363

I'd like to check if my module is being included or run directly. How can I do this in node.js?

4
  • 2
    isMain coming soon to node.js near you :) May 1, 2020 at 2:29
  • 1
    @DimaTisnek Source or any more info on isMain? It sounds fantastic but I can't find anything about it Oct 2, 2020 at 12:00
  • 1
    The only significant reference I can find is in a Gist from CJ Silveiro describing NPM's proposal/vision for ESM modules in Node. I haven't been able to find anything official from Node.js themselves. Any links would be appreciated Oct 2, 2020 at 12:15
  • exploringjs.com/nodejs-shell-scripting/… detecting if the current module is “main” (the app entry point)
    – aderchox
    Apr 20, 2023 at 10:51

2 Answers 2

475

The nodejs docs describe another way to do this which may be the preferred method:

When a file is run directly from Node, require.main is set to its module.

To take advantage of this, check if this module is the main module and, if so, call your main code:

function myMain() {
    // main code
}

if (require.main === module) {
    myMain();
}

EDIT: If you use this code in a browser, you will get a "Reference error" since "require" is not defined. To prevent this, use:

if (typeof require !== 'undefined' && require.main === module) {
    myMain();
}
7
  • 18
    you always have to check require.main === module irrespective of your function name. To make it clear above code should be modified as: var fnName = function(){ // code } if (require.main === module) { fnName(); } May 29, 2015 at 12:47
  • I would wrap it with try...catch for browser compatibility
    – Ohad Cohen
    May 23, 2016 at 14:14
  • 4
    @OhadCohen "try...catch" might also catch real errors. I think it is better to just check if typeof require != 'undefined'. Apr 27, 2017 at 19:17
  • 4
    Sadly this feature is gone with --experimental-modules.
    – seamlik
    Jul 19, 2018 at 14:06
  • 2
    @seamlik in this case, the package es-main can be used. Usage: esMain(import.meta) returns true iff the file is not imported. May 13, 2021 at 12:05
69
if (!module.parent) {
  // this is the main module
} else {
  // we were require()d from somewhere else
}

EDIT: If you use this code in a browser, you will get a "Reference error" since "module" is not defined. To prevent this, use:

if (typeof module !== 'undefined' && !module.parent) {
  // this is the main module
} else {
  // we were require()d from somewhere else or from a browser
}
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  • 11
    Nope, but it's used in one of node.js's tests
    – nornagon
    May 19, 2011 at 8:52
  • 1
    To me this reads better than the accepted answer and has the benefit of not requiring the module's "name"
    – blented
    Sep 20, 2013 at 18:47
  • 12
    the accepted answer doesn't use the module's name either.
    – nornagon
    Sep 20, 2013 at 22:53
  • 2
    this is deprecated. use module.main now
    – pcnate
    Sep 15, 2021 at 21:18
  • 1
    @pcnate Could you consider adding another answer to explain how to use module.main?
    – tsh
    Nov 11, 2021 at 2:24

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