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I have a declaration of unsigned char * for the sake of an encryption key:

unsigned char *key = (unsigned char *)"0123456789012345";

I want to make it so that the key is all 0 (not the ASCII character ‘0’).


I'm a bit rusty with C, so I'm declaring it like this:

unsigned char *iv = (unsigned char *){0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0};

Which is giving me warnings, so how can I do this correctly?

marked as duplicate by Jean-François Fabre c Apr 16 at 18:39

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  • or unsigned char *iv = (unsigned char []){0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0}; but it would be very strange code. – Stargateur Apr 16 at 18:22
  • I wonder why those questions are still asked ... and answered by users with gold badge who should know better... – Jean-François Fabre Apr 16 at 18:40
  • Is the unfriendly attitude necessary? @Jean-François Fabre If it's duplicated then simply refer me to it – thestateofmay Apr 16 at 18:45
  • The unfriendly attitude is not particularly directed to you. You could have googled it, but you don't have C gold badge, so that's excusable. – Jean-François Fabre Apr 16 at 18:46
  • How about const unsigned char *key = (const unsigned char *)"\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0"; or the like? Do you want to changed key later in code? – chux Apr 16 at 18:51
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could just write

unsigned char iv[16] = { 0 };

As for this declaration

unsigned char *iv = (unsigned char *){0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0};

that tries to use a compound literal then its valid record will look like it is shown in the demonstrative program

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) 
{
    enum { N = 16 };
    unsigned char *iv = ( unsigned char[N] ){ 0 };

    for ( size_t i = 0; i < N; i++ ) printf( "%d ", iv[i] );
    putchar( '\n' );

    return 0;
}

Its output

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

You have to allocate memory for storage:

unsigned char iv [16];
memset (iv, 0, sizeof iv);

Alternatively:

unsigned char *iv = calloc (16);  // allocates and initializes to NUL
  • I believe calloc is also safer since the key won't be allocated at the same relative offset to some other variable. But note that if calloc is used, then free must also be used in most cases to avoid a memory leak. – Jeff Learman Apr 16 at 18:44

I would recommend using the memset() command.

memset(iv, 0, sizeof(*iv))

Edit: my mistake, accidentally left out the star for iv

  • 2
    that doesn't work because sizeof(iv) is the size of the pointer – Jean-François Fabre Apr 16 at 18:38
  • 1
    This is wrong because sizeof(iv) is the size of a pointer. It might be correct using sizeof(*iv), depending on how iv is defined. – Jeff Learman Apr 16 at 18:40

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