12

I am trying to understand the syntactic difference between composition and inheritance in C++.

I'm hoping someone will provide two simple examples. One example of a class that uses composition and one of a class that uses inheritance.

0
23

Sure, why not? Since I like robots, let's make a robot that can walk around and grab things. We'll make one robot using inheritance, and another robot using composition:

class Legs
{
public:
   void WalkAround() {... code for walking around goes here...}
};

class Arms
{
public:
   void GrabThings() {... code for grabbing things goes here...}
};

class InheritanceRobot : public Legs, public Arms
{
public:
   // WalkAround() and GrabThings() methods are implicitly
   // defined for this class since it inherited those
   // methods from its two superclasses
};

class CompositionRobot
{
public:
   void WalkAround() {legs.WalkAround();}
   void GrabThings() {arms.GrabThings();}

private:
   Legs legs;
   Arms arms;
};

Note that at least for this example, the CompositionRobot is usually considered to be the better approach, since inheritance implies an is-a relationship, and a robot isn't a particular kind of Arms and a robot isn't a particular kind of Legs (rather a robot has-arms and has-legs).

11

To expand a little on @jeremy-friesner's answer (and mostly reuse his code), a lot of the time composition is implemented using more classes than that. Essentially the Legs and Arms classes would be implementations of an interface. This makes it easy to inject those dependencies and, hence, mock/stub them out when unit testing the composite object. Then you'd have something like (ignoring virtual destructor...) :

class Walker // interface
{
public:
    virtual void Walk() = 0;
}

class Legs : public Walker
{
public:
    void Walk() {... code for walking around goes here...}
}

class Grabber // Interface
{
public:
    virtual void GrabThings() = 0;
}

class Arms : public Grabber
{
public:
    void GrabThings() {... code for grabbing things goes here...}
}

class InheritanceRobot : public Legs, public Arms
{
public:
    // Walk() and GrabThings() methods are implicitly
    // defined for this class since it inherited those
    // methods from its two superclasses
};

class CompositionRobot
{
public:
    CompositionRobot(Walker& walker, Grabber& grabber) 
        : legs(walker), 
          arms(grabber) 
    {} 
    void Walk() {legs.Walk();}
    void GrabThings() {arms.GrabThings();}

private:
    Walker& legs;
    Grabber& arms;
};

So the actual implementation used for legs and arms could be set at run-time instead of compile time.

As an aside, I only wrote this as an answer, rather than a comment on Jeremy's answer, to benefit from the code formatting so, if you feel like up-voting it, please do Jeremy's too.

HTH

UPDATE Sep 14, 2021:

One thing I've noticed in this answer is that I've conflated composition and aggregation. In composition, if the parent object ceases to exist, then so does the child object whereas, in aggregation, the child objects may exist after the parent is destroyed. The description I've given, where references to instances of the child objects are passed in the CompositionRobot constructor implies an aggregation relationship rather than composition. However, if you were to use std::unique_ptr() when defining the parameters and creating the objects, and std::move() when they're stored in the constructor of CompositionRobot, the effect would be much the same as in Jeremy's answer where the objects (rather than a pointer or a reference to them) are defined as class members.

2
  • Follow up question: suppose Walker needs some information about CompositionRobot to implement Walker::Walk(). For instance, it needs to know CompositionRobot.position and call CompositionRobot::UpdatePosition(). Would it be idiomatic to pass a reference to CompositionRobot during construction of Walker so it has it has a member variable Walker.parent_robot?
    – segfault
    Sep 12 at 23:38
  • 1
    I've just added an update to my answer since I realised I was about to describe something more aggregation, than composition related, however.... typically, if I was implementing that sort of thing, I'd tend to create another 'interface' where position could be queried/set. The CompositionRobot would inherit from that, and the Walker class would either accept a reference to one of those in its constructor, or provide a setter function where it can be set after construction, depending on the circumstances but, ultimately, trying to avoid circular dependencies. There are other ways though! :-)
    – cosimo193
    Sep 14 at 9:21

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