363

If I have a function which accepts more than one string parameter, the first parameter seems to get all the data assigned to it, and remaining parameters are passed in as empty.

A quick test script:

Function Test([string]$arg1, [string]$arg2)
{
    Write-Host "`$arg1 value: $arg1"
    Write-Host "`$arg2 value: $arg2"
}

Test("ABC", "DEF")

The output generated is

$arg1 value: ABC DEF
$arg2 value: 

The correct output should be:

$arg1 value: ABC
$arg2 value: DEF

This seems to be consistent between v1 and v2 on multiple machines, so obviously, I'm doing something wrong. Can anyone point out exactly what?

  • You just call like this: Test "ABC" "DEF" – Ranadip Dutta Feb 17 '17 at 5:54

14 Answers 14

488

Parameters in calls to functions in PowerShell (all versions) are space-separated, not comma separated. Also, the parentheses are entirely unneccessary and will cause a parse error in PowerShell 2.0 (or later) if Set-StrictMode is active. Parenthesised arguments are used in .NET methods only.

function foo($a, $b, $c) {
   "a: $a; b: $b; c: $c"
}

ps> foo 1 2 3
a: 1; b: 2; c: 3
  • 3
    I knew it was me :-) Thanks. – Nasir Feb 14 '11 at 2:08
  • 14
    Most important thing that has finally helped 'stick' this in my mind is the last sentence: "Parenthesised arguments are used in .NET Methods only." – Ashley Steel Dec 12 '13 at 17:25
  • I prefer using the paranthesis and comma separated.. is it possible to do this in powershell? – sam yi Mar 19 '14 at 4:27
  • 6
    @samyi No. Passing a (1,2,3) to a function is effectively treated as an array; a single argument. If you want to use OO method style arguments, use modules: $m = new-module -ascustomobject { function Add($x,$y) { $x + $y } }; $m.Add(1,1) – x0n Mar 19 '14 at 13:18
  • 25
    Powershell... Just HAS TO BE DIFFERENT... – Jmoney38 Oct 21 '16 at 19:56
233

The correct answer has already been provided but this issue seems prevalent enough to warrant some additional details for those wanting to understand the subtleties. I would have added this just as a comment but I wanted to include an illustration--I tore this off my quick reference chart on PowerShell functions. This assumes function f's signature is f($a, $b, $c):

syntax pitfalls of a function call

Thus, one can call a function with space-separated positional parameters or order-independent named parameters. The other pitfalls reveal that you need to be cognizant of commas, parentheses, and white space.

For further reading see my article Down the Rabbit Hole: A Study in PowerShell Pipelines, Functions, and Parameters just published on Simple-Talk.com. The article contains a link to the quick reference/wall chart as well.

  • 2
    The explanation with the more verbose syntax calling each parameter and assigning it a value really cemented it in. Thanks! – ConstantineK Dec 15 '13 at 0:28
  • 6
    Thank you, it was driving me mental not understanding what I was doing wrong. When I finally did it right I was hungry for an explanation of this behaviour. – BSAFH Aug 26 '14 at 3:53
  • great explanation! picture is worth thousands words – Andrzej Martyna Feb 4 '15 at 10:43
  • 2
    This is a far better answer. It should be further up. – Mark Bertenshaw Apr 16 '16 at 11:39
  • 2
    Why'd you tear such a great reference chart? – Twisty Impersonator May 5 '17 at 1:58
41

You call PowerShell functions without the parenthesis and without using the comma as a separator. Try using:

   test "ABC" "DEF"

In PowerShell the comma (,) is an array operator, e.g.

   $a = "one", "two", "three"

It sets $a to an array with three values.

  • thanks for the quick reply. – Nasir Feb 14 '11 at 2:09
32

Some good answers here, but I wanted to point out a couple other things. Function parameters are actually a place where PowerShell shines. For example, you can have either named or positional parameters in advanced functions like so:

function Get-Something
{
    Param
    (
         [Parameter(Mandatory=$true, Position=0)]
         [string] $Name,
         [Parameter(Mandatory=$true, Position=1)]
         [int] $Id
    )
}

Then you could either call it by specifying the parameter name, or you could just use positional parameters, since you explicitly defined them. So either of these would work:

Get-Something -Id 34 -Name "Blah" 
Get-Something "Blah" 34

The first example works even though Name is provided second, because we explicitly used the parameter name. The second example works based on position though, so Name would need to be first. When possible, I always try to define positions so both options are available.

PowerShell also has the ability to define parameter sets. It uses this in place of method overloading, and again is quite useful:

function Get-Something
{
    [CmdletBinding(DefaultParameterSetName='Name')]
    Param
    (
         [Parameter(Mandatory=$true, Position=0, ParameterSetName='Name')]
         [string] $Name,
         [Parameter(Mandatory=$true, Position=0, ParameterSetName='Id')]
         [int] $Id
    )
}

Now the function will either take a name, or an id, but not both. You can use them positionally, or by name. Since they are a different type, PowerShell will figure it out. So all of these would work

Get-Something "some name"
Get-Something 23
Get-Something -Name "some name"
Get-Something -Id 23

You can also assign additional parameters to the various parameter sets. (That was a pretty basic example obviously) Inside of the function, you can determine which parameter set was used with the $PsCmdlet.ParameterSetName property. For example:

if($PsCmdlet.ParameterSetName -eq "Name")
{
    Write-Host "Doing something with name here"
}

Then, on a related side note, there is also parameter validation in PowerShell. This is one of my favorite PowerShell features, and it makes the code inside your functions very clean. There are numerous validations you can use. A couple examples are

function Get-Something
{
    Param
    (
         [Parameter(Mandatory=$true, Position=0)]
         [ValidatePattern('^Some.*')]
         [string] $Name,
         [Parameter(Mandatory=$true, Position=1)]
         [ValidateRange(10,100)]
         [int] $Id
    )
}

In the first example, ValidatePattern accepts a regular expression that assures the supplied parameter matches what you're expecting. If it doesn't, an intuitive exception is thrown, telling you exactly what is wrong. So in that example, 'Something' would work fine, but 'Summer' wouldn't pass validation.

ValidateRange ensures that the parameter value is in between the range you expect for an integer. So 10 or 99 would work, but 101 would throw an exception.

Another useful one is ValidateSet, which allows you to explicitly define an array of acceptable values. If something else is entered, an exception will be thrown. There are others as well, but probably the most useful one is ValidateScript. This takes a script block that must evaluate to $true, so the sky is the limit. For example:

function Get-Something
{
    Param
    (
         [Parameter(Mandatory=$true, Position=0)]
         [ValidateScript({ Test-Path $_ -PathType 'Leaf' })]
         [ValidateScript({ (Get-Item $_ | select -Expand Extension) -eq ".csv" })]
         [string] $Path
    )
}

In this example, we are assured not only that $Path exists, but that it is a file, (as opposed to a directory) and has a .csv extension. ($_ refers to the parameter, when inside your scriptblock.) You can also pass in much larger, multi-line script blocks if that level is required, or use multiple scriptblocks like I did here. It's extremely useful, and makes for nice clean functions and intuitive exceptions.

  • 2
    +1 for demonstrating My_Function -NamedParamater "ParamValue" function call style. This is a pattern that more PS script code should follow for readability. – Mister_Tom Nov 22 '17 at 19:46
13
Function Test([string]$arg1, [string]$arg2)
{
    Write-Host "`$arg1 value: $arg1"
    Write-Host "`$arg2 value: $arg2"
}

Test "ABC" "DEF"
10

If you're a C# / Java / C++ / Ruby / Python / Pick-A-Language-From-This-Century developer and you want to call your function with commas, because that's what you've always done, then you need something like this:

$myModule = new-module -ascustomobject { 
    function test($arg1, $arg2) { 
        echo "arg1 = $arg1, and arg2 = $arg2"
    }
}

Now call:

$myModule.test("ABC", "DEF")

and you'll see

arg1 = ABC, and arg2 = DEF
5

If you don't know (or care) how many arguments you will be passing to the function, you could also use a very simple approach like;

Code:

function FunctionName()
{
    Write-Host $args
}

That would print out all arguments. For example:

FunctionName a b c 1 2 3

Output

a b c 1 2 3

I find this particularly useful when creating functions that use external commands that could have many different (and optional) parameters, but relies on said command to provide feedback on syntax errors etc.

Here is a another real-world example (creating a function to the tracert command, which I hate having to remember the truncated name);

Code:

Function traceroute
{
    Start-Process -FilePath "$env:systemroot\system32\tracert.exe" -ArgumentList $args -NoNewWindow
}
5

If you try:

PS > Test("ABC", "GHI") ("DEF")

you get:

$arg1 value: ABC GHI
$arg2 value: DEF

so you see that the parenthesis separates the parameters

If you try:

PS > $var = "C"
PS > Test ("AB" + $var) "DEF"

you get:

$arg1 value: ABC
$arg2 value: DEF

Now you could find some immediate usefulness of the parenthesis - a space will not become a separator for the next parameter - instead you have an eval function.

  • 3
    Parens don't separate parameters. They define array. – n0rd Oct 12 '13 at 19:16
  • Parens don't define an array, they define a group, which powershell can interpret as an array. Arrays are defined with an at sign (@) before the leading paren, like this empty array: @(); or this array with two numbers: @(1, 2). – VertigoRay Mar 11 at 22:14
3

I don't know what you're doing with the function, but have a look at using the 'param' keyword. It's quite a bit more powerful for passing parameters into a function, and makes it more user friendly. Below is a link to an overly complex article from Microsoft about it. It isn't as complicated as the article makes it sound. Param Usage

Also, here is an example from a thread on this site:

Check it out.

  • Thanks for the answer. However, I was having issues when calling the function. Didn't matter if the function was declared with param or without it. – Nasir Feb 16 '11 at 14:08
2
Function Test([string]$arg1, [string]$arg2)
{
    Write-Host "`$arg1 value: $arg1"
    Write-Host "`$arg2 value: $arg2"
}

Test("ABC") ("DEF")
  • The the result will come out as it should: – user3222697 Jan 22 '14 at 8:52
2

Because this is a frequent viewed question I want to mention that a PowerShell function should use approved verbs (Verb-Noun as the function name). Also you can specify things like whether the parameter is mandatory and the position of the parameter:

function Test-Script
{
    [CmdletBinding()]
    Param
    (
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$true, Position=0)]
        [string]$arg1,

        [Parameter(Mandatory=$true, Position=1)]
        [string]$arg2
    )

    Write-Host "`$arg1 value: $arg1"
    Write-Host "`$arg2 value: $arg2"
}

To pass the parameter to the function you can either use the position:

Test-Script "Hello" "World"

Or you specify the parameter name:

Test-Script -arg1 "Hello" -arg2 "World"

You don't use parentheses like you do when you call a function within C#.


I would recommend to always pass the parameter names when using more then one parameter, since this is more readable.

1

I states the following earlier:

The common problem is using the singular form $arg, which is incorrect.
It should always be plural as $args.

The problem is not that.
In fact, $arg can be anything else. The problem was the use of the comma and the parantheses.
I run the following code that worked and the output follows:

Code:

Function Test([string]$var1, [string]$var2)
{
    Write-Host "`$var1 value: $var1"
    Write-Host "`$var2 value: $var2"
}

Test "ABC" "DEF"

Output:

$var1 value: ABC $var2 value: DEF

  • 3
    Thank you my friend, however, you're a couple of years late :-) The top three answers here had sufficiently addressed the issue. May I suggest heading over to Unanswered section and trying some of those questions? – Nasir Nov 8 '13 at 13:49
1
Function Test {
 Param([string]$arg1, [string]$arg2)
    Write-Host $arg1
    Write-Host $arg2
}

This is proper params declaration https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd347600.aspx

And it indeed works

0

You can pass parameters in function like this also.

function FunctionName()
{
    Param ([string]$ParamName);
    #Operations
}
  • 2
    That would be defining parameters for a function, the original question was about how to specify parameters when you call the function. – Nasir May 15 '16 at 22:07

protected by briantist Dec 14 '18 at 16:57

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