2

I don't understand why OCaml is not able to figure out that there is no room for confusion here: anint below can't be other one but A's.

module A = struct
  type test = Graphics.status
end

module type ASIG = sig
  type test = A.test
  val atest : test 
end

module Func (H : ASIG) = struct
  let _ = let open H in atest.key 
end

However, it raises

Warning 40: key was selected from type Graphics.status.
It is not visible in the current scope, and will not 
be selected if the type becomes unknown.

How can I tell it "it's fine" without disabling the warning?

I'm aware I can solve it by opening A. However, if H defines its own functions and types similar---but not equal---to A, then it will have unnecessary clashes. I also know I can duplicate the definition, but that defeats the purpose of type aliasing, and involves lots of unnecessary code duplication. Perhaps there is no solution, but I wonder why OCaml is so blind dumb on this one: type alias should mean also constructor and record fields alias, shouldn't it?

5

You can simply open the the module defining the original type locally when referring to the field key as in the following:

module A = struct
  type test = Graphics.status
end

module type ASIG = sig
  type test = A.test
  val atest : test 
end

module Func (H : ASIG) = struct
  let _ = let open H in atest.Graphics.key 
end

Or if you need to refer to several fields :
let _ = let open H in Graphics.(atest.key, atest.button)

1

Well, this happens because the module signature ASIG needs to look the definition of type test for the implementation of A. This often causes problems with visibility of the types, and sometimes require duplication of type definitions, where the contract satisfies the implementation instead of referring to it.

How can we fix this warning? In ASIG, instead of defining type test = A.test, we need to explicitly do type test = { anint: int }as we did in the implementation, so:

module ASIG = sig
  type test = { anint: int }
  val atest : test
end

module A = struct
  type test = { anint: int }
end

module Func (H : ASIG) = struct
  let _ = let open H in atest.anint
end

The H module would not be able to view anintin its scope, otherwise, because the signature has a type (contract) that links to the implementation. It is also a core concept of OCaml philosophy isolating signatures and implementations and avoiding signatures depending upon implementations.

  • may I abuse your help and ask for a case where such scenario is useful, i.e., aliasing a type but not its constructors/fields? – user3406881 Apr 13 '18 at 14:55
  • 1
    In general, when you do not need to expose the internals of the type to the module which will consume it, you can use only the empty definition of it. For example, if your Func functor had not to use anint explicitly, than the definition for type test of ASIG could be, literally, only type test (this doesn't expose it, we keep it abstract). If you do that, you can use modules with type parameters. In your example, test could be abstract and H an ASIG with type test = A.test. – Marcelo Camargo Apr 13 '18 at 15:00
  • The chapter 2 of OCaml manual talks more about the module system, functors and with type for modules (providing implementations and avoiding duplication): caml.inria.fr/pub/docs/manual-ocaml/moduleexamples.html – Marcelo Camargo Apr 13 '18 at 15:02
  • OK, not really what I need, but thanks. I will update the question to show more what my problem is. – user3406881 Apr 13 '18 at 15:03

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