8

I have this MCVE:

auto bar() -> double { return 8.0; }

int main()
{
    if ( auto foo = bar() )
    {
        return foo;
    }
    else if ( auto foo = bar() )
    {
        return foo;
    }
}

Compiling it with gcc 7.3 and these options -c -Werror -Wextra -Wall -Wshadow generates these error messages:

test-shadow.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
test-shadow.cpp:9:17: error: declaration of ‘foo’ shadows a previous local [-Werror=shadow]
  else if ( auto foo = bar() )
                 ^~~
test-shadow.cpp:5:12: note: shadowed declaration is here
  if ( auto foo = bar() )

I don't understand why the 2nd foo is shadowing the 1st definition.

My question:

Why is gcc generating this error? In my eyes the scope of the 1st foo definition is valid only within the if block and therefore the 2nd definition is not shadowing the 1st.

  • Note that foo isn't declared within a { block scope }. It is declared within your if-statement. Where does your first if-statement end? – Drew Dormann Apr 16 '18 at 21:12
  • The scope of something declared in a condition is until the end of the substatements that are controlled by that condition. – miradulo Apr 16 '18 at 21:13
  • 4
    In other words: if (auto foo=...) -- foo is declared for the scope of the entire if statement, including the else part. And your else part declares another foo. Hence the shadowing. – Sam Varshavchik Apr 16 '18 at 21:15
13

It's basically like this:

auto bar() -> double { return 8.0; }

int main()
{
    { // start of if scope
        auto foo = bar();
        if (foo)
        {
            return foo;
        }
        else
        {
            auto foo = bar(); // this foo shadows previous foo
            if (foo)
            {
                return foo;
            }
        }
    } // end of if scope
}

Hope the code explains it :)

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