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I have an ASP.NET Core 2.0 Site that has a scaffolded controller built directly from a simple model and simple context. I seeded the data by simply checking for the number of records in the GET method and if 0, then I added 100 records. GET is retrieving records as I would expect repeatedly.

I'm using the inmemory database provider.

services.AddDbContext<MyDbContext>
            (opt => opt.UseInMemoryDatabase("CodeCampInMemoryDb"));

When I do a PUT with a record that I know existed in my GET, I get a concurrency error as shown at the bottom of this post. I've not used this method of changing the EntityState of a record I created myself, so I'm not sure how this was suppose to work in the first place, but clearly now it is not working.

Maybe it has something to do with a transaction being processed on the inmemory database? I'm not sure how to avoid that if that is the problem.

// PUT: api/Sessions/5
[HttpPut("{id}")]
public async Task<IActionResult> PutSessionRec([FromRoute] int id, [FromBody] SessionRec sessionRec)
{
        if (!ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            return BadRequest(ModelState);
        }

        if (id != sessionRec.Id)
        {
            return BadRequest();
        }

        _context.Entry(sessionRec).State = EntityState.Modified;

        try
        {
            await _context.SaveChangesAsync();
        }
        catch (DbUpdateConcurrencyException xx)
        {
            if (!SessionRecExists(id))
            {
                return NotFound();
            }
            else
            {
                throw;
            }
        }

        return NoContent();
}

Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.DbUpdateConcurrencyException: Attempted to update or delete an entity that does not exist in the store. at Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Storage.Internal.InMemoryTable`1.Update(IUpdateEntry entry) at Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Storage.Internal.InMemoryStore.ExecuteTransaction

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    You have not retrieved the entity from the database into the DbContext before marking it as modified. – Brad Apr 14 '18 at 2:42
  • This is an out of the box scaffolding. Are you saying Microsoft got it wrong? What would be correct? – Peter Kellner Apr 14 '18 at 13:48
  • Missed the bit about it being scaffolded. If it doesn't work out of the box then, yes, Microsoft did get it wrong. Using entities as action parameters IMO is wrong. Is there a property on the SessionRec handling concurrency that is not being populated in the request? – Brad Apr 15 '18 at 0:24
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If you marked a property as a Timestamp and don't provide it, you will get this exception every time. You either need to load the entity with the latest Timestamp and update that (not ideal) or you have to send the Timestamp down to the client and have the client send it back up (correct way). However, if you are using an older version of JSON serialization, you have to convert the byte[] to base 64 and then convert it back.

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