37

I am new to Next.js and I am struggling with the authentication system using jwt token. I want to know what is the best / standard way to store the jwt token and routing with the authentication system. I have been trying different approaches, from different tutorial/articles, but not quite understand it. Here are what I have tried.

  1. When user login, it sends username/password to a separated API server (ex. new project that handles backend stuff), the server will respond with the access-token, then in Next.js project, I set the cookie with that received token. In Next.js project, protected routes will be wrapped with a withAuth hoc, that will check for the token in a cookie. The problem with this approach is that it is vulnerable to XSS because the cookie has no httpOnly flag.

  2. This is similar to 1.) but using localStorage, the problem is access-token could not be sent to the server on the first request. (This one I'm not sure, but in my understanding, in every HTTP request, I must stick my access-token manually, so what about requests that I have no control? ex. first request or using <a> tag).

  3. I wrote authentication backend inside Next.js server (custom express server). When user login, the server will validate it and then set an httpOnly cookie. Then the problem is, with client-side routing (go to URL using Next.js Router), it could not check for token. For example, if a page is wrapped with withAuth hoc, but it cannot access the token inside cookies with javascript.

And I've seen a lot of people, in getInitialProps of the protected route, they only check for existence token in cookie / localStorage, then what if the token is being revoked or blacklisted, how do they handle it because they did not send the token to the server? Or do I have to send the token to the server in every client-side page changing?

3
  • Bunch of examples including JWT, OAuth, etc. towards the end of this thread. – tlm Sep 11 '18 at 1:33
  • See stackoverflow.com/questions/51967734/… – jolvera Jan 11 '19 at 20:32
  • Posting as a comment as I'm a maintainer of this project so might be inappropriate for an answer (especially as it not an explanation), but you might want to check out next-auth.js.org as it supports JWT and/or database based authentication with OAuth providers and email very easily, in a secure way, resolving some of the issues described. – Iain Collins Jun 12 '20 at 8:51
27

Since we are on quarantine I have enough time to answer this question. It will be a long answer.

Next.js uses the App component to initialize the pages. _app page is responsible for rendering our pages. We authenticate users on _app.js because anything that we return from getInitialProps can be accessed by all of the other pages. We authenticate user here, authentication decision will be passed to pages, from pages to header, so each page can decide if the user is authenticated or not. (Note that it could be done with redux without prop drilling but it would make the answer more complex)

  static async getInitialProps({ Component, router, ctx }) {
    let pageProps = {};
    const user = process.browser
      ? await auth0.clientAuth()
      : await auth0.serverAuth(ctx.req); // I explain down below

    //this will be sent to all the components
    const auth = { user, isAuthenticated: !!user };
    if (Component.getInitialProps) {
      pageProps = await Component.getInitialProps(ctx);
    }

    return { pageProps, auth };
  }

  render() {
    const { Component, pageProps, auth } = this.props;
    return <Component {...pageProps} auth={auth} />;
  }
}

If we are on the browser and need to check if a user is authenticated, we just retrieve the cookie from the browser, which is easy. But we always have to verify the token. It is the same process used by browser and server. I will explain down below. But if we are on the server. we have no access to the cookies in the browser. But we can read from the "req" object because cookies are attached to the req.header.cookie. this is how we access to cookies on the server.

async serverAuth(req) {
    // console.log(req.headers.cookie) to check
    if (req.headers.cookie) {
      const token = getCookieFromReq(req, "jwt");
      const verifiedToken = await this.verifyToken(token);
      return verifiedToken;
    }
    return undefined;
  }

here is getCookieFromReq(). remember we have to think functional.

const getCookieFromReq = (req, cookieKey) => {
  const cookie = req.headers.cookie
    .split(";")
    .find((c) => c.trim().startsWith(`${cookieKey}=`));

  if (!cookie) return undefined;
  return cookie.split("=")[1];
};

Once we get the cookie, we have to decode it, extract the expiration time to see if it is valid or not. this part is easy. Another thing we have to check is if the signature of the jwt is valid. Symmetric or asymmetric algorithms are used to sign the jwt. You have to use private keys to validate the signature of symmetric algorithms. RS256 is the default asymmetric algorithms for APIs. Servers that use RS256, provide you with a link to get jwt to use the keys to validate the signature. You can either use [jwks-rsa][1] or you can do on your own. You have to create a certificate and then verify if the token is valid.

Assume that our user authenticated now. You said, "And I've seen a lot of people, in getInitialProps of the protected route, they only check for existence token in cookie / localStorage,". We use protected routes to give access only to the authorized users. In order to access those routes, users have to show their jwt tokens and express.js uses middlewares to check if the user's token is valid. Since you have seen a lot of examples, I will skip this part.

"then what if the token is being revoked or blacklisted, how do they handle it because they did not send the token to the server? Or do I have to send the token to a server in every client-side page changing?"

with verifying token process we are 100% sure if the token is valid or not. When a client asks the server to access some secret data, the client has to send the token to the server. Imagine when you mount the component, component asks the server to get some data from the protected routes. The server will extract the req object, take the jwt and use it to fetch data from the protected routes. Implementation of the fetching data for browser and server are different. And if the browser makes a request, it just needs the relative path but the server needs an absolute path. As you should know fetching data is done getInitialProps() of the component and this function executed on both client and server. here is how you should implement it. I just attached the getInitialProps() part.

MyComponent.getInitialProps = async (ctx) => {
  const another = await getSecretData(ctx.req);
 //reuslt of fetching data is passed to component as props
  return { superValue: another };
};



    const getCookieFromReq = (req, cookieKey) => {
      const cookie = req.headers.cookie
        .split(";")
        .find((c) => c.trim().startsWith(`${cookieKey}=`));

      if (!cookie) return undefined;
      return cookie.split("=")[1];
    };

   
    const setAuthHeader = (req) => {
      const token = req ? getCookieFromReq(req, "jwt") : Cookies.getJSON("jwt");

      if (token) {
        return {
          headers: { authorization: `Bearer ${token}` },
        };
      }
      return undefined;
    };

    
    export const getSecretData = async (req) => {
      const url = req ? "http://localhost:3000/api/v1/secret" : "/api/v1/secret";
      return await axios.get(url, setAuthHeader(req)).then((res) => res.data);
    };



  [1]: https://www.npmjs.com/package/jwks-rsa
2
  • 1
    Long live quarantine and thanks! Life saver! I didn't know I could access the Component in _app.js in getInitialProps(). For my use case, I needed to pass the auth down to the components in case their API requests to another server needed token access: pageProps = await Component.getInitialProps(ctx);. I definitely prefere approaches where things are done globally and can be overridden for special cases, like inheritance. – KeitelDOG May 28 '20 at 13:59
  • I meant pageProps = await Component.getInitialProps(ctx, auth);, passing the auth as second argument. – KeitelDOG May 28 '20 at 14:05
8

With the introduction of Next.JS v8, there are examples placed in the NextJS example page. The basic idea to follow is:

JWT

  • Using cookies to store the token (you may choose to further encrypt it or not)
  • Sending the cookies as authorization headers

OAuth

  • Using a third-party authentication service such as OAuth2.0
  • Using Passport
0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.