66

Assume I have the type

public class A<T> { }

and somewhere in the code I want to throw an exception related to incorrect usage of that type:

throw new InvalidOperationException("Cannot use A<T> like that.");

So far, so good, but I don't want to hardcode the classes name, so I thought I could maybe use

throw new InvalidOperationException($"Cannot use {nameof(A<T>)} like that.");

instead, but in this context I don't know the exact type T. So I thought maybe I could do it with template specialization like in C++:

throw new InvalidOperationException($"Cannot use {nameof(A)} like that.");

or

throw new InvalidOperationException($"Cannot use {nameof(A<>)} like that.");

but those yield

Incorrect number of type parameters.

and

Type argument is missing.


I absolutely don't want to hardcode the classes name for it might change later. How can I get the name of the class, preferably via nameof?

Optimally, what I want to achieve is "Cannot use A<T> like that." or "Cannot use A like that.".

6
  • 1
    Just Curious. Is there a reason you don't just add a where constraint on the type of T so that you can't call the method if T is not of some Type?
    – Lithium
    Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 11:04
  • 1
    @Lithium sure, constraints would be the way to go, but this is not about the type argument, but rather it's like a warning for the developer that they shouldn't use A in that particular case at all. Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 11:05
  • 1
    nameof(type) is compiled into the assembly, so it is hardcoded, but in the assembly. Runtime it can be considered a constant.
    – Maarten
    Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 11:11
  • 2
    @Maarten you're right, but when I change A's name in the IDE, it will change all the ``nameof(type)` with it, which would not be a case for a "develop-time" constant. Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 11:12
  • 2
    @ThomasFlinkow I see, so A<T> is being passed to some method, and that method is throwing the exception because it shouldn't be passed A<T> objects? Just asking since if you want this as a warning to developers, throwing an exception only warns them when they try to run it. It seems like you could resolve this be restricting the Type of T or the types of the parameters used by methods where A<T> is being erroneously passed. Anyway design questions probably off topic to the question.
    – Lithium
    Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 11:22

4 Answers 4

54

Have you tried:

typeof(T).FullName;

or

t.GetType().FullName;

Hope it works for you.

3
  • I'm afraid that won't help, because I don't care about T, but rather about A only. Thank you anyways. Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 11:10
  • Sorry in thi case.. will becan use.. 'This': this.GetType().FullName. But glad you already get an answer
    – Pacheco
    Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 11:22
  • 1
    nameof() evaluates to a const String so it can be used in other const strings and concatenated in string literals - you can't do that with Type.FullName, unfortunately.
    – Dai
    Commented Jul 20, 2021 at 12:16
41

If you don't care about displaying T, you can just use e.g. nameof(A<object>), assuming object complies with the generic type constraints.

This results in "Cannot use A like that."

If you want to print exactly A<T>, you could use:

$"{nameof(A<T>)}<{nameof(T)}>"

But only from within the class, as T does not exist elsewhere.

7
  • 1
    thank you, this is sufficient and perfectly fine. I will accept this as soon as SO will let me. Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 11:06
  • 13
    This will give you A<T> though, not A<sometype>
    – DavidG
    Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 11:09
  • 1
    @DavidG From what I understand that is what OP is asking for: "Optimally, what I want to achieve is "Cannot use A<T> like that.""
    – Rotem
    Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 11:10
  • 3
    @quetzalcoatl: nameof only takes what the specification calls "simple names". It then devotes more than a page to specifying exactly what's simple, but bottom line, open generics aren't simple names. What it calls "unbound generic types" are only allowed in certain contexts, and are treated specially. Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 11:20
  • 1
    Hmm.. interesting. Intellisense fooled me. Before I wrote it, I checked it in VS, I wrote var foo = nameof(List<>) and it didn't get highlighted. It got highlighted only now when I tried building it. Sorry for the confusion. It's not allowed obviously. Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 11:25
12

Depending on the place you want to raise that exception, you can use the type.

On the instance, call this.GetType() and then get the Name or FullName property:

throw new InvalidOperationException($"Cannot use {this.GetType().Name} like that.");
6
  • Thank you, I didn't think of this at all. That would be a good way as well, but AFAIK it resolves the name at runtime rather than at compile time. Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 11:08
  • 3
    You can do that, but most people don't find A`1 (the real, internal name of the class) very readable. Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 11:08
  • 1
    That doesn't matter too much since type metadata is cache. Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 11:08
  • @ThomasFlinkow Well you don't know what T is until runtime.
    – DavidG
    Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 11:08
  • 1
    @JeroenMostert When derived (B : A<string>), it can be clearer than the other option. So the answer is: it depends. Commented Apr 18, 2018 at 11:09
5

typeof(A<>).Name should work.

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