I'm constantly running into the problem of having an abstract class that does all the heavy lifting and then I have a lot of polymorphic classes that customize the abstract to a specific need. The abstract generally needs a lot of parameters, so they all have to be passed from all polymorphic classes

public class FooComplex : AbstractFoo {
    public FooComplex(IBarAwesome awesome, IBarCool cool, ...) : base(IBarAwesome awesome, IBarCool cool, ...) { }
    ...a lot of overriding abstracts
}

public class FooSimple : AbstractFoo
{
    public FooSimple(IBarAwesome awesome, IBarCool cool, ...) : base(IBarAwesome awesome, IBarCool cool, ...) { }
    ...little bit of overriding abstracts
}

public class AbstractFoo
{
    public AbstractFoo(IBarAwesome awesome, IBarCool cool, ...)
    ...heavy lifting
}

Is there anything I can do to not pass all these things, but be able to unit test them? I've always been taught that doing

var awesome = container.Resolve<IBarAwesome>();

In like say the constructor is bad practice.

The reason I would like to find a solution to this, is it makes it harder and hard to pass anything new into the abstract class as I have to copy and pass the same parameters into many polymorphic subclasses.

  • 1
    If you expect these parameters to change over time, one solution is to put them in an AbstractFooParameters class, that the concrete classes pass as a single parameter. Not sure if that's what you were looking for though. – C.Evenhuis Apr 18 at 18:07
  • would that be able to be used with a DI? – Ian Overton Apr 18 at 18:11
  • I don't know autofac but it should work with constructor injection, just like with any other constructor parameter. – C.Evenhuis Apr 18 at 18:22
  • I actually like this solution can you post it as an answer? – Ian Overton Apr 18 at 18:50
  • @IanOverton, I agree that C.Evenhuis solution was my initial thought on how to solve this issue, however the implementation depends very much on the context of these parameters, and what you're trying to achieve – mrdnk Apr 18 at 19:45

I believe this is similar to what @C.Evenhuis mentioned in the comments by abstracting your constructor parameters into a common interface so they can be passed as single constructor parameter as well as being easily tested.

Concrete Classes:

public class FooComplex : AbstractFoo
{
    public FooComplex(ComplexParam complexParam) : base(complexParam)
    {}
}

public class FooSimple : AbstractFoo
{
    public FooSimple(SimpleParam simpleParam) : base(simpleParam)
    {}
}

Single Generic Concrete Class (Optional)

With this class, you could pass any type into the constructor which inherits IParams and potentially remove the need for FooComplex and FooSimple.

public class Foo<T> : AbstractFoo where T : IParam
{
    public Foo(T param) : base(param)
    { }
}

Base Abstract Class:

public abstract class AbstractFoo
{
 protected AbstractFoo(IParam parameter) { }
}

Interfaces:

public interface IBarCool : IBar
{}

public interface IBarAwesome : IBar
{}

public interface IBar
{}

public interface IParam
{
    IEnumerable<IBar> Param { get; }
}

Reusable Concrete Parameters:

I personally don't like this method below because of the repetition but I suppose if each of the classes have their own separate implementation then it's okay. Another option would be to just have a class called ParameterHolder and two instances of the class named appropriately e.g. var complex = new ParameterHolder() and pass to the Generic Foo<T>.

public class ComplexParam : IParam
{
    public IEnumerable<IBar> Param { get; }

    public ComplexParam(IEnumerable<IBar> complexParam)
    {
        Param = complexParam;
    }
}

public class SimpleParam : IParam
{
    public IEnumerable<IBar> Param { get; }

    public SimpleParam(IEnumerable<IBar> simpleParam)
    {
        Param = simpleParam;
    }
}
  • 2
    From a "solving this with Autofac" perspective, Autofac supports the "aggregate service" pattern, allowing you to define an interface where the required parameters are properties on the interface. Autofac will dynamically generate the concrete implementation of the interface and populate the properties for you. See the docs for an example. – Travis Illig Apr 19 at 15:17
  • @TravisIllig Not had the pleasure of using Autofac. Just going through the doc's now...pretty impressive. – Kitson88 Apr 19 at 15:31
  • the param list is the same in both classes not a dynamic list. it's jus tthe details the class are different. What Travis said is interesting I'll have to try that. It will make it so I don't need to have a concrete class to accomplish what I'm wanting to do. – Ian Overton Apr 19 at 16:10
  • +1 Even though I didn't need this kind of solution for this problem its definitely an awesome one and I'll have to find places to use it. – Ian Overton Apr 20 at 18:04
up vote 0 down vote accepted

All that needs to happen is:

public interface IAbstractParams
{
   IBarAwesome awesome { get; } 
   IBarCool cool { get; }
   ... 
}

public class FooComplex : AbstractFoo 
{
    public FooComplex(IAbstractParams params) : base(params) { }
    ...a lot of overriding abstracts
}

public class FooSimple : AbstractFoo
{
    public FooSimple(IAbstractParams params) : base(params) { }
    ...little bit of overriding abstracts
}

public class AbstractFoo
{
    protected readonly IBarAwesome _awesome;
    protected readonly IBarCool _cool;

    public AbstractFoo(IAbstractParams params)
    {
     _awesome = params.awesome;
     _cool = params.cool;
    }

    ...heavy lifting
}

then you need to add the nuget package Autofac.Extras.AggregateService and add this line to your builder:

builder.RegisterAggregateService<IAbstractParams>();

Thank you to @Travis Illig and @C.Evenhuis for helping me come up with this solution.

For more complex solutions to this same problem please look at @Kitson88

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