4

I want to perform a sum reduction along arbitrary axes of a multidimensional matrix which may have arbitrary dimensions (e.g. axis 5 of a 10-dimensional array). The matrix is stored using the row-major format, i.e. as a vector together with the strides along each axis.

I know how to perform this reduction using nested loops (see example below), but doing this results in a hard-coded axis (the reduction is along axis 1 below) and an arbitrary number of dimensions (4 below). How can I generalize this without using the nested loops?


#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
  // shape, stride & data of the matrix

  size_t shape  [] = { 2, 3, 4, 5};
  size_t strides[] = {60,20, 5, 1};

  std::vector<double> data(2*3*4*5);

  for ( size_t i = 0 ; i < data.size() ; ++i ) data[i] = 1.;

  // shape, stride & data (zero-initialized) of the reduced matrix

  size_t rshape  [] = { 2, 4, 5};
  size_t rstrides[] = {20, 5, 1};

  std::vector<double> rdata(2*4*5, 0.0);

  // compute reduction

  for ( size_t a = 0 ; a < shape[0] ; ++a )
    for ( size_t c = 0 ; c < shape[2] ; ++c )
      for ( size_t d = 0 ; d < shape[3] ; ++d )
        for ( size_t b = 0 ; b < shape[1] ; ++b )
          rdata[ a*rstrides[0]                 + c*rstrides[1] + d*rstrides[2] ] += \
          data [ a*strides [0] + b*strides [1] + c*strides [2] + d*strides [3] ];

  // print resulting reduced matrix

  for ( size_t a = 0 ; a < rshape[0] ; ++a )
    for ( size_t b = 0 ; b < rshape[1] ; ++b )
      for ( size_t c = 0 ; c < rshape[2] ; ++c )
        std::cout << "(" << a << "," << b << "," << c << ") " << \
        rdata[ a*rstrides[0] + b*rstrides[1] + c*rstrides[2] ] << std::endl;

  return 0;
}

Note: I want to avoid 'decompressing' and 'compressing' a counter. By this I mean that I could, in pseudo-code, do:

for ( size_t i = 0 ; i < data.size() ; ++i ) 
{
  i -> {a,b,c,d}

  discard "b" (axis 1) -> {a,c,d}

  rdata(a,c,d) += data(a,b,c,d)
}
  • What does (de)compressing a counter look like? – Useless Apr 18 '18 at 14:19
  • @Useless I've added a pseudo-code of what I mean with (de)compressing a counter. – Tom de Geus Apr 18 '18 at 14:24
  • @TomdeGeus Why is stride value 60 being dropped and not 20? Is that a typo or am I misunderstanding the algorithm? – Darhuuk Apr 18 '18 at 15:20
  • 1
    Oh, so you don't want to do a linear scan of the source converting the flat index into n-dimensional coordinates, right? But isn't that likely to be most efficient? – Useless Apr 18 '18 at 15:30
  • @Darhuuk rstrides contains the strides of the reduced array. As its shape is {2,4,5} its stride should be {rshape[1]*rshape[0], rshape[0], 1} == {20, 5, 1}. I've added comments to emphasize this point. – Tom de Geus Apr 18 '18 at 15:33
3

I don't know how efficient this code is, but in my opinion, it is sure to be precise.

What's going on?

A little on adjusted_strides:

For axis_count = 4, adjusted_strides has size 5, where:

 adjusted_strides[0] = shape[0]*shape[1]*shape[2]*shape[3];
 adjusted_strides[1] = shape[1]*shape[2]*shape[3];
 adjusted_strides[2] = shape[2]*shape[3];
 adjusted_strides[3] = shape[3];
 adjusted_strides[4] = 1;

Let's take the example where the number of dimensions is 4 and the shape of the multidimensional array (A) is n0, n1, n2, n3.

When we need to transform this array into another multidimensional array (B) of shape: n0, n2, n3 (compressing axis = 1 (0-based)), then, we try to proceed as follows:

For each index of A we try to find its position in B. Let A[i][j][k][l] be any element in A. Its position in flat_A will be A[i*n1*n2*n3 + j*n2*n3 + k*n3 + l]

idx = i*n1*n2*n3 + j*n2*n3 + k*n3 + l;

In the compressed array B, this element will be a part of (or added to), B[i][k][l]. In flat_B the index is new_idx = i*n2*n3 + k*n3 + l;.

How do we form new_idx from idx?

  1. All the axes before the compressed axis have the shape of the compressed axis as a part of their product. In our example we had to remove axis 1, so all the axes which were before the 1st axis (only one here: the 0th axis) represented by i), have n1 as a part of product (i*n1*n2*n3).

  2. All the axes after the compressed axis remain unaffected.

  3. Finally, we need to do two things:

    1. Isolate the indices of the axes before the index of the axis to be compressed and remove the shape of this axis:

      Integer division: idx / (n1*n2*n3); (== idx / adjusted_strides[1]).

      We are left with just i, which can be readjusted according to the new shape (by multiplying with n2*n3): we get

      i*n2*n3 (== i * adjusted_strides[2]).

    2. We isolate the axes after the compressed axis, which are unaffected by its shape.

      idx % (n2*n3) (== idx % adjusted_strides[2])

      which gives us k*n3 + l.

    3. Adding the results of step i. and ii. results in:

      computed_idx = i*n2*n3 + k*n3 + l;

      Which is the same as new_idx. So, our transformation was correct :).

Code:

Note: ni refers to new_idx.

  size_t cmp_axis = 1, axis_count = sizeof shape/ sizeof *shape;
  std::vector<size_t> adjusted_strides;
  //adjusted strides is basically same as strides
  //only difference being that the first element is the 
  //total number of elements in the n dim array.

  //The only reason to introduce this array was
  //so that I don't have to write any if-elses
  adjusted_strides.push_back(shape[0]*strides[0]);
  adjusted_strides.insert(adjusted_strides.end(), strides, strides + axis_count);
  for(size_t i = 0; i < data.size(); ++i) {
    size_t ni = i/adjusted_strides[cmp_axis]*adjusted_strides[cmp_axis+1] + i%adjusted_strides[cmp_axis+1];
    rdata[ni] += data[i];
  }

Output (axis = 1)

(0,0,0) 3
(0,0,1) 3
(0,0,2) 3
(0,0,3) 3
(0,0,4) 3
(0,1,0) 3
(0,1,1) 3
(0,1,2) 3
(0,1,3) 3
(0,1,4) 3
(0,2,0) 3
(0,2,1) 3
(0,2,2) 3
(0,2,3) 3
(0,2,4) 3
(0,3,0) 3
(0,3,1) 3
(0,3,2) 3
...

Tested here.

For further reading, refer to this.

  • That's very clever, exactly where I'm looking for. I think I understand what is being done, but for future reference I do think that the post would benefit from an explanation of ni. – Tom de Geus Apr 18 '18 at 18:18
  • @TomdeGeus added explanation. :) – vishal-wadhwa Apr 18 '18 at 19:35
1

I think this should work:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
  // shape, stride & data of the matrix
  size_t shape  [] = {  2, 3, 4, 5};
  size_t strides[] = {60, 20, 5, 1};
  std::vector<double> data(2 * 3 * 4 * 5);

  size_t rshape  [] = { 2, 4, 5};
  size_t rstrides[] = {3, 5, 1};
  std::vector<double> rdata(2 * 4 * 5, 0.0);

  const unsigned int NDIM = 4;
  unsigned int axis = 1;

  for (size_t i = 0 ; i < data.size() ; ++i) data[i] = 1;

  // How many elements to advance after each reduction
  size_t step_axis = strides[NDIM - 1];
  if (axis == NDIM - 1)
  {
      step_axis = strides[NDIM - 2];
  }
  // Position of the first element of the current reduction
  size_t offset_base = 0;
  size_t offset = 0;
  size_t s = 0;
  for (auto &v : rdata)
  {
      // Current reduced element
      size_t offset_i = offset;
      for (unsigned int i = 0; i < shape[axis]; i++)
      {
          // Reduce
          v += *(data.data() + offset_i);
          // Advance to next element
          offset_i += strides[axis];
      }
      s = (s + 1) % strides[axis];
      if (s == 0)
      {
          offset_base += strides[axis - 1];
          offset = offset_base;
      }
      else
      {
          offset += step_axis;
      }
  }

  // Print
  for ( size_t a = 0 ; a < rshape[0] ; ++a )
    for ( size_t b = 0 ; b < rshape[1] ; ++b )
      for ( size_t c = 0 ; c < rshape[2] ; ++c )
        std::cout << "(" << a << "," << b << "," << c << ") " << \
        rdata[ a*rstrides[0] + b*rstrides[1] + c*rstrides[2] ] << std::endl;

  return 0;
}

Output:

(0,0,0) 3
(0,0,1) 3
(0,0,2) 3
(0,0,3) 3
(0,0,4) 3
(0,1,0) 3
(0,1,1) 3
(0,1,2) 3
(0,1,3) 3
(0,1,4) 3
(0,2,0) 3
(0,2,1) 3
(0,2,2) 3
// ...

Setting axis = 3 yields:

(0,0,0) 5
(0,0,1) 5
(0,0,2) 5
(0,0,3) 5
(0,0,4) 5
(0,1,0) 5
(0,1,1) 5
(0,1,2) 5
(0,1,3) 5
(0,1,4) 5
(0,2,0) 5
(0,2,1) 5
(0,2,2) 5
(0,2,3) 5
// ...
  • I found a way how to break it ;) (see example). However, I don't understand why it is broken.... – Tom de Geus Apr 18 '18 at 18:38
  • @TomdeGeus Interestingly, there was a minor error from your side (using MAX_DIM instead of m_ndim) and a more significant one from mine (correctly offset computation). I fixed the answer, and the fixed code is here. In any case, even though the complexity is equivalent (iterating once through the first whole tensor), the other answer should be significantly better, cache-wise. – jdehesa Apr 19 '18 at 10:10
  • Thanks for the fix! In fact, I expected that in my off-site implementation MAX_DIM and m_ndim are equivalent, as I fill the strides until MAX_DIM. But this is not so important I guess. Indeed I go with the other implementation, but thanks a lot! – Tom de Geus Apr 19 '18 at 12:33

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