44

I think the title says it all. The yellow warning is displayed every time I unmount a component that is still fetching.

Warning: Can't call setState (or forceUpdate) on an unmounted component. This is a no-op, but ... To fix, cancel all subscriptions and asynchronous tasks in the componentWillUnmount method.

  constructor(props){
    super(props);
    this.state = {
      isLoading: true,
      dataSource: [{
        name: 'loading...',
        id: 'loading',
      }]
    }
  }

  componentDidMount(){
    return fetch('LINK HERE')
      .then((response) => response.json())
      .then((responseJson) => {
        this.setState({
          isLoading: false,
          dataSource: responseJson,
        }, function(){
        });
      })
      .catch((error) =>{
        console.error(error);
      });
  }
31

When you fire a Promise it might take a few seconds before it resolves and by that time user might have navigated to another place in your app. So when Promise resolves setState is executed on unmounted component and you get an error - just like in your case. This may also cause memory leaks.

That's why it is best to move some of your asynchronous logic out of components.

Otherwise, you will need to somehow cancel your Promise. Alternatively - as a last resort technique (it's an antipattern) - you can keep a variable to check whether the component is still mounted:

componentDidMount(){
  this.mounted = true;

  this.props.fetchData().then((response) => {
    if(this.mounted) {
      this.setState({ data: response })
    }
  })
}

componentWillUnmount(){
  this.mounted = false;
}

I will stress that again - this is an antipattern but may be sufficient in your case (just like they did with Formik implementation).

A similar discussion on GitHub

EDIT:

This is probably how would I solve the same problem (having nothing but React) with Hooks:

OPTION A:

import React, { useState, useEffect } from "react";

export default function Page() {
  const value = usePromise("https://something.com/api/");
  return (
    <p>{value ? value : "fetching data..."}</p>
  );
}

let isMounted; // track whether component is mounted
function usePromise(url) {
  const [value, setState] = useState(null);

  useEffect(() => {
    isMounted = true;

    request.get(url)
      .then(result => {
        if (isMounted) {
          setState(result);
        }
      });

    return () => {
      // clean up
      isMounted = false;
    };
  }, []); // only on "didMount"

  return value;
}

OPTION B: Alternatively with useRef which behaves like a static property of a class because it doesn't make component rerender when it's value changes:

function usePromise2(url) {
  const isMounted = React.useRef(true)
  const [value, setState] = useState(null);


  useEffect(() => {
    isMounted.current = true;

    request.get(url)
      .then(result => {
        if (isMounted.current) {
          setState(result);
        }
      });

    return () => {
      // clean up
      isMounted.current = false;
    };
  }, []); // only on "didMount"

  return value;
}

Example: https://codesandbox.io/s/86n1wq2z8

  • so there's no real way to just cancel the fetch on the componentWillUnmount ? – João Belo Apr 18 '18 at 18:32
  • @JoãoBelo I'm not sure if it's supported. Take a look at this package – Tomasz Mularczyk Apr 18 '18 at 18:36
  • 1
    Oh, I didn't notice the code of your answer before, it did work. thanks – João Belo Apr 18 '18 at 19:09
  • 5
    see isMounted is an Antipattern and aborting a fetch. – mb21 May 17 '18 at 9:30
  • It's now necessary to name the "isMounted" variable differently, otherwise you'll get an error setting getter-only property – dude Jun 26 '18 at 15:34
13

The friendly people at React recommend wrapping your fetch calls/promises in a cancelable promise. While there is no recommendation in that documentation to keep the code separate from the class or function with the fetch, this seems advisable because other classes and functions are likely to need this functionality, code duplication is an anti-pattern, and regardless the lingering code should be disposed of or canceled in componentWillUnmount(). As per React, you can call cancel() on the wrapped promise in componentWillUnmount to avoid setting state on an unmounted component.

The provided code would look something like these code snippets if we use React as a guide:

const makeCancelable = (promise) => {
    let hasCanceled_ = false;

    const wrappedPromise = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        promise.then(
            val => hasCanceled_ ? reject({isCanceled: true}) : resolve(val),
            error => hasCanceled_ ? reject({isCanceled: true}) : reject(error)
        );
    });

    return {
        promise: wrappedPromise,
        cancel() {
            hasCanceled_ = true;
        },
    };
};

const cancelablePromise = makeCancelable(fetch('LINK HERE'));

constructor(props){
    super(props);
    this.state = {
        isLoading: true,
        dataSource: [{
            name: 'loading...',
            id: 'loading',
        }]
    }
}

componentDidMount(){
    cancelablePromise.
        .then((response) => response.json())
        .then((responseJson) => {
            this.setState({
                isLoading: false,
                dataSource: responseJson,
            }, () => {

            });
        })
        .catch((error) =>{
            console.error(error);
        });
}

componentWillUnmount() {
    cancelablePromise.cancel();
}

---- EDIT ----

I have found the given answer may not be quite correct by following the issue on GitHub. Here is one version that I use which works for my purposes:

export const makeCancelableFunction = (fn) => {
    let hasCanceled = false;

    return {
        promise: (val) => new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
            if (hasCanceled) {
                fn = null;
            } else {
                fn(val);
                resolve(val);
            }
        }),
        cancel() {
            hasCanceled = true;
        }
    };
};

The idea was to help the garbage collector free up memory by making the function or whatever you use null.

  • do you have the link to the issue on github – Ren Nov 1 '18 at 3:27
  • @Ren, there is a GitHub site for editing the page and discussing issues. – haleonj Nov 2 '18 at 12:12
  • I'm no longer sure where the exact issue is on that GitHub project. – haleonj Nov 2 '18 at 12:13
  • 1
    Link to the GitHub issue: github.com/facebook/react/issues/5465 – sammalfix Dec 7 '18 at 8:56
7

You can use AbortController to cancel a fetch request.

class FetchComponent extends React.Component{
  state = { todos: [] };
  
  controller = new AbortController();
  
  componentDidMount(){
    fetch('https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/todos',{
      signal: this.controller.signal
    })
    .then(res => res.json())
    .then(todos => this.setState({ todos }))
    .catch(e => alert(e.message));
  }
  
  componentWillUnmount(){
    this.controller.abort();
  }
  
  render(){
    return null;
  }
}

class App extends React.Component{
  state = { fetch: true };
  
  componentDidMount(){
    this.setState({ fetch: false });
  }
  
  render(){
    return this.state.fetch && <FetchComponent/>
  }
}

ReactDOM.render(<App/>, document.getElementById('root'))
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react-dom.min.js"></script>
<div id="root"></div>

3

The crux of this warning is that your component has a reference to it that is held by some outstanding callback/promise.

To avoid the antipattern of keeping your isMounted state around (which keeps your component alive) as was done in the second pattern, the react website suggests using an optional promise; however that code also appears to keep your object alive.

Instead, I've done it by using a closure with a nested bound function to setState.

Here's my constructor(typescript)…

constructor(props: any, context?: any) {
    super(props, context);

    let cancellable = {
        // it's important that this is one level down, so we can drop the
        // reference to the entire object by setting it to undefined.
        setState: this.setState.bind(this)
    };

    this.componentDidMount = async () => {
        let result = await fetch(…);            
        // ideally we'd like optional chaining
        // cancellable.setState?.({ url: result || '' });
        cancellable.setState && cancellable.setState({ url: result || '' });
    }

    this.componentWillUnmount = () => {
        cancellable.setState = undefined; // drop all references.
    }
}
  • 2
    This is conceptually no different than keeping an isMounted flag, only you're binding it to the closure instead of hanging it of this – AnilRedshift Oct 19 '18 at 18:48
3

Since the post had been opened, an "abortable-fetch" has been added. https://developers.google.com/web/updates/2017/09/abortable-fetch

(from the docs:)

The controller + signal manoeuvre Meet the AbortController and AbortSignal:

const controller = new AbortController();
const signal = controller.signal;

The controller only has one method:

controller.abort(); When you do this, it notifies the signal:

signal.addEventListener('abort', () => {
  // Logs true:
  console.log(signal.aborted);
});

This API is provided by the DOM standard, and that's the entire API. It's deliberately generic so it can be used by other web standards and JavaScript libraries.

for example, here's how you'd make a fetch timeout after 5 seconds:

const controller = new AbortController();
const signal = controller.signal;

setTimeout(() => controller.abort(), 5000);

fetch(url, { signal }).then(response => {
  return response.text();
}).then(text => {
  console.log(text);
});
2

When I need to "cancel all subscriptions and asynchronous" I usually dispatch something to redux in componentWillUnmount to inform all other subscribers and send one more request about cancellation to server if necessary

0

I think I figured a way around it. The problem is not as much the fetching itself but the setState after the component is dismissed. So the solution was to set this.state.isMounted as false and then on componentWillMount change it to true, and in componentWillUnmount set to false again. Then just if(this.state.isMounted) the setState inside the fetch. Like so:

  constructor(props){
    super(props);
    this.state = {
      isMounted: false,
      isLoading: true,
      dataSource: [{
        name: 'loading...',
        id: 'loading',
      }]
    }
  }

  componentDidMount(){
    this.setState({
      isMounted: true,
    })

    return fetch('LINK HERE')
      .then((response) => response.json())
      .then((responseJson) => {
        if(this.state.isMounted){
          this.setState({
            isLoading: false,
            dataSource: responseJson,
          }, function(){
          });
        }
      })
      .catch((error) =>{
        console.error(error);
      });
  }

  componentWillUnmount() {
    this.setState({
      isMounted: false,
    })
  }
  • 1
    setState is probably not ideal, since it won't update the value in state immediately. – LeonF May 11 '18 at 16:25

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