1

I can't really wrap my head around this... and I'm not sure if stacking is the right term to use here.

A.shape = (28,28,1)
B.shape = (28,28,1)

If I want to merge/add/stack these arrays to this format:

C.shape = (2,28,28,1)

How do I do this? And is it a += version of this there I can add new arrays of shape (28,28,1) into the existing stack to get (3,28,28,1).

EDIT

I have this array of 100 grayscale images: (100, 784) which I guess I can reshape to (100,28,28,1) with tf.reshape.

I want to standardize all pixel values of the 100 images with tf.image.per_image_standardization (doc), but this function accepts only input shape (h,w,ch) aka. (28,28,1).

Any suggestions on how to optimize this?

CODE

for i in range(epochs):
    for j in range(samples/batch_size):

        batch_xs, batch_ys = mnist.train.next_batch(batch_size) #(100,784)
        batch_xsr = tf.reshape(batch_xs, [-1, 28, 28, 1]) # (100,28,28,1)

        ... 

        #somehow use tf.image.per_image_standardization (input shape = 
        #(28,28,1)) on each of the 100 images, and end up with 
        #shape (100,28,28,1) again.

        ...

        _, loss = sess.run([train, loss_op], feed_dict={x: batch_xs, y: batch_ys})

Note to self: TensorFlow needs np.array in feed dict.

  • So, you want to take two arrays and if the last 3 elements are similar, then add the first two numbers together (with the default case being 1 if the array size is 3?) – ACVM Apr 16 '18 at 21:41
  • I would expect that stacking would produce a (28, 28, 2), or maybe (28, 56, 1), or something. Why the number of dimensions grows, as if a Cartesian product is being made? – 9000 Apr 16 '18 at 21:42
  • @9000, looks like he's using tensorflow (machine learning) and so, (28, 28, 1) is probably his heuristics and he probably wants to count them up? – ACVM Apr 16 '18 at 21:43
  • Thanks for the feedback, I couldn't really get it to work, so I have updated my question. @ACVM you're right, I'm trying to get a high acc. on mnist. – NorwegianClassic Apr 17 '18 at 9:54
  • 1
    Can you share your full code? – ascripter Apr 17 '18 at 10:02
2

You can use numpy's functions stack and concatenate

import numpy as np

A = np.zeros((28, 28, 1))
B = np.zeros((28, 28, 1))

C = np.stack((A, B), axis=0)

print (C.shape)

>>> (2L, 28L, 28L, 1L)

Append further arrays of shape (28, 28, 1) to an array of shape (x, 28, 28, 1) by concatenating along axis=0:

D = np.ones((28,28,1))
C = np.concatenate([C, [D]], axis=0)
#C = np.append(C, [D], axis=0)  # equivalent using np.append which is wrapper around np.concatenate

print (C.shape)

>>> (3L, 28L, 28L, 1L)

EDIT

I'm not familiar with tensorflow, but try this to normalize your images

for i in range(epochs):
    for j in range(samples/batch_size):

        batch_xs, batch_ys = mnist.train.next_batch(batch_size) #(100,784)
        batch_xsr = tf.reshape(batch_xs, [-1, 28, 28, 1]) # (100,28,28,1)

        for i_image in range(batch_xsr.shape[0]):
            batch_xsr[i_image,:,:,:] = tf.image.per_image_standardization(batch_xsr[i_image,:,:,:])

        _, loss = sess.run([train, loss_op], feed_dict={x: batch_xs, y: batch_ys})
  • I like np.stack, even though for axis=0 it behaves the same as np.array. I don't like np.append. Too many novices misuse it. I prefer that they learn to use the underlying np.concatenate`. – hpaulj Apr 16 '18 at 22:04
  • @hpaulj: I'm not aware how you can "misuse" append. Can you explain? – ascripter Apr 16 '18 at 22:06
  • 1
    Often they expect np.append to work just like the list append - in place, and relatively fast. np.append, or for that matter any version of concatenate shouldn't be used iteratively. Another error is to omit the axis, and complain that it ravels the inputs. You can see from its code that np.append doesn't add much to np.concatenate. – hpaulj Apr 16 '18 at 22:10
  • @hpaulj: Thank you, I agree and edited my post – ascripter Apr 16 '18 at 22:23
  • Thanks, I couldn't get it to work with my code, when I print C.shape after my for loop has stacked them I get (100,). I have updated my question, maybe there is a better way? – NorwegianClassic Apr 17 '18 at 9:58
3

You could go like this...

import numpy as np

A = np.zeros(shape=(28, 28, 1))
B = np.zeros(shape=(28, 28, 1))
A.shape  # (28, 28, 1)
B.shape  # (28, 28, 1)

C = np.array([A, B])

C.shape  # (2, 28, 28, 1)

Then use this to add more, assuming 'new' here is the same shape as A or B.

def add_another(C, new):
    return np.array(list(C) + [new])
  • Thanks, I couldn't really get it to work, when I print C.shape after my for loop has stacked them I get (100,). I have updated my question, maybe there is a better way? – NorwegianClassic Apr 17 '18 at 9:57

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