1

I came across some confusing code, and I don't know what it signifies:

found &= pattern[j] == *(char*)(base + i + j);

I've tried rewriting it, and this is what I've made so far:

if (pattern[j] == *(char*)(base + i + j))
{
  found = found & pattern[j];
}

For context, the full snippet:

DWORD FindPattern(char *module, char *pattern)
{
  MODULEINFO mInfo = GetModuleInfo(module);

  /*typedef struct _MODULEINFO {
    LPVOID lpBaseOfDll;
    DWORD  SizeOfImage;
    LPVOID EntryPoint;
  } MODULEINFO, *LPMODULEINFO;*/

  DWORD base = (DWORD)mInfo.lpBaseOfDll;
  DWORD size = (DWORD)mInfo.SizeOfImage;
  DWORD EntryPoint = (DWORD)mInfo.EntryPoint;
  HANDLE han = GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE);

  DWORD patternLength = (DWORD)strlen(pattern);

  AllocConsole();
  FILE* fp;
  freopen_s(&fp, "CONOUT$", "w", stdout);
  printf("로드주소: %p\n", base);//0x400000
  printf("사이즈: %08X\n", size);//0x13F000
  printf("엔트리포인트: %p\n",EntryPoint);//0x4B8F6B
  printf("옵코드 주소: %p\n", *pattern);
  printf("옵코드 길이: %08x\n", patternLength);//0x11

  //프로세스에서 옵코드를 뺀 만큼 반복
  for (DWORD i = 0; i < size - patternLength; i++)//0x13F000-0x11 = 13EFEF
  {
    bool found = true;
    for (DWORD j = 0; j < patternLength; j++)
    {
      found &= pattern[j] == *(char*)(base + i + j);
      /*if (pattern[j] == *(char*)(base + i + j))
      {
        found = found & pattern[j];
      }*/
    }

    if (found)
      return base + i;
  }
  return 0xDEADBEEF;
}
  • 6
    No, it's not the same. If the equality comparison is ever false, that evaluates to 0 in numerical context. And, as you know, 0 & anything is 0. So, once the comparison evaluates to false, found gets set to 0, and can never be non-0 again. The shown code is sloppy, and keeps waffling back between boolean and numerical context, and confuses boolean versus logical operators. It's not surprising that it can be a little bit confusing to decipher. – Sam Varshavchik Apr 17 '18 at 15:28
3

and is it the same code as below?

No its is not the same, that code is logically equal to:

if( pattern[j] == *(char *)(base + i + j) ) found = found & 1;
else found = 0; // or found = found & 0; which has the same effect
1

To make the statement more clear in fact this code snippet

bool found = true;
for (DWORD j = 0; j < patternLength; j++)
{
    found &= pattern[j] == *(char*)(base + i + j);
    /*if (pattern[j] == *(char*)(base + i + j))
    {
        found = found & pattern[j];
    }*/
}

if (found)
    return base + i;

can be rewritten the following way

bool found = true;
for (DWORD j = 0; found && j < patternLength; j++)
{
    if ( pattern[j] != *(char*)(base + i + j) )
    {
        found = false;
    }
}

if (found)
    return base + i;

Or like

bool found = true;
for (DWORD j = 0; found && j < patternLength; j++)
{
    found = pattern[j] == *(char*)(base + i + j) )
}

if (found)
    return base + i;

So when pattern[j] != *(char*)(base + i + j) then it means that the expression

pattern[j] == *(char*)(base + i + j)

yields 0 and found &= 0 results in found is set to 0.

I have wriiten the condition of the loop like

found && j < patternLength

because it does not make sense to continue the loop when it is already known that there are unequal characters.

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