234

This question already has an answer here:

I'd like to check if my module is being included or run directly. How can I do this in node.js?

marked as duplicate by AstroCB, tilz0R, O. Jones, Hitham S. AlQadheeb, E_net4 Jul 3 '17 at 23:16

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322

The docs describe another way to do this which may be the preferred method:

When a file is run directly from Node, require.main is set to its module.

To take advantage of this, check if this module is the main module and, if so, call your main code:

var fnName = function(){
    // main code
}

if (require.main === module) {
    fnName();
}

EDIT: If you use this code in a browser, you will get a "Reference error" since "require" is not defined. To prevent this, use:

if (typeof require != 'undefined' && require.main==module) {
    fnName();
}
  • 17
    you always have to check require.main === module irrespective of your function name. To make it clear above code should be modified as: var fnName = function(){ // code } if (require.main === module) { fnName(); } – Kunal Kapadia May 29 '15 at 12:47
  • I would wrap it with try...catch for browser compatibility – Ohad Cohen May 23 '16 at 14:14
  • 4
    @OhadCohen "try...catch" might also catch real errors. I think it is better to just check if typeof require != 'undefined'. – Erel Segal-Halevi Apr 27 '17 at 19:17
  • But what if the file is forked? – deostroll May 3 '17 at 3:11
  • Sadly this feature is gone with --experimental-modules. – seamlik Jul 19 '18 at 14:06
58
if (!module.parent) {
  // this is the main module
} else {
  // we were require()d from somewhere else
}

EDIT: If you use this code in a browser, you will get a "Reference error" since "module" is not defined. To prevent this, use:

if (typeof module != 'undefined' && !module.parent) {
  // this is the main module
} else {
  // we were require()d from somewhere else or from a browser
}
  • Is this documented somewhere? – intuited May 18 '11 at 3:14
  • 11
    Nope, but it's used in one of node.js's tests – nornagon May 19 '11 at 8:52
  • 1
    To me this reads better than the accepted answer and has the benefit of not requiring the module's "name" – blented Sep 20 '13 at 18:47
  • 11
    the accepted answer doesn't use the module's name either. – nornagon Sep 20 '13 at 22:53

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