2

So I was wondering about whether I could save a type in a variable, to be used later on in the same function.

My code is as follows:

func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, cellForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> UITableViewCell {
    guard let object = array.item(at: indexPath.row) else {
        fatalError("Could not retrieve the table object")
    }

    if object.displayOnLeft {
        guard let cell = tableView.dequeueReusableCell(withIdentifier: LeftSidedCell.className, for: indexPath) as? LeftSidedCell else {
            fatalError("Could not dequeue the left sided cell")
        }
        cell.object = object
        return cell
    } else {
        guard let cell = tableView.dequeueReusableCell(withIdentifier: RightSidedCell.className, for: indexPath) as? RightSidedCell else {
             fatalError("Could not dequeue the right sided cell")
        }
        cell.object = object
        return cell
    }
}

But I figured that this is actually quite clunky, since the contents inside the if and the else are essentially the same, with just the type of cell differing.

I ideally want an algorithm that is basically:

var type
if object.displayOnLeft {
   type = LeftSidedCell
} else {
   type = RightSidedCell
}

//Dequeue Cell with type

I understand there are a few issues here, firstly, I cannot declare a variable without a type, and i'm not sure what type to assign it to at first. Second, retrieving the type of class has not been fruitful either.

I have tried storing it as a property in the Object, as well as returning it in a function such as this in my custom object as well as some variations of the following:

func getTypeOfCell<T:TranslationCellProtocol>() -> T.Type {
    if displayOnLeft {
        return LeftSidedCell.self
    } else {
        return RightSidedCell.self
    }
}

Anyway, I'm not sure if this is possible or if i have a fundamental misunderstanding of a concept, but any help would be much appreciated.

Thank you.

  • Simple one liner solution is let type = object.displayOnLeft ? LeftSidedCell.self : RightSidedCell.self and then use type.className – Kamran Apr 13 '18 at 14:27
  • @Kamran whilst your solution might be the simplest one, the compiler doesn't allow me to then cast with type.className – Alan S Apr 13 '18 at 14:57
2

First, write a protocol that implements className() method (or any methods and properties you will use for both cell classes) and have both your cell classes conform to it

protocol YourCellProtocol {
    var object : YourObjectClass? { get set }
    static func className() -> String
}

class LeftSidedCell : YourCellProtocol {...)
class RightSidedCell : YourCellProtocol {...}

Then you will be able to do something like that

func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, cellForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> UITableViewCell {
    guard let object = array.item(at: indexPath.row) else {
        fatalError("Could not retrieve the table object")
    }

    var type : YourCellProtocol.Type
    if object.displayOnLeft {
        type = LeftSidedCell.self
    } else {
        type = RightSidedCell.self
    }

    let cell = tableView.dequeueReusableCell(withIdentifier: type.className, for: indexPath)
    if let yourCell = cell as? YourCellProtocol
    {
        yourCell.object = object
    }

    return cell
}
  • Awesome stuff. Thank you! I did end up changing one thing, i didn't use an if else anymore to check the displayOnLeft, I just dequeued a cell using the className (which was the same as the reuse identifier), and then cave it the object exactly as you did. – Alan S Apr 13 '18 at 15:00
2

As long as LeftSidedCell and RightSidedCell have a common superclass — say, MySidedCell — you can store them in a variable of type MySidedCell.Type:

let cellType : MySidedCell.Type = LeftSidedCell.self

You can later just test that value with == to see which cell type it is.

if cellType == LeftSidedCell.self {
  • However, although this is readily possible, I regard it as a wrong kind of thing to do. Manipulation of metatypes in Swift is nearly always a Bad Smell. – matt Apr 13 '18 at 16:37
1

To mind mind you are clogging your code with so many optional checks and those fataError calls. By the time cellForRow is called you should already be sure that your datasource is correct. So there is no need to optionally unwrap your data and table view cells at this point as the app will crash anyway if the data are incorrect.

E.g. do a check if your array has no items or items are somehow invalid before numberOfRowsInSection is called, if your data is not correct return 0 number of items and cellForRow will not get called with that faulty data.

Regarding code cleaniness, this would do for me:

func tableView(_ tableView: UITableView, cellForRowAt indexPath: IndexPath) -> UITableViewCell {
    let object = array[indexPath.row]
    let cell: UITableViewCell

    if object.displayOnLeft {
        cell = tableView.dequeueReusableCell(withIdentifier: "LeftSidedCellIdentifier", for: indexPath) as! LeftSidedCell
    } else {
        cell = tableView.dequeueReusableCell(withIdentifier: "RightSidedCellIdentifier", for: indexPath) as! RightSidedCell
    }

    cell.object = object
    return cell
}
  • Yeah it's a fair point with regards to the many guards and fatal errors, after a certain point we should know that the code will work. I usually set things up like this at first just to make sure that things are working fine, because if they don't my app will crash and i know the reason why, but I still usually use guard for dequeuing the cells and things like that, so thanks for opening my eyes a bit with regards to that. With regards to the question, it more or less became a question of "How can someone do it like this" vs. using the if statement and writing it twice. – Alan S Apr 13 '18 at 14:37

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