1187

What is the difference between UNION and UNION ALL?

24 Answers 24

1474

UNION removes duplicate records (where all columns in the results are the same), UNION ALL does not.

There is a performance hit when using UNION instead of UNION ALL, since the database server must do additional work to remove the duplicate rows, but usually you do not want the duplicates (especially when developing reports).

UNION Example:

SELECT 'foo' AS bar UNION SELECT 'foo' AS bar

Result:

+-----+
| bar |
+-----+
| foo |
+-----+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

UNION ALL example:

SELECT 'foo' AS bar UNION ALL SELECT 'foo' AS bar

Result:

+-----+
| bar |
+-----+
| foo |
| foo |
+-----+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)
  • 150
    The implication of this, is that union is much less performant as it must scan the result for duplicates – Matthew Watson Sep 8 '08 at 23:55
  • 15
    UNION ALL will indeed be more performant, specifically due to the lack of the distinct sort. My general practice is to use UNION ALL unless I specifically want duplicates. – Adam Caviness Jul 11 '11 at 15:51
  • 4
    Just noticed that there are a lot of good comments/answers here, so I turned on the wiki flag and added a note about performance... – Jim Harte Jul 13 '11 at 13:16
  • 197
    UNION ALL can be slower than UNION in real-world cases where the network such as the internet, is a bottleneck. The cost of transferring many duplicate rows can exceed the query execution time benefit. This has to be analyzed on a case-by-case basis. – Charles Burns Apr 4 '12 at 22:38
  • 5
    There also appears to be an impact on the default sort order. E.g. 'select 9 union select 8 union select 7' returns the results in the opposite order to 'select 9 union all select 8 union all select 7'. – Nine Tails Sep 8 '15 at 14:33
247

Both UNION and UNION ALL concatenate the result of two different SQLs. They differ in the way they handle duplicates.

  • UNION performs a DISTINCT on the result set, eliminating any duplicate rows.

  • UNION ALL does not remove duplicates, and it therefore faster than UNION.

Note: While using this commands all selected columns need to be of the same data type.

Example: If we have two tables, 1) Employee and 2) Customer

  1. Employee table data:

enter image description here

  1. Customer table data:

enter image description here

  1. UNION Example (It removes all duplicate records):

enter image description here

  1. UNION ALL Example (It just concatenate records, not eliminate duplicates, so it is faster than UNION):

enter image description here

  • 2
    "all selected columns need to be of the same data type" -- actually, things aren't that strict (not a good thing from a relational model point of view!). The SQL standard says their respective column descriptor must be the same except in name. – onedaywhen Dec 5 '16 at 9:13
42

UNION removes duplicates, whereas UNION ALL does not.

In order to remove duplicates the result set must be sorted, and this may have an impact on the performance of the UNION, depending on the volume of data being sorted, and the settings of various RDBMS parameters ( For Oracle PGA_AGGREGATE_TARGET with WORKAREA_SIZE_POLICY=AUTO or SORT_AREA_SIZE and SOR_AREA_RETAINED_SIZE if WORKAREA_SIZE_POLICY=MANUAL ).

Basically, the sort is faster if it can be carried out in memory, but the same caveat about the volume of data applies.

Of course, if you need data returned without duplicates then you must use UNION, depending on the source of your data.

I would have commented on the first post to qualify the "is much less performant" comment, but have insufficient reputation (points) to do so.

  • 1
    "In order to remove duplicates the result set must be sorted" -- maybe you have a particular vendor in mind but there are no vendor-specific tags on the question. Even if there was, could you prove that duplicates cannot be removed without sorting? – onedaywhen Dec 5 '16 at 8:51
  • 1
    distinct will "implicitly" sort the results, because removing duplicates is quicker on a sorted set. this does not mean the returned resultset is actually sorted that way, but in most cases distinct (and therefore, UNION) will internally sort the set of results. – DevilSuichiro Oct 25 '17 at 8:01
27

In ORACLE: UNION does not support BLOB (or CLOB) column types, UNION ALL does.

18

The basic difference between UNION and UNION ALL is union operation eliminates the duplicated rows from the result set but union all returns all rows after joining.

from http://zengin.wordpress.com/2007/07/31/union-vs-union-all/

12

You can avoid duplicates and still run much faster than UNION DISTINCT (which is actually same as UNION) by running query like this:

SELECT * FROM mytable WHERE a=X UNION ALL SELECT * FROM mytable WHERE b=Y AND a!=X

Notice the AND a!=X part. This is much faster then UNION.

  • 3
    This will omit rows and therefore fail to produce the expected result if a contains NULL values. Also, it still does not return the same result as a UNION - UNION also removes duplicates that are returned by the subqueries, whereas your approach won't. – Frank Schmitt Sep 19 '17 at 6:57
  • @FrankSchmitt - thanks for this answer; this bit about subqueries is exactly what I wanted to know! – Doradus Mar 15 '18 at 22:55
11

Just to add my two cents to the discussion here: one could understand the UNION operator as a pure, SET-oriented UNION - e.g. set A={2,4,6,8}, set B={1,2,3,4}, A UNION B = {1,2,3,4,6,8}

When dealing with sets, you would not want numbers 2 and 4 appearing twice, as an element either is or is not in a set.

In the world of SQL, though, you might want to see all the elements from the two sets together in one "bag" {2,4,6,8,1,2,3,4}. And for this purpose T-SQL offers the operator UNION ALL.

  • 1
    Nitpick: UNION ALL isn't "offered" by T-SQL. UNION ALL is part of the ANSI SQL standard and not specific to MS SQL Server. – Frank Schmitt Jun 22 '17 at 7:08
  • The 'Nitpick' comment could imply that you can't use "Union All" in TSQL, but you can. Of course, the comment doesn't say that, but someone reading it may infer it. – JosephDoggie Oct 24 '18 at 19:41
9

UNION
The UNION command is used to select related information from two tables, much like the JOIN command. However, when using the UNION command all selected columns need to be of the same data type. With UNION, only distinct values are selected.

UNION ALL
The UNION ALL command is equal to the UNION command, except that UNION ALL selects all values.

The difference between Union and Union all is that Union all will not eliminate duplicate rows, instead it just pulls all rows from all tables fitting your query specifics and combines them into a table.

A UNION statement effectively does a SELECT DISTINCT on the results set. If you know that all the records returned are unique from your union, use UNION ALL instead, it gives faster results.

6

Not sure that it matters which database

UNION and UNION ALL should work on all SQL Servers.

You should avoid of unnecessary UNIONs they are huge performance leak. As a rule of thumb use UNION ALL if you are not sure which to use.

  • There is no SQL Server tag on this question. I think the option that returns duplicates just because it usual perform best is the wrong advice. – onedaywhen Dec 5 '16 at 9:02
  • @onedaywhen I guess the OP used the phrase "SQL Servers" as a synonym for all RDBMSs (e.g. MySQL, PostGreSQL, Oracle, SQL Server). The wording is unfortunate, though (and of course, I might be mistaken). – Frank Schmitt Jun 22 '17 at 7:05
  • @FrankSchmitt: none of the products you listed are truly RDBMSs :) – onedaywhen Sep 14 '17 at 10:35
  • @onedaywhen care to elaborate? At least en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relational_database_management_system seems to agree with me - it explicitly mentions Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle Database and MySQL. Or are you nitpicky about the difference between Oracle and Oracle Database e.g. ? – Frank Schmitt Sep 14 '17 at 13:00
6

UNION - results in distinct records

while

UNION ALL - results in all the records including duplicates.

Both are blocking operators and hence I personally prefer using JOINS over Blocking Operators(UNION, INTERSECT, UNION ALL etc. ) anytime.

To illustrate why Union operation performs poorly in comparison to Union All checkout the following example.

CREATE TABLE #T1 (data VARCHAR(10))

INSERT INTO #T1
SELECT 'abc'
UNION ALL
SELECT 'bcd'
UNION ALL
SELECT 'cde'
UNION ALL
SELECT 'def'
UNION ALL
SELECT 'efg'


CREATE TABLE #T2 (data VARCHAR(10))

INSERT INTO #T2
SELECT 'abc'
UNION ALL
SELECT 'cde'
UNION ALL
SELECT 'efg'

enter image description here

Following are results of UNION ALL and UNION operations.

enter image description here

A UNION statement effectively does a SELECT DISTINCT on the results set. If you know that all the records returned are unique from your union, use UNION ALL instead, it gives faster results.

Using UNION results in Distinct Sort operations in the Execution Plan. Proof to prove this statement is shown below:

enter image description here

  • 3
    Everything in this answer has been said already, is too confusing to be useful (suggesting joins over unions when they do different things, giving "blocking" as a reason without explaining what you mean by that or which database servers it applies to), or is highly misleading (your percentages in your screenshot are not applicable to real actual use of UNION/UNION ALL). – user743382 Jun 21 '16 at 17:30
  • Blocking Operators are well known operators in TSQL. Everything that blocking operators do can be achieved by Joins but not vice versa. Distinct Sort operation is circled in the picture to show why union all performs better than union and also to show exactly where it exists in the execution plan. Feel free to add more data to the tables T1 and T2 to play around with the percentages! – DBA Jun 21 '16 at 18:20
  • You technically CAN produce the results of a union using a combination of joins and some really nasty cases, but it makes the query darn-near impossible to read and maintain, and in my experience it is also terrible for performance. Compare: select foo.bar from foo union select fizz.buzz from fizz against select case when foo.bar is null then fizz.buzz else foo.bar end from foo join fizz where foo.bar is null or fizz.buzz is null – Devin Lamothe Oct 17 '16 at 22:22
  • @DBA Your answer is only relevant for users of MS SQL Server. The OP never mentioned the RDBMS they're using - they might be using MySQL, PostgreSQL, Oracle, SQLite, ... – Frank Schmitt Jun 22 '17 at 7:15
5

union is used to select distinct values from two tables where as union all is used to select all values including duplicates from the tables

5

(From Microsoft SQL Server Book Online)

UNION [ALL]

Specifies that multiple result sets are to be combined and returned as a single result set.

ALL

Incorporates all rows into the results. This includes duplicates. If not specified, duplicate rows are removed.

UNION will take too long as a duplicate rows finding like DISTINCT is applied on the results.

SELECT * FROM Table1
UNION
SELECT * FROM Table2

is equivalent of:

SELECT DISTINCT * FROM (
    SELECT * FROM Table1
    UNION ALL
    SELECT * FROM Table2) DT

A side effect of applying DISTINCT over results is a sorting operation on results.

UNION ALL results will be shown as arbitrary order on results But UNION results will be shown as ORDER BY 1, 2, 3, ..., n (n = column number of Tables) applied on results. You can see this side effect when you don't have any duplicate row.

5

It is good to understand with a Venn diagramm.

here is the link to the source. There is a good description.

enter image description here

  • 3
    Your second picture suggests the two are mutually exclusive when they are not. The picture should rather show the same as the first but with the 'intersection ellipse' () shown a second time. Actually, on second thoughts, because the union all result is not a set, you should make no attempt to draw it using a Venn diagram! – onedaywhen Dec 2 '16 at 9:17
3

I add an example,

UNION, it is merging with distinct --> slower, because it need comparing (In Oracle SQL developer, choose query, press F10 to see cost analysis).

UNION ALL, it is merging without distinct --> faster.

SELECT to_date(sysdate, 'yyyy-mm-dd') FROM dual
UNION
SELECT to_date(sysdate, 'yyyy-mm-dd') FROM dual;

and

SELECT to_date(sysdate, 'yyyy-mm-dd') FROM dual
UNION ALL
SELECT to_date(sysdate, 'yyyy-mm-dd') FROM dual;
2

One more thing i would like to add-

Union:- Result set is sorted in ascending order.

Union All:- Result set is not sorted. two Query output just gets appended.

  • True ! UNION might change the order of the two sub-results. – gracchus Sep 28 '15 at 21:49
  • 5
    This is wrong. A UNION will NOT sort the result in ascending order. Any ordering you see in a result without using order by is pure coincidence. The DBMS is free to use any strategy it thinks is efficient to remove the duplicates. This might be sorting, but it could also be a hashing algorithm or something entirely different - and the strategy will change with the number of rows. A union that appears sorted with 100 rows might not be with 100.000 rows – a_horse_with_no_name Apr 27 '16 at 6:12
  • 1
    Without an ORDER BY clause on the query, the RDBMS is free to return the rows in any sequence. The observation that the result set from a UNION operation is returned "in ascending order" is only a byproduct of a "sort unique" operation performed by the database. The behavior observed is not guaranteed. So don't rely on it. If the specification is to return rows in a particular order, then add an appropriate ORDER BY clause. – spencer7593 Oct 12 '16 at 21:56
2

UNION merges the contents of two structurally-compatible tables into a single combined table.

  • Difference:

The difference between UNION and UNION ALL is that UNION will omit duplicate records whereas UNION ALL will include duplicate records.

Union Result set is sorted in ascending order whereas UNION ALL Result set is not sorted

UNION performs a DISTINCT on its Result set so it will eliminate any duplicate rows. Whereas UNION ALL won't remove duplicates and therefore it is faster than UNION.*

Note: The performance of UNION ALL will typically be better than UNION, since UNION requires the server to do the additional work of removing any duplicates. So, in cases where it is certain that there will not be any duplicates, or where having duplicates is not a problem, use of UNION ALL would be recommended for performance reasons.

  • 1
    "Union Result set is sorted in ascending order" -- Unless there is an ORDER BY, sorted results are not guaranteed. Maybe you have a particular SQL vendor in mind (even then, ascending order what exactly...?) but this question has no vendor=specific tags. – onedaywhen Dec 5 '16 at 8:49
  • "merges the contents of two structurally-compatible tables" -- I think you've stated this part really well :) – onedaywhen Dec 5 '16 at 9:19
2

Suppose that you have two table Teacher & Student

Both have 4 Column with different Name like this

Teacher - ID(int), Name(varchar(50)), Address(varchar(50)), PositionID(varchar(50))

enter image description here

Student- ID(int), Name(varchar(50)), Email(varchar(50)), PositionID(int)

enter image description here

You can apply UNION or UNION ALL for those two table which have same number of columns. But they have different name or data type.

When you apply UNION operation on 2 tables, it neglects all duplicate entries(all columns value of row in a table is same of another table). Like this

SELECT * FROM Student
UNION
SELECT * FROM Teacher

the result will be

enter image description here

When you apply UNION ALL operation on 2 tables, it returns all entries with duplicate(if there is any difference between any column value of a row in 2 tables). Like this

SELECT * FROM Student
UNION ALL
SELECT * FROM Teacher

Output enter image description here

Performance:

Obviously UNION ALL performance is better that UNION as they do additional task to remove the duplicate values. You can check that from Execution Estimated Time by press ctrl+L at MSSQL

  • Really? For a four-row result?! I would think this is a scenario where you would want to use UNION to convey intent (i.e. no duplicates) because UNION ALL is unlikely to given any real life performance gain in absolute terms. – onedaywhen Dec 5 '16 at 9:18
1

In very simple words the difference between UNION and UNION ALL is that UNION will omit duplicate records whereas UNION ALL will include duplicate records.

1

Difference Between Union Vs Union ALL In Sql

What Is Union In SQL?

The UNION operator is used to combine the result-set of two or more data set .

Each SELECT statement within UNION must have the same number of columns
The columns must also have similar data types
The columns in each SELECT statement must also be in the same order

Union Vs Union All With Example

0

UNION removes duplicate records in other hand UNION ALL does not. But one need to check the bulk of data that is going to be processed and the column and data type must be same.

since union internally uses "distinct" behavior to select the rows hence it is more costly in terms of time and performance. like

select project_id from t_project
union
select project_id from t_project_contact  

this gives me 2020 records

on other hand

select project_id from t_project
union all
select project_id from t_project_contact

gives me more than 17402 rows

on precedence perspective both has same precedence.

0

If there is no ORDER BY, a UNION ALL may bring rows back as it goes, whereas a UNION would make you wait until the very end of the query before giving you the whole result set at once. This can make a difference in a time-out situation - a UNION ALL keeps the connection alive, as it were.

So if you have a time-out issue, and there's no sorting, and duplicates aren't an issue, UNION ALL may be rather helpful.

  • But your first chunk of results could be one row duplicated many times: how useful is that?! – onedaywhen Dec 5 '16 at 9:21
0

UNION and UNION ALL used to combine two or more query results.

UNION command selects distinct and related information from two tables which will eliminates duplicate rows.

On the other hand, UNION ALL command selects all the values from both the tables, which displays all rows.

0

Important! Difference between Oracle and Mysql: Let's say that t1 t2 don't have duplicate rows between them but they have duplicate rows individual. Example: t1 has sales from 2017 and t2 from 2018

SELECT T1.YEAR, T1.PRODUCT FROM T1

UNION ALL

SELECT T2.YEAR, T2.PRODUCT FROM T2

In ORACLE UNION ALL fetches all rows from both tables. The same will occur in MySQL.

However:

SELECT T1.YEAR, T1.PRODUCT FROM T1

UNION

SELECT T2.YEAR, T2.PRODUCT FROM T2

In ORACLE, UNION fetches all rows from both tables because there are no duplicate values between t1 and t2. On the other hand in MySQL the resultset will have fewer rows because there will be duplicate rows within table t1 and also within table t2!

-2

The only difference is :

"UNION" removes duplicate rows.

"UNION ALL" does not remove duplicate rows.

  • 3
    How does this add any value compared to the accepted answer? – Nick Jan 3 at 7:26
  • ok no problem .. – Manoj Patel Jan 3 at 7:28

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