3

This is a working minimal example of the problem:

import pandas as pd
example = pd.DataFrame(index=pd.np.arange(2) , columns=['A', 'B', 'C']).astype('object')
example.loc[0] = [['a'], 'b', [1,2,3]]
example.loc[1] = ['a', 'b', [1,2,3]]

I get a ValueError: setting an array element with a sequence

Here is what the DataFrame looks like in spyder: enter image description here

I do not understand why the first element has to be "nested". Why is the second row not working? What am I doing wrong? Please have a look at the second column where 'b' can directly be inserted.


I voted for the answer I personally like best of all three working solutions which were kindly provided. I find it a bit more pythonic then the other answers and additionally it is also the fastest. For a speed comparison please see this post

4 Answers 4

3

You are pushing on the boundaries of Pandas. It isn't good at handling higher level objects. So we have to be careful.

In you case, Pandas doesn't see that it is an array of objects right away and fails when it gets to the sequence.

Work Around

Wrapped in a series object

import pandas as pd
example = pd.DataFrame(index=pd.np.arange(2) , columns=['A', 'B', 'C']).astype('object')
example.loc[0] = [['a'], 'b', [1,2,3]]
example.loc[1] = pd.Series(['a', 'b', [1,2,3]], example.columns)

example

     A  B          C
0  [a]  b  [1, 2, 3]
1    a  b  [1, 2, 3]
3

Pandas isn't designed to hold collections as elements of series.

This is apparent not only in your specific task, but in other pandas functionality too. Sometimes it's a bug, sometimes an unintended consequence, other times intended.

An alternative method works if you do not set your index beforehand:

import pandas as pd

example = pd.DataFrame(columns=['A', 'B', 'C']).astype('object')

example.loc[0] = [['a'], 'b', [1,2,3]]
example.loc[1] = ['a', 'b', [1,2,3]]

print(example)

#      A  B          C
# 0  [a]  b  [1, 2, 3]
# 1    a  b  [1, 2, 3]
1

Pandas doesn't work well with non-scalar data, most of Pandas and Numpy functionalities would be out of reach. A work around to your problem is to avoid using arrays in loc and explicit cell indexing.

example.loc[1, “C”] = [1, 2, 3] #This works

for val, col in zip(['a', 'b', [1,2,3]], example.columns):
    example.loc[1, col] = val
1
  • example.loc[1: 'C'] = [1, 2, 3] #This works I assume you have small typo, so example.loc[1, 'C'] = [1, 2, 3] #This works would be right
    – TimK
    Commented Apr 20, 2018 at 12:12
0

All three answers work! But which is the fastest?

All three provided solutions from piRSquared, jpp, iDrwish work

In my questions I did not ask for a fast solution. Therefore, I just answer this additional part of the question with a timing comparison of all three options. The result of the comparison (code below) is:

Result piRSquared(): 37.966
Result jpp(): 114.580
Result iDrwish(): 154.336

The working Code for the test is:

import pandas as pd
import timeit

rows=5000

def iDrwish():
    example1 = pd.DataFrame(index = pd.np.arange(rows), columns=['A', 'B', 'C']).astype('object')
    for row in range(rows):
        for val, col in zip(['a', 'b', [1,2,3]], example1.columns):
            example1.loc[rows, col] = val


def jpp():
    example2 = pd.DataFrame(columns=['A', 'B', 'C']).astype('object')
    for row in range(rows):
        example2.loc[row] = ['a', 'b', [1,2,3]]


def piRSquared():
    example3 = pd.DataFrame(index = pd.np.arange(rows), columns=['A', 'B', 'C']).astype('object')
    for row in range(rows):
        example3.loc[row] = pd.Series(['a', 'b', [1,2,3]])        


if __name__ == '__main__':
    print('Result piRSquared(): ' + str(timeit.timeit(piRSquared, number = 11)))
    print('Result jpp(): ' + str(timeit.timeit(jpp, number = 11)))
    print('Result iDrwish(): ' + str(timeit.timeit(iDrwish, number = 11)))

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