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Im learning react and very new to this, I am tinkering with something to understand this more.

I would like to know if it is possible to console.log the state of the CHILD using a prop passed down by the parent.

Example :

Child component ( has its own state)
Parentcomponent ( has its own state)

Child Component
this.state={ animal:'Lion' }

<button onClick{this.props.giveMeState}>

And that, I would want to console the state ( animal:Lion)

Parent Component

this.state={ name: 'John' }
giveMeState(){ ? what can go here, or is it not that simple ? ) }

Codepen of example

  • Sorry, it is not very clear to me. Do you want to use same function for both components? And you want to get it from parent as props for children? I think console.log is just an example here since you can use simply console.log( this.state ) where you need. – devserkan Apr 18 '18 at 21:14
  • My mistake I tried to do psuedo code to make it easier to understand. There is one function in the Parent, it is passed down as a prop to the Child. And then I want to see if its possible to access the state of the Child using that prop. – born2gamble Apr 18 '18 at 22:12
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Parent component cannot query the state of the child component. At least, that's not the intended design of React.

What I think you're asking is how to coordinate the state of child with parent, and you're on the right track to use a prop to pass the state from child to parent.

Perhaps a complete example that does what you want would look like this:

class Parent extends React.Component {
  state = { name: "John" }
  handleChildAnimal = animal => 
    this.setState({ animal });
  handleClick = e => 
    console.log(`Child animal: ${this.state.animal}`);
  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <Child onAnimal={this.handleChildAnimal} />
        <button onClick={this.handleClick}>Tell me Animal state</button>
      </div>
    );
  }
}

class Child extends React.Component {
  state = { animal: "Lion" }
  handleClick = e => {
    console.log(`Animal: ${this.state.animal}`);
    this.props.onAnimal(this.state.animal);
  }
  render() {
    return (
      <button onClick={this.handleClick}>{this.state.animal}</button>
    );
  }
}

Demo on CodePen.io

  • I have included the codepen in the OP....it may be a dumb question, or not possible. Thanks for your example of coordinating the state. I'm digesting the info ! – born2gamble Apr 18 '18 at 23:17
  • Question was answered by Avinash. l was thinking about it completely bad as I dont see why I would use that now. Thank you as your answer has opened my eyes into how components interact alot better. – born2gamble Apr 19 '18 at 0:19
  • As you see more example, you will understand that actually how simple it is. I'm saying this as a learner :) Usually we pass functions to child components and get back information using that function. You can accept @Aaron's answer. There is just one thing, if you click "Tell me animal state" without clicking "Lion" you get undefined state since there is no state at first. I will add another answer for the sake of noobs like me :) – devserkan Apr 19 '18 at 13:36
  • I was staring/playing with the code for a looooong time. I think its the combo of arrow function/ prop passing that is making my head aspode. I can make sense of it now, but its like going down a rabbit hole. – born2gamble Apr 20 '18 at 18:37
  • 1
    @born2gamble, probably you are going through the same road like I did because what you said here exactly how I felt some time ago. After saw more and more examples and followed the tutorials I feel a little bit comfortable with the code right now. I suggest studying a little bit ES6 and maybe ES7 before going through React since you will see lots of things related with it (especially ES6). – devserkan Apr 20 '18 at 18:49
1

if you want to pass the state value of the child to the parent, you can do it like this,

In the child component add another function getState and call the reference function giveMeState through this function

...
constructor(props) {
super(props)
this.state={ animal:'Lion' }
this.getState = this.getState.bind(this)

}
getState(){
this.props.giveMeState(this.state)
}
....
   <button onClick={this.getState}>
....

and also redefine the parent function so that it takes a parameter and the console.log that parameter

Not sure if this is a good pattern though

  • Yes it seems pretty bad, but it does answer my question. – born2gamble Apr 19 '18 at 0:14
1

Here is another answer just for giving another example.

It does not fulfill your question and as told fulfilling your question would not be the best approach. Maybe you should try to think differently while working React and states.

App

class App extends React.Component {
  state = {
    input: "initial input state",
    childState: "right now I don't know child state",
  };

  handleInputChange = e => this.setState({ input: e.target.value });
  handleChildState = ( childState ) => this.setState( { childState } ) 

  render() {
    return (
      <div style={styles}>
        <h4>This is parent component.</h4>
        <p>Input state is: {this.state.input} </p>
        <p>Child state is: {this.state.childState}</p>
        <hr />
        <Input
          onInputChange={this.handleInputChange}
          getState={this.handleChildState}
        />
      </div>
    );
  }
}

Child component as Input

class Input extends React.Component {
  state = {
    myState: "some state"
  };

  handleSendState = () => this.props.getState(this.state.myState);
  handleState = e => this.setState({ myState: e.target.value });

  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <h4>This is Child coponent</h4>
        <button onClick={this.handleSendState}>
          Click me to get child state
        </button>
        <p>This is my state: {this.state.myState}</p>
        <p>Write something to change child's state.</p>
        <input type="text" onChange={this.handleState} />
        <p>
          Write something to change parent's input state
        </p>
        <input type="text" onChange={this.props.onInputChange} />
      </div>
    );
  }
}

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