it back to the requester
  3. the initial process collects the answers

Sending the requests to the user processes and collecting the tweets (steps 1 and 3) cannot use parallelism. Of course you can use multiple processes to send the requests and collect the answers, up to 1 per user, but I guess that it is not the subject of your question.

What is feasible, is to ensure that the 3 steps are not done in sequence for each user process, but in parallel. I guess that the function server:get_tweets is responsible to send the request and collect the answers. If I am correct (I cannot know since You don't provide the code, and you ignore the returned values), you can use parallelism by splitting this function in 2, the first send the requests, the second collects the answers. (here is an example of code, I don't have tried or even compiled, so consider it with care :o)

test_get_tweets_Bench() ->
{ServerPid, UserInfos} = initializeForBench_server(),
run_benchmark("timeline",
    fun () ->
        % send the requests
        List = lists:map(fun (_) ->
            {UserId,Pid} = pick_random(UserInfos),
            Ref = server:request_tweets(Pid,UserId),
            {Ref,UserId}
            end,
            lists:seq(1, 10000)),
        % collects the answers
        collect(L,[])
    end,
    30).

collect([],Result) -> {ok,Result};
collect(List,ResultSoFar) ->
    receive
        {Ref,UserId,Tweets} ->
            {ok,NewList} = remove_pending_request(Ref,UserId,List),
            collect(Newlist,[{UserId,Tweets}|ResultSoFar])
    after ?TIMEOUT
        {error,timeout,List,ResultSoFar}
    end.

remove_pending_request(Ref,UserId,List) ->
    {value,{Ref,UserId},NewList} = lists:keytake(Ref,1,List),
    {ok,NewList}. 

pick_random(List) ->
lists:nth(rand:uniform(length(List)), List).

This is my other attempt at implementing a parallel benchmark which does not achieve any speed up.

get_tweets(Sender, UserId, Node) ->
server:get_tweets(Node, UserId, 0),
Sender ! done_get_tweets.

test_get_tweets3() ->
    {_ServerId, UserInfos} = initializeForBench_server(),
    run_benchmark("parallel get_tweet", 
        fun () ->
            lists:foreach(
                fun (_) ->
                    {UserId,Pid} = pick_random(UserInfos),
                    spawn(?MODULE, get_tweets, [self(), UserId, Pid])
                end,
                lists:seq(1, ?NUMBER_OF_REQUESTS)),
            lists:foreach(fun (_) -> receive done_get_tweets -> ok end end, lists:seq(1, ?NUMBER_OF_REQUESTS))
        end,
        ?RUNS).
  • I tried this code implementation and it makes the benchmark run faster than the rpc:pmap but it is still slower(x2 slower) than the lists:foreach implementation. I have added my server module in my current query edit. Is there something I can change there to completely parallelize the requests and make it run faster than even the lists:foreach implementation? – Gakuo Apr 13 at 19:59
  • How many servers (corresponding to the Server Pide variable) are running in parallel in your tests? – Pascal Apr 16 at 16:40
  • I spawn a new process for each server request. The funny thing is that I do not observe a speed up even when I do that. It seems I am missing some important detail about how Erlang works. Look at the last code snippet. – Gakuo Apr 18 at 22:28
  • I'll do, it will take some time, I have no internet connection at the moment, except with my mobile :o) – Pascal Apr 19 at 5:07

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