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Below is the function that finds max number in the array, so prof taught us to prove the partial correctness. He gave the solution proving the loop invariant is maintained. Can any body explain me the solution?

find_max (a: ARRAY [INTEGER]): INTEGER
   require
      not_empty: a.count > 0
   local
      i: INTEGER
   do
      from
         i := a.lower
         Result := a [i]
      invariant
            −− Predicate Equivalent: ∀j | a.lower ≤ j < i • Result ≥ a[j]
         across a.lower |..| (i − 1) as j all Result >= a [j.item] end
      until
         i > a.upper
      loop
            -- { ∀j ∣ a.lower ≤ j < i ● Result ≥ a [j] ∧ ¬(i > a.upper) }
         if a [i] > Result then
            Result := a [i]
         end
            -- { ∀j ∣ a.lower ≤ j < i ● Result ≥ a [j] }
         i := i + 1
      variant
         a.upper − i + 1
      end
   ensure
         −− Predicate Equivalent: ∀j | a.lower ≤ j ≤ a.upper • Result ≥ a[j]
      across ... all ... end
   end

Solution. We first calculate the wp for the loop body to maintain the LI (loop invariant):

   wp (if a[i] > Result then Result := a[i] end; i := i + 1, 
       ∀j | a.lower ≤ j ≤ i − 1 • a.lower ≤ j ∧ j ≤ a.upper ∧ Result ≥ a [j])

= {wp rule for seq. comp. }
   wp (if a[i] > Result then Result := a[i] end, wp (i := i + 1,
       ∀j | a.lower ≤ j ≤ i − 1 • a.lower ≤ j ∧ j ≤ a.upper ∧ Result ≥ a [j]))

= {wp rule for assignment}
   wp (if a[i] > Result then Result := a[i] end, 
       ∀j | a.lower ≤ j ≤ i • a.lower ≤ j ∧ j ≤ a.upper ∧ Result ≥ a [j]) 

= {wp rule for conditional}
   a [i] > Result =⇒ wp (Result := a[i], 
                         ∀j | a.lower ≤ j ≤ i • a.lower ≤ j ∧ j ≤ a.upper ∧ Result ≥ a [j])
   ∧
   a [i] ≤ Result =⇒ wp (Result := Result, 
                         ∀j | a.lower ≤ j ≤ i • a.lower ≤ j ∧ j ≤ a.upper ∧ Result ≥ a [j])

= {wp rule for assignment, twice}
   a [i] > Result =⇒ ∀j | a.lower ≤ j ≤ i • a.lower ≤ j ∧ j ≤ a.upper ∧ a [i] ≥ a[j]
   ∧
   a [i] ≤ Result =⇒ ∀j | a.lower ≤ j ≤ i • a.lower ≤ j ∧ j ≤ a.upper ∧ Result ≥ a[j]

We then prove that the precondition (i.e., ¬(exit condition) and LI) is no weaker than the above calculated wp:

¬(i > a.upper) ∧ ( ∀j | a.lower ≤ j ≤ i − 1 • a.lower ≤ j ∧ j ≤ a.upper ∧ Result ≥ a[j] ) =⇒ a [i] > Result =⇒ 
   ∀j | a.lower ≤ j ≤ i • a.lower ≤ j ∧ j ≤ a.upper ∧ a [i] ≥ a [j]


   ∀j | a.lower ≤ j ≤ i • a.lower ≤ j ∧ j ≤ a.upper ∧ a [i] ≥ a [j]

≡ {split range: ∀j | a.lower ≤ j ≤ i • P (j) ≡ (∀j | a.lower ≤ j ≤ i − 1) ∧ P (i)}
  (∀j | a.lower ≤ j ≤ i - 1 • a.lower ≤ j ∧ j ≤ a.upper ∧ a[i] ≥ a[j]) ∧ 
                             (a.lower ≤ i ∧ i ≤ a.upper ∧ a[i] ≥ a[i])

≡ {antecedent: a[i] > Result; and RHS of precond: ∀j | a.lower ≤ j ≤ i − 1 • a.lower ≤ j ∧ j ≤ a.upper ∧ Result ≥ a[j]}
   true ∧ (a.lower ≤ i ∧ i ≤ a.upper ∧ a[i] ≥ a[i])

≡ {LHS of precond: ¬(i > a.upper) and a[i] ≥ a[i] ≡ true}
  (Exercise )
  true
  • Note: your feature, is a function returning an integer. Therefore it should have a noun-phrase for a name, not a verb-phrase. Rational Eiffel coding standard and you don't say “What is the find_maximum value in the list?” or “Would you like get_fries with that?” – ctrl-alt-delor May 30 '18 at 16:40
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General scheme

  1. The function postcondition Q

    ∀j | a.lower ≤ j ≤ a.upper • Result ≥ a [j]
    

    can be derived from the loop invariant L

    ∀j | a.lower ≤ j < i • Result ≥ a [j]
    

    by taking into account the loop exit condition i > a.upper. Given that i is incremented in the loop by 1 at every iteration, the first value that meets the exit condition is i = a.upper + 1. Substitution of this value into L gives Q. Therefore, it is sufficient to prove that L is true before the first iteration and is preserved by the loop.

  2. For the first iteration (i := a.lower and Result := a [i]) the loop invariant becomes

    ∀j | a.lower ≤ j < a.lower • Result ≥ a [j]
    

    that is trivially true (because the range for j is empty).

  3. Let's find the weakest precondition of the loop provided that at the end of every iteration, L should be true. Inside the loop, where according to the exit condition i ≤ a.upper, L is equivalent to

    ∀j | a.lower ≤ j ≤ i − 1 • a.lower ≤ j ∧ j ≤ a.upper ∧ Result ≥ a [j]
    

    that in turn, using the rules of weakest precondition (see below), can be reduced to a conjunction of two predicates

    a [i] > Result =⇒ ∀j | a.lower ≤ j ≤ i • a.lower ≤ j ∧ j ≤ a.upper ∧  a [i] ≥ a[j]
    a [i] ≤ Result =⇒ ∀j | a.lower ≤ j ≤ i • a.lower ≤ j ∧ j ≤ a.upper ∧ Result ≥ a[j]
    

    As shown in the solution, the first one reduces to true with the assumption that the exit condition is not satisfied and the loop invariant L is true before the loop body. The same can be done with the second predicate.

  4. Taking into account that L is satisfied before the first iteration of the loop and is preserved by every iteration, we conclude that L is satisfied after the loop, and, hence, Q is true when the function returns.

Weakest precondition rules

The proof outlined above relies on the following weakest precondition rules:

  1. Sequential composition

    wp (S;T, P) = wp (S, wp (T, P))
    
  2. Assignment

    wp (x := e, P) = P [e/x]
    
  3. Conditional

    wp (if b then S else T end, P) = (b =⇒ wp (S, P)) ∧ (¬b =⇒ wp (T, P))
    

    Explanation. The value of b is unknown in advance. However, if we assume that b is true, the whole instruction reduces to S, and the weakest precondition should be wp (S, P). Indeed, this is what happens when b is replaced with True in the formula above (b =⇒ wp (S, P) becomes wp (S, P) and ¬b =⇒ wp (T, P) becomes True, so the whole formula reduces to wp (S, P)). The similar reasoning applies, if we assume that b is False (the first part becomes True and the second - wp (T, P)).

  • thank u so much alexander, can you please help me with one more thing i am not able to figure out how do we prove this (b =⇒ wp (S, P)) ∧ (¬b =⇒ wp (T, P)) in conditonal precondition rule? what i think this statement means to show b is no weaker then weakest precondition is it correct? – Noor Ahmed Apr 13 '18 at 19:24
  • @NoorAhmed, indeed we can say that. However, there is a better intuition - "assuming that b is True, the weakest precondition is wp (S, P)". I've updated the answer with the explanation. – Alexander Kogtenkov Apr 14 '18 at 11:56

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