4

I'm porting a JavaScript library to Ruby, and have come across the following insanity (heavily abbreviated):

function foo(){
  if (foo) ...
  loop:
    while(go()){
      if (...) break;
      switch(...){
        case a:
          break loop;  
        case b:
        case c:
          if (...) break loop;
          ...
          break;
        case d:
          if (...) break loop;
          // fall through
        case e:
          if (...) break loop;
          ...
          break;    
        case f:
          if (...) break loop;
          object_init:
            do{
              switch(...){
                case a:
                  ...
                  break;
                case b:
                  ...
                  break object_init;        
              }
            } while(...);              
            ...
            break;
      }
    }
}

(You can view the full horror on lines 701-1006.)

How would you rewrite this in Ruby? Specifically:

  • Handling the intermixed break and break loop, and
  • Handling the occasional "fall throughs" that occur in the switch

Presumably a good general strategy for these will get me through other situations, like the nested object_init breaking that also occurs.

Edit: How silly of me; a JavaScript "fall through" like this:

switch(xxx){
  case a:
    aaa;
  case b:
    bbb;
  break;
}

can easily be rewritten in Ruby as:

case xxx
  when a, b
    if a===xxx
      aaa
    end
    bbb
end
2

1 Answer 1

4

There are multiple techniques that will work for this.

  1. I'm sure this has already occurred to you, but for the record, you could extract methods from the nightmare function until its structure looks more reasonable.

  2. You could define the outer loops with lambda and then immediately call them on the next line. This will allow you to use the return statement as a multi-level break and the closure that is created will allow you to still access the outer scope variables.

  3. You could raise an exception and rescue it.

  4. (Added by Phrogz) As suggested in the answer linked by @jleedev, you can use throw/catch, e.g.

    catch(:loop) do
      case ...
        when a
          throw :loop
        when b, c
          throw :loop if ...
        ...
      end
    end
    
3
  • There are some tricky things to look out for with #2. If any of the loops within the lambda block are implemented with Proc objects, a return inside one of those will return from your entire surrounding method, not just the lambda. So, for example, that means you cannot iterate inside the lamba with something like 5.times do ... end unless that one loop doesn't use return. Feb 14, 2011 at 1:41
  • Failing any further answers, I'll accept this. I suggest that this would be even better if you include throw/catch in your list of techniques.
    – Phrogz
    Feb 19, 2011 at 2:18
  • I've added the throw/catch answer. Feel free to re-edit your answer to include it as you would like to word it and throw my name out of your answer.
    – Phrogz
    Feb 19, 2011 at 2:21

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.