66

In Flutter, is there a way to update widgets when the user leaves the app and come right back to it? My app is time based, and it would be helpful to update the time as soon as it can.

8 Answers 8

113

You can listen to lifecycle events by doing this for example :

import 'package:flutter/material.dart';
import 'package:flutter/foundation.dart';

class LifecycleEventHandler extends WidgetsBindingObserver {
  final AsyncCallback resumeCallBack;
  final AsyncCallback suspendingCallBack;

  LifecycleEventHandler({
    this.resumeCallBack,
    this.suspendingCallBack,
  });

  @override
  Future<void> didChangeAppLifecycleState(AppLifecycleState state) async {
    switch (state) {
      case AppLifecycleState.resumed:
        if (resumeCallBack != null) {
          await resumeCallBack();
        }
        break;
      case AppLifecycleState.inactive:
      case AppLifecycleState.paused:
      case AppLifecycleState.detached:
        if (suspendingCallBack != null) {
          await suspendingCallBack();
        }
        break;
    }
  }
}



class AppWidgetState extends State<AppWidget> {
  void initState() {
    super.initState();

    WidgetsBinding.instance.addObserver(
      LifecycleEventHandler(resumeCallBack: () async => setState(() {
        // do something
      }))
    );
  }
  ...
}
16
  • 1
    I'm just wondering, can you add a WidgetsBindingObserver to a StatelessWidget? Thanks.
    – Josh
    Apr 17, 2018 at 6:10
  • Sure, but what do you want to do when such a lifecycle event happens? Apr 17, 2018 at 6:15
  • 1
    You can put above code everywhere. It doesn't have to be inside a widget. That was just an example. Apr 17, 2018 at 6:33
  • 2
    Where is FutureVoidCallback defined? I can't find it in the flutter package source and google is not helping either? Apr 1, 2019 at 22:47
  • 2
    @ChrisCrowe you are right. You need to declare it yourself. typedef FutureVoidCallback = Future<void> Function(); Apr 2, 2019 at 3:50
26

Using system Channel:

import 'package:flutter/services.dart';

SystemChannels.lifecycle.setMessageHandler((msg){
  debugPrint('SystemChannels> $msg');
  if(msg==AppLifecycleState.resumed.toString())setState((){});
});

`

5
  • 5
    This may be obvious to others, but it took me a while to figure out I needed to move this to a location after the Flutter runApp call.
    – edhubbell
    Jul 11, 2018 at 13:39
  • do we put this code into initState()? The systemChannels will act like a listener to listener to the change of lifecycle?
    – GPH
    Oct 8, 2018 at 8:57
  • What is the type of the msg variable? Why is it not of type AppLifecycleState?
    – Scorb
    Jul 29, 2020 at 15:30
  • 1
    @edhubbell from the docs If you need the binding to be constructed before calling runApp, you can ensure a Widget binding has been constructed by calling the WidgetsFlutterBinding.ensureInitialized() function.
    – mx1up
    Nov 13, 2020 at 16:57
  • This is a good solution, unfortunately if you set the handler for these channels to your own implementations, you will no longer receive notifications for WidgetsBindingObserver, as they rely on these message handlers to work. For instance, didChangeAppLifecycleState will no longer be called.
    – guillaume
    Jan 21 at 9:43
17

Simple way:

import 'package:flutter/services.dart';

handleAppLifecycleState() {
    AppLifecycleState _lastLifecyleState;
    SystemChannels.lifecycle.setMessageHandler((msg) {

     print('SystemChannels> $msg');

        switch (msg) {
          case "AppLifecycleState.paused":
            _lastLifecyleState = AppLifecycleState.paused;
            break;
          case "AppLifecycleState.inactive":
            _lastLifecyleState = AppLifecycleState.inactive;
            break;
          case "AppLifecycleState.resumed":
            _lastLifecyleState = AppLifecycleState.resumed;
            break;
          case "AppLifecycleState.suspending":
            _lastLifecyleState = AppLifecycleState.suspending;
            break;
          default:
        }
    });
  }

just add handleAppLifecycleState() in your init()

OR

class AppLifecycleReactor extends StatefulWidget {
      const AppLifecycleReactor({ Key key }) : super(key: key);

      @override
      _AppLifecycleReactorState createState() => _AppLifecycleReactorState();
    }

    class _AppLifecycleReactorState extends State<AppLifecycleReactor> with WidgetsBindingObserver {
      @override
      void initState() {
        super.initState();
        WidgetsBinding.instance.addObserver(this);
      }

      @override
      void dispose() {
        WidgetsBinding.instance.removeObserver(this);
        super.dispose();
      }

      AppLifecycleState _notification;

      @override
      void didChangeAppLifecycleState(AppLifecycleState state) {
        setState(() { _notification = state; });
      }

      @override
      Widget build(BuildContext context) {
        return Text('Last notification: $_notification');
      }
    }

For more details you refer documentation

0
17

For deeply testing, I think the results are worth for read. If you are curious about which method you should use, just read the below: (Tested on Android)

There are three methods for LifeCycle solution.

  1. WidgetsBindingObserver
  2. SystemChannels.lifecycle
  3. flutter-android-lifecycle-plugin

The main difference between WidgetsBindingObserver and SystemChannels.lifecycle is that WidgetsBindingObserver have more capables If you have a bunch of widgets that need to listen LifeCycle. SystemChannels is more low layer, and used by WidgetsBindingObserver.

After several testing, If you use SystemChannels after runApp, and home widget mixin with WidgetsBindingObserver, home widget would be failed, because SystemChannels.lifecycle.setMessageHandler override the home's method.

So If you want to use a global, single method, go for SystemChannels.lifecycle, others for WidgetsBindingObserver.

And what about the third method? This is only for Android, and If you must bind your method before runApp, this is the only way to go.

2
  • 1
    If SystemChannels.lifecycle is used then WidgetsBindingObserver callbacks are not received.
    – Sp4Rx
    Jul 18, 2019 at 13:39
  • Plus one for detail
    – rufw91
    Feb 24, 2020 at 7:12
17
import 'package:flutter/material.dart';

abstract class LifecycleWatcherState<T extends StatefulWidget> extends State<T>
    with WidgetsBindingObserver {
  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return null;
  }

  @override
  void initState() {
    super.initState();
    WidgetsBinding.instance.addObserver(this);
  }

  @override
  void dispose() {
    WidgetsBinding.instance.removeObserver(this);
    super.dispose();
  }

  @override
  void didChangeAppLifecycleState(AppLifecycleState state) {
    switch (state) {
      case AppLifecycleState.resumed:
        onResumed();
        break;
      case AppLifecycleState.inactive:
        onPaused();
        break;
      case AppLifecycleState.paused:
        onInactive();
        break;
      case AppLifecycleState.detached:
        onDetached();
        break;
    }
  }

  void onResumed();
  void onPaused();
  void onInactive();
  void onDetached();
}

Example

class ExampleStatefulWidget extends StatefulWidget {
  @override
  _ExampleStatefulWidgetState createState() => _ExampleStatefulWidgetState();
}

class _ExampleStatefulWidgetState
    extends LifecycleWatcherState<ExampleStatefulWidget> {
  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return Container();
  }

  @override
  void onDetached() {

  }

  @override
  void onInactive() {

  }

  @override
  void onPaused() {

  }

  @override
  void onResumed() {

  }
}
5

Here’s an example of how to observe the lifecycle status of the containing activity (Flutter for Android developers):

import 'package:flutter/widgets.dart';

class LifecycleWatcher extends StatefulWidget {
  @override
  _LifecycleWatcherState createState() => _LifecycleWatcherState();
}

class _LifecycleWatcherState extends State<LifecycleWatcher> with WidgetsBindingObserver {
  AppLifecycleState _lastLifecycleState;

  @override
  void initState() {
    super.initState();
    WidgetsBinding.instance.addObserver(this);
  }

  @override
  void dispose() {
    WidgetsBinding.instance.removeObserver(this);
    super.dispose();
  }

  @override
  void didChangeAppLifecycleState(AppLifecycleState state) {
    setState(() {
      _lastLifecycleState = state;
    });
  }

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    if (_lastLifecycleState == null)
      return Text('This widget has not observed any lifecycle changes.', textDirection: TextDirection.ltr);

    return Text('The most recent lifecycle state this widget observed was: $_lastLifecycleState.',
        textDirection: TextDirection.ltr);
  }
}

void main() {
  runApp(Center(child: LifecycleWatcher()));
}
2

Solutions implemented for detecting onResume event using "WidgetsBindingObserver" OR "SystemChannels.lifecycle" works only when App is gone in background completely like during lock screen event or during switching to another app. It will not work if user navigate between screens of app. If you want to detect onResume event even when switching between different screens of same app then use visibility_detector library from here : https://pub.dev/packages/visibility_detector

  @override
Widget build(BuildContext context) {
  return VisibilityDetector(
    key: Key('my-widget-key'),
    onVisibilityChanged: (visibilityInfo) {
      num visiblePercentage = visibilityInfo.visibleFraction * 100;
      debugPrint(
          'Widget ${visibilityInfo.key} is ${visiblePercentage}% visible');
      if(visiblePercentage == 100){
                debugPrint("Resumed !");
              }
    },
    child: someOtherWidget,
  );
}
1
  • it solved my problem, Thanks
    – abdulec90
    Feb 10 at 15:28
0

If you want to execute onResume method but only in one page you can add this in your page:

var lifecycleEventHandler;

@override
  void initState() {
    super.initState();

    ///To listen onResume method
    lifecycleEventHandler = LifecycleEventHandler(
        resumeCallBack: () async {
          //do something
        }
    );
    WidgetsBinding.instance.addObserver(lifecycleEventHandler);
  }

@override
  void dispose() {
    if(lifecycleEventHandler != null)
      WidgetsBinding.instance.removeObserver(lifecycleEventHandler);

    super.dispose();
  }

and having LifecycleEventHandler class as the first answer of this post:

import 'package:flutter/material.dart';
import 'package:flutter/foundation.dart';

class LifecycleEventHandler extends WidgetsBindingObserver {
  final AsyncCallback resumeCallBack;
  final AsyncCallback suspendingCallBack;

  LifecycleEventHandler({
    this.resumeCallBack,
    this.suspendingCallBack,
  });

  @override
  Future<void> didChangeAppLifecycleState(AppLifecycleState state) async {
    switch (state) {
      case AppLifecycleState.resumed:
        if (resumeCallBack != null) {
          await resumeCallBack();
        }
        break;
      case AppLifecycleState.inactive:
      case AppLifecycleState.paused:
      case AppLifecycleState.detached:
        if (suspendingCallBack != null) {
          await suspendingCallBack();
        }
        break;
    }
  }
}

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