0

Given this sample Python code:

for item in items:
    if somecondition(item):
        requireditem = item
        break

# use item

How can I know if I'm allowed to access requireditem after the loop? i.e. if somecondition(item) was True for some item in the list.

One solution might be:

requireditem = None

for item in items:
    if somecondition(item):
        requireditem = item
        break

if requireditem != None:
    # do something

But I'm wondering what's the Pythonic way of doing this.

6
  • Does a requireditem always exist? Is there really only one? Feb 13 '11 at 19:05
  • "if requiredItem != None" should be "if not requiredItem". Feb 13 '11 at 19:07
  • 2
    @Andrea: No, it should be requiredItem is not None. Coercion to boolean considers several values that could be perfectly valid - e.g. empty collections - falsy. And singletons should be checked for with is so an __eq__ overload can't get into your way.
    – user395760
    Feb 13 '11 at 19:09
  • @Felix: there may be more than one, and it might not exist
    – jackson
    Feb 13 '11 at 19:10
  • @jackson: Then your approach is not correct anyway, as requireditem will only have a reference to one element (the last one that matches the condition). @Amber gave the best answer in this case. Feb 13 '11 at 19:13
5

Are you doing anything else in the loop? Are you setting somevar to anything besides True? If not, perhaps this would be better:

if any(somecondition(item) for item in items):
    # do something

There's no real need for a variable.

From your edit:

There's still a better way to do this:

required_items = [item for item in items if somecondition(item)]
if required_items:
    # do something
    # if only one required item is ever present, then maybe...
    required_item = required_items[0]
0
1

You can try something like this (but was your question more related to variable scoping?)

somevar = [item for item in items if somecondition(item)]

if somevar:
    do something

0
0

What you are referring to is called "variable scope".

Here is a nice article that explains it well for new programmers. http://www.digital-web.com/articles/variable_scope_for_new_programmers/

1
  • This actually has nothing to do with scoping. There's only one scope involved here. In some other languages there would be a new scope created by the loop, but that's not the case in Python.
    – kindall
    Feb 13 '11 at 19:04
0

If you really want to know if there is a way to test if the local variable exists, you can do so by handling the UnboundLocalError exception:

try:
    somevar
except UnboundLocalError:
    print "Variable does not exist"
else:
    print "Variable exists"

But this is certainly not considered "pythonic". Don't do that. Either set the variable to None beforehand or use a different approach altogether.

One solution would be to make use of Python's for-else construct:

for item in items:
   if somecondition(item):
       break
else:
   raise NoSuitableItemFound()  # If no break occurred.
1
  • No, you don't want to catch UnboundLocalError. You simply don't. Programmer hell is no jest.
    – user395760
    Feb 13 '11 at 19:04
0

For the minimum change to your code, just do whatever it is you want to do in the loop body and then break out. You should probably be breaking out on the first match anyway (unless you want to always scan the entire list and need the last item satisfying your condition).

for item in items:
    if somecondition(item):
        # do something with item
        break

However, there are better ways to do this depending on exactly what you want to do (others have posted such solutions).

0

For the edited question, you could use

try:
    requireditem = next(item for item in items if somecondition(item))
except StopIteration:
    # error handling, no item found
else:
    # do something with requireditem

This will traverse items only until the first matching item is found, in contrast to the solutions using a list comprehension.

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