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I am working on a Xcode project that uses a C/C++ library which I have imported the source code to my project.

I have created the correspondent bridging header and I am using a test method I have recently created to see if the code works. When building the project I get the error

Symbol(s) not found for architecture x86_64

The complete output of the error shown in Xcode is this

Error Output

My deployment target is iOS 11 so no device should use 32 bits but I get errors related to 32 bits architectures.

MyApp-Bridging-Header.h

//
//  Use this file to import your target's public headers that you would like to expose to Swift.
//

#import "main.h"

Header file

#ifndef main_h
#define main_h

#include <stdio.h>

int my_print();

#endif /* main.h */
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    What is a C/C++ library? There is no language C/C++. Where do you see hints for 32bit? What header did you create? Doesn't the library brings the required headers?
    – Gerhardh
    Apr 13 '18 at 10:40
  • Library that uses C and C++ code Apr 13 '18 at 10:41
  • Was my_print compiled with a C compiler and main.h is included in code that's compiled with C++?
    – Art
    Apr 13 '18 at 10:58
  • I have not compiled it, I have imported the source code (all .h and .c files) into Xcode. And I think it's Xcode the one that compiles the library when I hit build Apr 13 '18 at 11:03
  • DOn't spam tags. C is not C++ is not objective-C is not … I hope you got it. And a library can only be written in either C or C++ or objective C. Apr 13 '18 at 12:01
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As the compiler complains about not finding definition of "_my_print", you could 1) check if the linking libraries include definition of _my_print 2) if you're using XCODE UI to build, try checking if all sources are added in path and libraries are intact

To me it seems straighforward linking issue and mis-configuration

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After trying a lot of things that many people claimed it solved similar problems to this I came up with the solution without knowing it.

My previous main.h file was this one

#ifndef main_h
#define main_h

#include <stdio.h>

int my_print();

#endif /* main.h */

Surrounding my function with extern "C" solved it and now I can interact with my C and C++ library using Swift. Now the main.h file looks like this

#ifndef main_h
#define main_h

#include <stdio.h>

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif
    int my_print();
#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

#endif /* main.h */

I am not 100% sure how this works so if anyone has a reasonable explanation why this works I am more than happy to hear it.

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