In EF6 I was able to check whether the database needed upgrading and get an OK from the (power) user

I made use of

dbContext.Database.CompatibleWithModel and db.RunMigrations()

I can't find these methods in EF7. Can I still do this in EF7?

So far I have the following

namespace Console4Migration
{
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        var builder = new ConfigurationBuilder();
        builder.AddJsonFile("appsettings.json");

        var config = builder.Build();
        var connectionString = config.GetConnectionString("ApplicationDatabase");

        var optionsBuilder = new DbContextOptionsBuilder<ApiDbContext>();
        optionsBuilder.UseSqlServer(connectionString);
        var options = new DbContextOptions<ApiDbContext>();

        var db = new ApiDbContext(options);

        var numUsers = db.Users.Count();

        Console.WriteLine("finished opening the database");
    }
  }
}

and

    public class ApiDbContext : IdentityDbContext<ApplicationUser>
{

    public ApiDbContext(DbContextOptions<ApiDbContext> options)
        : base(options)
    {


    }

}

 public class ApplicationUser : IdentityUser
{
}
  • I put an answer below that allows me to detect and run migrations. However it does not catch the fact that the database is not compatible which is what I really want. – Kirsten Greed Apr 19 at 20:53

I was able to create a partial solution as shown here that detects the need to run migrations and optionally runs them.

However it does not check for whether the model is compatible which I would still like to do.

using System;
using System.Text;
using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore;
using Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration;
using MyApi.Entities;

namespace Console4Migration
{
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var builder = new ConfigurationBuilder();
        builder.AddJsonFile("appsettings.json");

        var config = builder.Build();
        var connectionString = config.GetConnectionString("MyDatabase");

        var optionsBuilder = new DbContextOptionsBuilder<ApiDbContext>();
        optionsBuilder.UseSqlServer(connectionString);

        var options = optionsBuilder.Options;

        var db = new ApiDbContext(options);

       if (EFFunctions.HasOutstandingMigrations(db))
        {
            var sb = new StringBuilder();
            sb.AppendLine("Upgrades are needed. Enter Y to upgrade");
            sb.AppendLine(EFFunctions.GetUpgradesDescription(db));
            Console.WriteLine(sb);
            var answer = Console.ReadKey();
            if (answer.Key != ConsoleKey.Y)
            {


                Console.WriteLine("No upgrade performed");
                Console.ReadKey();
                return;
            }
            db.Database.Migrate();
            Console.WriteLine("Migration performed");
            Console.ReadKey();
            return;
        }

        Console.WriteLine("There are no migrations outstanding");
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}
}

and

using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore;

public static class EFFunctions
{
public static string GetUpgradesDescription(DbContext db)
{
    var migrations = db.Database.GetPendingMigrations();
    var sb = new StringBuilder();
    var enumerable = migrations as string[] ?? migrations.ToArray();
    if (!enumerable.Any()) return sb.ToString();
    foreach (var migration in enumerable)
    {
        sb.AppendLine(migration);
    }

    return sb.ToString();
}

public static bool HasOutstandingMigrations(DbContext db)
{
    return GetUpgradesDescription(db).Length == 0;
}
}
  • 1
    If this is your answer, Could you please provide some explanation? – vivek nuna Apr 19 at 10:49
  • 1
    What is the model is incompatible and you don't have migrations scaffolded. – Smit Apr 19 at 17:40
  • Thanks @viveknuna I updated the question to include an explanation – Kirsten Greed Apr 19 at 20:42
  • 1
    It is not same as CompatibleWithModel. If your current model differs from Database model but no migration is pending then your code would say it is fine but it will fail at runtime if mismatch. – Smit Apr 19 at 21:48
  • 1
    Runtime failure would be for application and not this code. Suppose you renamed a property in your code model. While running the query, EF Core would try to find the column which match the property name. But since such column does not exist, it is will fail while running SQL. The above code is good check for pending migrations. It wouldn't do deep match for compatibility. – Smit Apr 20 at 19:27

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