2

After reading this piece by Yegor about not using getters and setters, it sounds like something that makes sense to me.

Please note this question is not about whether doing it is better/worst, only if I am implementing it correctly

I was wondering in the following two examples in VBA, if I understand the concept correctly, and if I am applying it correctly.

The standard way would be:

Private userName As String

Public Property Get Name() As String
    Name = userName
End Property
Public Property Let Name(rData As String)
    userName = rData
End Property

It looks to me his way would be something like this:

Private userName As String

Public Function returnName() As String
    returnName = userName
End Function

Public Function giveNewName(newName As String) As String
    userName = newName
End Function

From what I understand from the two examples above is that if I wanted to change the format of userName (lets say return it in all-caps), then I can do this with the second method without changing the name of the method that gives the name through - I can just let returnName point to a userNameCaps property. The rest of my code in my program can still stay the same and point to the method userName.

But if I want to do this with the first example, I can make a new property, but then have to change my code everywhere in the program as well to point to the new property... is that correct?

In other words, in the first example the API gets info from a property, and in the second example the API gets info from a method.

4

Your 2nd snippet is neither idiomatic nor equivalent. That article you link to, is about Java, a language which has no concept whatsoever of object properties - getFoo/setFoo is a mere convention in Java.

In VBA this:

Private userName As String

Public Property Get Name() As String
    Name = userName
End Property
Public Property Let Name(rData As String)
    userName = rData
End Property

Is ultimately equivalent to this:

Public UserName As String

Not convinced? Add such a public field to a class module, say, Class1. Then add a new class module and add this:

Implements Class1

The compiler will force you to implement a Property Get and a Property Let member, so that the Class1 interface contract can be fulfilled.

So why bother with properties then? Properties are a tool, to help with encapsulation.

Option Explicit
Private Type TSomething
    Foo As Long
End Type
Private this As TSomething

Public Property Get Foo() As Long
    Foo = this.Foo
End Property

Public Property Let Foo(ByVal value As Long)
    If value <= 0 Then Err.Raise 5
    this.Foo = value
End Property

Now if you try to assign Foo with a negative value, you'll get a runtime error: the property is encapsulating an internal state that only the class knows and is able to mutate: calling code doesn't see or know about the encapsulated value - all it knows is that Foo is a read/write property. The validation logic in the "setter" ensures the object is in a consistent state at all times.

If you want to break down a property into methods, then you need a Function for the getter, and assignment would be a Sub not a Function. In fact, Rubberduck would tell you that there's a problem with the return value of giveNewName being never assigned: that's a much worse code smell than "OMG you're using properties!".

Functions return a value. Subs/methods do something - in the case of an object/class, that something might imply mutating internal state.

But by avoiding Property Let just because some Java guy said getters & setters are evil, you're just making your VBA API more cluttered than it needs to be - because VBA understands properties, and Java does not. C# and VB.NET do however, so if anything the principles of these languages would be much more readily applicable to VBA than Java's, at least with regards to properties. See Property vs Method.

FWIW public member names in VB would be PascalCase by convention. camelCase public member names are a Java thing. Notice how everything in the standard libraries starts with a Capital first letter?

  • OK. It's just the idea that I got was not that the get/set thing was a Java problem, but that it was a OOP (encapsulation) problem. It just happened to be more of a problem in Java. In the end I don't want to write good VB code, I want to write good OOP code, so it was something that I thought of getting right from the beginning. Looking at this answer (softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/a/120831/302738), some people in the comments say that having a lot of getters and setters in your code is also a sign of code smell... – Alfa Bravo Apr 13 '18 at 12:33
  • @AlfaBravo I guess if your objects interact mainly on the base of those setters/getters, that could be a sign that your code is tightly coupled... – Inarion Apr 13 '18 at 12:41
1

It seems to me that you've just given the property accessors new names. They are functionally identical.

I think the idea of not using getters/setters implies that you don't try to externally modify an object's state - because if you do, the object is not much more than a user-defined type, a simple collection of data. Objects/Classes should be defined by their behavior. The data they contain should only be there to enable/support that behavior.
That means you don't tell the object how it has to be or what data you want it to hold. You tell it what you want it to do or what is happening to it. The object itself then decides how to modify its state.

To me it seems your example class is a little too simple to work as an example. It's not clear what the intended purpose is: Currently you'd probably better off just using a variable UserName instead.

Have a look at this answer to a related question - I think it provides a good example.


Regarding your edit:

From what I understand from the two examples above is that if I wanted to change the format of userName (lets say return it in all-caps), then I can do this with the second method without changing the name of the method that gives the name through - I can just let returnName point to a userNameCaps property. The rest of my code in my program can still stay the same and point to the method iserName.

But if I want to do this with the first example, I can make a new property, but then have to change my code everywhere in the program as well to point to the new property... is that correct?

Actually, what you're describing here, is possible in both approaches. You can have a property

Public Property Get Name() As String
    ' possibly more code here...
    Name = UCase(UserName)
End Property

or an equivalent function

Public Function Name() As String
    ' possibly more code here...
    Name = UCase(UserName)
End Function

As long as you only change the property/function body, no external code needs to be adapted. Keep the property's/function's signature (the first line, including the Public statement, its name, its type and the order and type of its parameters) unchanged and you should not need to change anything outside the class to accommodate.

  • Hi, I have added some more info at the end of my question that I think brings out the difference between the two examples a bit better. – Alfa Bravo Apr 13 '18 at 9:57
1

The Java article is making some sort of philosophic design stance that is not limited to Java: The general advise is to severely limit any details on how a class is implemented to avoid making one's code harder to maintain. Putting such advice into VBA terms isn't irrelevant.

Microsoft popularized the idea of a Property that is in fact a method (or two) which masquerade as a field (i.e. any garden-variety variable). It is a neat-and-tidy way to package up a getter and setter together. Beyond that, really, behind the scenes it's still just a set of functions or subroutines that perform as accessors for your class.

Understand that VBA does not do classes, but it does do interfaces. That's what a "Class Module" is: An interface to an (anonymous) class. When you say Dim o As New MyClassModule, VBA calls some factory function which returns an instance of the class that goes with MyClassModule. From that point, o references the interface (which in turn is wired into the instance). As @Mathieu Guindon has demonstrated, Public UserName As String inside a class module really becomes a Property behind the scenes anyway. Why? Because a Class Module is an interface, and an interface is a set of (pointers to) functions and subroutines.

As for the philosophic design stance, the really big idea here is not to make too many promises. If UserName is a String, it must always remain a String. Furthermore, it must always be available - you cannot remove it from future versions of your class! UserName might not be the best example here (afterall, why wouldn't a String cover all needs? for what reason might UserName become superfluous?). But it does happen that what seemed like a good idea at the time the class was being made turns into a big goof. Imagine a Public TwiddlePuff As Integer (or instead getTwiddlePuff() As Integer and setTwiddlePuff(value As Integer)) only to find out (much later on!) that Integer isn't sufficient anymore, maybe it should have been Long. Or maybe a Double. If you try to change TwiddlePuff now, anything compiled back when it was Integer will likely break. So maybe people making new code will be fine, and maybe it's mostly the folks who still need to use some of the old code who are now stuck with a problem.

And what if TwiddlePuff turned out to be a really big design mistake, that it should not have been there in the first place? Well, removing it brings its own set of headaches. If TwiddlePuff was used at all elsewhere, that means some folks may have a big refactoring job on their hands. And that might not be the worst of it - if your code compiles to native binaries especially, that makes for a really big mess, since an interface is about a set of function pointers layed out and ordered in a very specific way.

Too reiterate, do not make too many promises. Think through on what you will share with others. Properties-getters-setters-accessors are okay, but must be used thoughtfully and sparingly. All of that above is important if what you are making is code that you are going to share with others, and others will take it and use it as part of a larger system of code, and it may be that these others intend to share their larger systems of code with yet even more people who will use that in their even larger systems of code.

That right there is probably why hiding implementation details to the greatest extent possible is regarded as fundamental to object oriented programming.

  • Thank you for this detailed answer, it helped allot in furthering my understanding. – Alfa Bravo Apr 17 '18 at 14:09

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