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I was trying to free memory for a linked list iteratively. The list has a struct which looks like this, and in this linked list, I don't add a url if it's in this list.

struct Node {
    char *url;
    struct Node *next;
};

Once done working with this linked list, I tried to free it, but got segmentation fault, I'm still in the way of learning c, I haven't got much clue of how to debugging such error other than directly searching for related topics. Referenced a few SOs this one, this one and this one, still cannot figure out where it got crashed.

Here's my code. Free feel to add comments if you think anything I missed in this implementation.

void url_push(struct Node *head, const char *url, size_t url_size) {
    struct Node *new_node = (struct Node *) malloc(sizeof(struct Node));

    new_node->url = malloc(url_size);
    new_node->next = NULL;

    for (int i = 0; i < url_size; i++)
        *(new_node->url + i) = *(url + i);

    struct Node *current = head;
    while(1) {
        if (strcmp(current->url, new_node->url) == 0) {
            printf("Seen page %s!!!!!\n", new_node->url);
            free(new_node);
            break;
        } else if (current->next == NULL) {

            current->next = new_node;
            break;
        } else {
            current = current->next;
        }
    }
}

int main() {
    struct Node *head = (struct Node*)malloc(sizeof(struct Node));
    head->url = "/";
    head->next = NULL;

    char *url = "www.google.com";
    url_push(head, url, strlen(url));

    url = "www.yahoo.com";
    url_push(head, url, strlen(url));

    url = "www.google.com";
    url_push(head, url, strlen(url));

    url = "www.wsj.com";
    url_push(head, url, strlen(url));

    struct Node *current = NULL;

    while ((current = head) != NULL) {
        printf("url: %s\n", head->url);

        head = head->next;
        free(current->url);
        free(current);
    }
}

Edited: To reduce the confusions, I revised the struct. The purpose of using strcmp is to avoid adding a url that already seen.

  • You need a remove() method which implements the logic to remove a single node in the list. This must take care to reconnect the previous node to the next node in the list. – Code-Apprentice Apr 18 '18 at 22:59
  • There is too much wrong to answer your question. How are the invalid, redirect, and page_size variables set? What is current pointer for if you never move it? Head should never be moved since it is the start of the list. Why are you even freeing the list when you can just end the program? – Engineer Apr 18 '18 at 23:06
  • Please provide A Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable Example (MCVE). – David C. Rankin Apr 18 '18 at 23:17
  • You edited the struct, but now your code doesn't compile. If you provide code that isn't identical to what you're working with (which you usually should), make sure it reproduces the same problem. – Daniel H Apr 18 '18 at 23:32
  • here, take a look to a good implementation exemple ;) like linus say "don't talk show me the code" – Stargateur Apr 18 '18 at 23:37
1

There are multiple problems in your code:

  • you do not allocate space for the null terminator for the new_node->url strings in url_push, causing strcmp() too have undefined behavior.
  • the first node is not properly constructed: its url pointer is not allocated.
  • you so not check for memory allocation failure

You should make url_push() more generic: it should handle empty lists by returning the new head pointer. You do not need to pass the length of the url string, just use strdup(), and you should avoid allocating a new node before checking for duplicates.

Here is a modified version:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

struct Node {
    char *url;
    struct Node *next;
};

struct Node *url_push(struct Node *head, const char *url) {

    struct Node *current = head;
    if (current != NULL) {
        for (;;) {
            if (strcmp(current->url, url) == 0) {
                printf("Seen page %s before!!!!!\n", url);
                return head;
            } else if (current->next == NULL) {
                break;
            } else {
                current = current->next;
            }
        }
    }
    struct Node *new_node = malloc(sizeof(struct Node));

    if (new_node == NULL || (new_node->url = strdup(url)) == NULL) {
        fprintf(stderr, "memory allocation failure\n");
        exit(1);
    }
    new_node->next = NULL;

    if (current == NULL) {
        head = new_node;
    } else {
        current->next = new_node;
    }
    return head;
}

int main() {
    struct Node *head = NULL;

    head = url_push(head, "/");
    head = url_push(head, "www.google.com");
    head = url_push(head, "www.yahoo.com");
    head = url_push(head, "www.google.com");
    head = url_push(head, "www.wsj.com");

    while (head != NULL) {
        printf("url: %s\n", head->url);
        struct Node *current = head;
        head = head->next;
        free(current->url);
        free(current);
    }
    return 0;
}
  • I was just wondering does char *url = "www.google.com" has a terminating 0? If it has one, why cannot we use strcpy? If it doesn't have one, should we also add the 0 to url? – GabrielChu Apr 19 '18 at 0:18
  • @GabrielChu: string literals of course have a null terminator. You can use strcpy if you allocate the proper size: strlen(url) + 1, but you can use the Posix normalized function strdup() that does both the allocation and the copy. – chqrlie Apr 19 '18 at 0:18
2

head->url = "/";

That is not malloced data so you can't free it!

Your other problem is in url_push() with new_node->url = malloc(url_size); which does not allocate enough space for the terminating 0 in the string (nor does it copy the terminating 0 so you end up not "stomping on memory" but do have unterminated strings...). Try new_node->url = strdup(url); instead.

Style wise: calculate url_size in url_push() instead of making each caller call strlen() do it once inside the function being called (note if you use strdup() then you don't need the url_size at all.

Final note: A tool like valgrind would find both of these problems easily.

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