3

I have two matrices, one is 200K rows long, the other is 20K. For each row (which is a point) in the first matrix, I am trying to find which row (also a point) in the second matrix is closest to the point in the first matrix. This is the first method that I tried on a sample dataset:

#Test dataset
pixels.latlon=cbind(runif(200000,min=-180, max=-120), runif(200000, min=50, max=85))
grwl.latlon=cbind(runif(20000,min=-180, max=-120), runif(20000, min=50, max=85))
#calculate the distance matrix
library(geosphere)
dist.matrix=distm(pixels.latlon, grwl.latlon, fun=distHaversine)
#Pick out the indices of the minimum distance
rnum=apply(dist.matrix, 1, which.min)

However, I get a Error: cannot allocate vector of size 30.1 Gb error when I use the distm function.

There have been several posts on this topic:

This one uses bigmemory to calculate distances between points in the SAME dataframe, but I'm not sure how to adapt it to calculate distances between points in two different matrices...https://stevemosher.wordpress.com/2012/04/12/nick-stokes-distance-code-now-with-big-memory/

This one also works for calculating a distance matrix between points in the SAME matrix...Efficient (memory-wise) function for repeated distance matrix calculations AND chunking of extra large distance matrices

And this one is pretty much identical to what I want to do, but they didn't actually come up with a solution that worked for large data: R: distm with Big Memory I tried this method, which uses bigmemory, but get a Error in CreateFileBackedBigMatrix(as.character(backingfile), as.character(backingpath), : Problem creating filebacked matrix. error, I think because the dataframe is too large.

Has anyone come up with a good solution to this problem? I am open to other package ideas!

Updated code which fixed the issue

pixels.latlon=cbind(runif(200000,min=-180, max=-120), runif(200000, min=50, max=85))
grwl.tibble = tibble(long=runif(20000,min=-180, max=-120), lat=runif(20000, min=50, max=85), id=runif(20000, min=0, max=20000))
rnum <- apply(pixels.latlon, 1, function(x) {
    xlon=x[1]
    xlat=x[2]
    grwl.filt = grwl.tibble %>% 
      filter(long < (xlon+0.3) & long >(xlon-0.3) & lat < (xlat+0.3)&lat >(xlat-.3))
    grwl.latlon.filt = cbind(grwl.filt$long, grwl.filt$lat)
    dm <- distm(x, grwl.latlon.filt, fun=distHaversine)
    rnum=apply(dm, 1, which.min)
    id = grwl.filt$id[rnum]
    return(id)
                     })
  • Do you need an efficient solution or the answer of Andrew is OK? – F. Privé Apr 16 '18 at 17:55
  • @F.Privé Andrew's way works without throwing an error (thanks Andrew)! However it does seem to be taking quite a while to run. If you know of a more efficient way, that would be great. – Ana Apr 16 '18 at 17:58
  • I think you can do at least 1000 times faster for your particular problem. The problem is with the distance. – F. Privé Apr 16 '18 at 18:06
  • That would be phenomenal. What is your recommendation? – Ana Apr 16 '18 at 18:10
  • The idea would be to have a criterion that would tell you if the distance could be inferior of what you already have. Then, you'd have to sort your data by latitute and longitude and compare only a few of same by beginning with a nice start. – F. Privé Apr 16 '18 at 18:13
7

You can use this R(cpp) function:

#include <Rcpp.h>
using namespace Rcpp;

double compute_a(double lat1, double long1, double lat2, double long2) {

  double sin_dLat = ::sin((lat2 - lat1) / 2);
  double sin_dLon = ::sin((long2 - long1) / 2);

  return sin_dLat * sin_dLat + ::cos(lat1) * ::cos(lat2) * sin_dLon * sin_dLon;
}

int find_min(double lat1, double long1,
             const NumericVector& lat2,
             const NumericVector& long2,
             int current0) {

  int m = lat2.size();
  double lat_k, lat_min, lat_max, a, a0;
  int k, current = current0;

  a0 = compute_a(lat1, long1, lat2[current], long2[current]);
  // Search before current0
  lat_min = lat1 - 2 * ::asin(::sqrt(a0));
  for (k = current0 - 1; k >= 0; k--) {
    lat_k = lat2[k];
    if (lat_k > lat_min) {
      a = compute_a(lat1, long1, lat_k, long2[k]);
      if (a < a0) {
        a0 = a;
        current = k;
        lat_min = lat1 - 2 * ::asin(::sqrt(a0));
      }
    } else {
      // No need to search further
      break;
    }
  }
  // Search after current0
  lat_max = lat1 + 2 * ::asin(::sqrt(a0));
  for (k = current0 + 1; k < m; k++) {
    lat_k = lat2[k];
    if (lat_k < lat_max) {
      a = compute_a(lat1, long1, lat_k, long2[k]);
      if (a < a0) {
        a0 = a;
        current = k;
        lat_max = lat1 + 2 * ::asin(::sqrt(a0));
      }
    } else {
      // No need to search further
      break;
    }
  }

  return current;
} 

// [[Rcpp::export]]
IntegerVector find_closest_point(const NumericVector& lat1,
                                 const NumericVector& long1,
                                 const NumericVector& lat2,
                                 const NumericVector& long2) {

  int n = lat1.size();
  IntegerVector res(n);

  int current = 0;
  for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    res[i] = current = find_min(lat1[i], long1[i], lat2, long2, current);
  }

  return res; // need +1
}


/*** R
N <- 2000  # 2e6
M <- 500   # 2e4

pixels.latlon=cbind(runif(N,min=-180, max=-120), runif(N, min=50, max=85))
grwl.latlon=cbind(runif(M,min=-180, max=-120), runif(M, min=50, max=85))
# grwl.latlon <- grwl.latlon[order(grwl.latlon[, 2]), ]

library(geosphere)
system.time({
  #calculate the distance matrix
  dist.matrix = distm(pixels.latlon, grwl.latlon, fun=distHaversine)
  #Pick out the indices of the minimum distance
  rnum=apply(dist.matrix, 1, which.min)
})


find_closest <- function(lat1, long1, lat2, long2) {

  toRad <- pi / 180
  lat1  <- lat1  * toRad
  long1 <- long1 * toRad
  lat2  <- lat2  * toRad
  long2 <- long2 * toRad

  ord1  <- order(lat1)
  rank1 <- match(seq_along(lat1), ord1)
  ord2  <- order(lat2)

  ind <- find_closest_point(lat1[ord1], long1[ord1], lat2[ord2], long2[ord2])

  ord2[ind + 1][rank1]
}

system.time(
  test <- find_closest(pixels.latlon[, 2], pixels.latlon[, 1], 
                       grwl.latlon[, 2], grwl.latlon[, 1])
)
all.equal(test, rnum)

N <- 2e4
M <- 2e4
pixels.latlon=cbind(runif(N,min=-180, max=-120), runif(N, min=50, max=85))
grwl.latlon=cbind(long = runif(M,min=-180, max=-120), lat = runif(M, min=50, max=85))
system.time(
  test <- find_closest(pixels.latlon[, 2], pixels.latlon[, 1], 
                       grwl.latlon[, 2], grwl.latlon[, 1])
)
*/

It takes 0.5 sec for N = 2e4 and 4.2 sec for N = 2e5. I can't make your code work to compare.

|improve this answer|||||
  • Apologies for the delay! Thank you for figuring out a super fast solution and all of your help. I will give it a try! – Ana Apr 17 '18 at 13:02
  • I tried it, and it works incredibly fast. Thank you for your help. – Ana Apr 17 '18 at 16:50
  • 3
    I've explained this algorithm in this blog post. – F. Privé Apr 19 '18 at 9:52
1

This would use much less memory, as it does it one row at a time, rather than creating the full distance matrix (though it will be slower)

library(geosphere)
rnum <- apply(pixels.latlon, 1, function(x) {
                     dm <- distm(x, grwl.latlon, fun=distHaversine)
                     return(which.min(dm))
                     })

Much of the time is taken up with the complicated Haversine formula. As you are really only interested in finding the closest point, not in the exact distances, we could use a simpler distance measure. Here is an alternative using a formula based on this article http://jonisalonen.com/2014/computing-distance-between-coordinates-can-be-simple-and-fast/, and also using a quadratic approximation to the cosine (which is itself expensive to calculate)...

#quadratic cosine approximation using lm (run once)
qcos <- lm(y~x+I(x^2), data.frame(x=0:90, y=cos((0:90)*2*pi/360)))$coefficients
cosadj <- function(lat) qcos[1]+lat*(qcos[2]+qcos[3]*lat)

#define rough dist function
roughDist <- function(x,y){#x should be a single (lon,lat), y a (n*2) matrix of (lon,lat)
            latDev <- x[2]-y[,2]
            lonDev <- (x[1]-y[,1])*cosadj(abs(x[2]))
            return(latDev*latDev+lonDev*lonDev) #don't need the usual square root or any scaling parameters
            }

And then you can just replace Haversine with this new function...

rnum <- apply(pixels.latlon, 1, function(x) {
                     dm <- distm(x, grwl.latlon, fun=roughDist)
                     return(which.min(dm))
                     })

On my machine this runs about three times faster than the Haversine version.

|improve this answer|||||
  • Thanks! That does work without throwing a memory error. It does seem to take quite a while to run though, so if anyone has ideas for a faster way to do this, that would be great! – Ana Apr 16 '18 at 17:59
  • @Ana I have added an alternative which is about three times faster (though not as fast as the Rcpp solution). You could perhaps combine it with your filtering approach. – Andrew Gustar Apr 17 '18 at 9:54

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