This is the function i made:

void loading(bool wsound) {

if (wsound = true)
{

    PlaySound(TEXT("sounds/intro.wav"), NULL, SND_ASYNC);
    cout << "..........";
    Sleep(1000);
    cout << "..........";
    Sleep(1000);
    cout << "..........";
    Sleep(1000);
    cout << "..........";
    Sleep(1000);
    cout << "..........";
    Sleep(1000);
    cout << ".........." << endl;
    Sleep(1000);

}
else if (wsound = false)
{
    cout << "..........";
    Sleep(1000);
    cout << "..........";
    Sleep(1000);
    cout << ".........." << endl;

}
else {

    cout << "An error occured" << endl;


    cin.get();
        system("exit");

    }
}

so what this basically does is that it takes a bool if the value is true then it loads it with sounds if false then it loads it without sounds.

My problem is that in the main i placed a bool with the value of true then it worked though after calling it again with the value type of false it still loads it with sounds.

the code is like this:

//a bunch of code here 
loading(true);
//a bunch of code here
loading(false);
//and more codes.........

closed as off-topic by Some programmer dude, user463035818, liliscent, Baum mit Augen, FallenAngel Apr 17 at 6:52

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – Some programmer dude, user463035818, liliscent, Baum mit Augen, FallenAngel
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    You do know the difference between assignment (using =) and comparison for equality (with ==)? If you take some time to learn how to debug your programs (which all programmers should know!) then you would have found out the problem quite quickly. – Some programmer dude Apr 17 at 6:17
  • if (wsound = true) is always true. – Stan Apr 17 at 6:18
  • yes the first one assigns and the second one compares, just a tiny mistake ill try to use == – Mr.Shaking Apr 17 at 6:19
  • @Mr.Shaking What value of wsound passes the control to the else statement bypassing if ( wsound == true ) and else if (wsound == false )? – Vlad from Moscow Apr 17 at 6:24
up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is not a check, this is an assignment: wsound = true

You should use something like wsound == true, however in an if statement it is enough to only use if (wsound), which is equal to if (wsound == true). For the false check you could use: if(!wsound).

EDIT: To understand what happens: if(wsound = true) is a correct statement, because the assignment operator=(), used in this if statement, should in the most cases return a non-cost reference to the variable, which is already explained here.

  • already solved it in the comments but still thank you – Mr.Shaking Apr 17 at 6:23
  • 1
    for the sake of completeness you should also explain why if (wsound = true) does not produce an error and how to enable warnings – user463035818 Apr 17 at 6:41

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