Have a problem, need your help. I have a data which can be treated as a panel but is a little bit different as there may be 'multiple time series' for each ID, see example below

set.seed(100)
## create data
mydf<-data.frame(ID = c(rep('A',7),rep('B',3)),
                 year =c(c(2001:2003),c(2006:2009),c(2001:2003)),
                 x = rnorm(10),
                 y = rnorm(10))

 mydf
    ID year           x           y
 1:  A 2001 -0.50219235  0.08988614
 2:  A 2002  0.13153117  0.09627446
 3:  A 2003 -0.07891709 -0.20163395
 4:  A 2006  0.88678481  0.73984050
 5:  A 2007  0.11697127  0.12337950
 6:  A 2008  0.31863009 -0.02931671
 7:  A 2009 -0.58179068 -0.38885425
 8:  B 2001  0.71453271  0.51085626
 9:  B 2002 -0.82525943 -0.91381419
10:  B 2003 -0.35986213  2.31029682

For some particular reasons, I would like to keep all the time series of each ID with at least three consecutive observations, hence may lead to multiple time series for one ID, as you can see that there are two time series of ID == A satisfy this condition. I want to create leads and lags of variables x,y.

If there is only one consecutive time series for each ID, I could simply use:

anscols.Lead1=paste("Lead.1",c('x','y'),sep="_")
mydf[,(anscols.Lead1):=shift(.SD,1,NA,type="lead"),.SDcols=c('x','y'),by=ID]

Or if I need to operate on only one column, I could also use:

tp.mydf<-pdata.frame(mydf,c("ID","year"))
tp.mydf$lag1x<-lag(tp.mydf$x)

However, with non - consecutive time series and multiple columns, data.table way won't work (result):

mydf
    ID year           x           y    Lead.1_x    Lead.1_y
 1:  A 2001 -0.50219235  0.08988614  0.13153117  0.09627446
 2:  A 2002  0.13153117  0.09627446 -0.07891709 -0.20163395
 3:  A 2003 -0.07891709 -0.20163395  0.88678481  0.73984050
 4:  A 2006  0.88678481  0.73984050  0.11697127  0.12337950
 5:  A 2007  0.11697127  0.12337950  0.31863009 -0.02931671
 6:  A 2008  0.31863009 -0.02931671 -0.58179068 -0.38885425
 7:  A 2009 -0.58179068 -0.38885425          NA          NA
 8:  B 2001  0.71453271  0.51085626 -0.82525943 -0.91381419
 9:  B 2002 -0.82525943 -0.91381419 -0.35986213  2.31029682
10:  B 2003 -0.35986213  2.31029682          NA          NA

What I want is:

mydf
    ID year           x           y    Lead.1_x    Lead.1_y
 1:  A 2001 -0.50219235  0.08988614  0.13153117  0.09627446
 2:  A 2002  0.13153117  0.09627446 -0.07891709 -0.20163395
 3:  A 2003 -0.07891709 -0.20163395          NA          NA
 4:  A 2006  0.88678481  0.73984050  0.11697127  0.12337950
 5:  A 2007  0.11697127  0.12337950  0.31863009 -0.02931671
 6:  A 2008  0.31863009 -0.02931671 -0.58179068 -0.38885425
 7:  A 2009 -0.58179068 -0.38885425          NA          NA
 8:  B 2001  0.71453271  0.51085626 -0.82525943 -0.91381419
 9:  B 2002 -0.82525943 -0.91381419 -0.35986213  2.31029682
10:  B 2003 -0.35986213  2.31029682          NA          NA

Any one know how to fix this?

================== EDIT, totaly based on Shah's answer, just for clarity for those followers to check:

mydf.newgrp<-mydf %>%
  group_by(ID, group = cumsum(c(T, diff(year) != 1))) 
setDT(mydf.newgrp)
anscols.Lead1=paste("Lead.1",c('x','y'),sep="_")
mydf.newgrp[,(anscols.Lead1):=shift(.SD,1,NA,type="lead"),.SDcols=c('x','y'),by=group]
mydf.newgrp
up vote 4 down vote accepted

With dplyr we can create a new grouping variable (group) where the difference between two year values is greater than 1. We then group by ID and group and then calculate the lead values.

library(dplyr)
mydf %>%
  group_by(ID, group = cumsum(c(T, diff(year) != 1))) %>%
  mutate(Lead_x = lead(x), Lead_y = lead(y)) %>%
  select(-group)


#   group ID     year     x       y   Lead_x   Lead_y
#   <int> <fct> <int>   <dbl>   <dbl>    <dbl>    <dbl>
# 1     1 A      2001 -0.502   0.0899   0.132    0.0963
# 2     1 A      2002  0.132   0.0963 - 0.0789 - 0.202 
# 3     1 A      2003 -0.0789 -0.202      NA       NA     
# 4     2 A      2006  0.887   0.740    0.117    0.123 
# 5     2 A      2007  0.117   0.123    0.319  - 0.0293
# 6     2 A      2008  0.319  -0.0293 - 0.582  - 0.389 
# 7     2 A      2009 -0.582  -0.389       NA       NA     
# 8     3 B      2001  0.715   0.511  - 0.825  - 0.914 
# 9     3 B      2002 -0.825  -0.914  - 0.360    2.31  
#10     3 B      2003 -0.360   2.31        NA       NA  

If there are lot of columns which we need to select we can use mutate_at

cols <- c("x", "y")
mydf %>%
   group_by(ID, group = cumsum(c(T, diff(year) != 1))) %>%
   mutate_at(cols, .funs = funs(lead = lead(.))) %>%
   select(-group)


#  group1 ID     year       x       y   x_lead   y_lead
#    <int> <fct> <int>   <dbl>   <dbl>    <dbl>    <dbl>
# 1      1 A      2001 -0.502   0.0899   0.132    0.0963
# 2      1 A      2002  0.132   0.0963 - 0.0789 - 0.202 
# 3      1 A      2003 -0.0789 -0.202       NA       NA     
# 4      2 A      2006  0.887   0.740    0.117    0.123 
# 5      2 A      2007  0.117   0.123    0.319  - 0.0293
# 6      2 A      2008  0.319  -0.0293 - 0.582  - 0.389 
# 7      2 A      2009 -0.582  -0.389       NA       NA     
# 8      3 B      2001  0.715   0.511  - 0.825  - 0.914 
# 9      3 B      2002 -0.825  -0.914  - 0.360    2.31  
#10      3 B      2003 -0.360   2.31        NA       NA    

The output of grouping variable group comes out to be

cumsum(c(T, diff(mydf$year) != 1)) 
#[1] 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3
  • @Shah great, I was thinking about creating new groups but stuck with how to do it. Any thought on how to simplify your answer if one has one hundred columns to manipulate, i.e. mutate(a hundred columns here)? – Jason Goal Apr 17 at 4:14
  • @JasonGoal I have updated the solution. Let me know if that helps. – Ronak Shah Apr 17 at 4:29
  • @Shah, not all the remaining columns, and given speed and convenience of data.table, I'll combine your method with data.table solution, for clarity, I put them in the question part. And will accept yours as answer. – Jason Goal Apr 17 at 4:29
  • @Shah, together with the updated solution, yours solved my question totally. – Jason Goal Apr 17 at 5:14

With data.table, we can change the by to include the grouping variable

library(data.table)
setDT(mydf)[, paste0("Lead.1_", names(mydf)[3:4]) := 
    shift(.SD, type = 'lead'), by = .(ID, cumsum(year - shift(year, fill = year[1]) != 1))]
mydf
#    ID year           x           y    Lead.1_x    Lead.1_y
# 1:  A 2001 -0.50219235  0.08988614  0.13153117  0.09627446
# 2:  A 2002  0.13153117  0.09627446 -0.07891709 -0.20163395
# 3:  A 2003 -0.07891709 -0.20163395          NA          NA
# 4:  A 2006  0.88678481  0.73984050  0.11697127  0.12337950
# 5:  A 2007  0.11697127  0.12337950  0.31863009 -0.02931671
# 6:  A 2008  0.31863009 -0.02931671 -0.58179068 -0.38885425
# 7:  A 2009 -0.58179068 -0.38885425          NA          NA
# 8:  B 2001  0.71453271  0.51085626 -0.82525943 -0.91381419
# 9:  B 2002 -0.82525943 -0.91381419 -0.35986213  2.31029682
#10:  B 2003 -0.35986213  2.31029682          NA          NA

If there are other columns that are doesn't need to be shifted, we can specify the .SDcols

nm1 <- names(mydf)[3:4]
setDT(mydf)[, paste0("Lead.1_", nm1) := 
    shift(.SD, type = 'lead'), 
   by = .(ID, cumsum(year - shift(year, fill = year[1]) != 1)), .SDcols = nm1]
  • 1
    Shah's solution came earlier than yours and it did solve my major problem, that's I why I took that one as the answer. But your stuff is something really cool to me, never aware that kind of manipulation of the by argument in data.table. And two lines less than what I posted. Really cool, I recommend this way. – Jason Goal Apr 17 at 4:40
  • @JasonGoal No problem. I think the credit should be to RonakShah's solution. I was just using similar methodology to implement in data.table – akrun Apr 17 at 4:41

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.