39

I have an API that sits behind an API Gateway. The API Gateway validates the bearer token before passing the request along to the API.

My API the uses the the asp.net core 2.0 native authentication and claims based authorization framework. The grunt work of getting the claims from the JWT token is done by the middleware in Microsoft.AspNetCore.Authentication.JwtBearer.

This middle ware can be configured to ignore the expiration date on the token and it is also possible to specify a local public key so it is not necessary to contact the token Authority to obtain one, but is it possible to just disable the signature validation on the token?

This would allow use of unsigned tokens for ad-hoc testing in development and prevent double validation (gateway and then API) in production.

3
  • I think if you clear the default token validator and provide your own ISecurityTokenValidator that skips any validation should do it. github.com/AzureAD/…
    – Mardoxx
    Commented Apr 20, 2018 at 5:58
  • @Eli Algranti Could find any way to do this? I'm currently stuck on the same issue. Commented Jan 30, 2019 at 0:50
  • Just to share my design. I'm using this approach as well to disable the double validation at gateway and api level. I'm using nginx+ as the api gateway, identityserver4 to generate the token. Api gateway will do the validation. This will remove the need of token validation to be done in the api level(which it can be coming from .net , java or etc) Commented Apr 1, 2019 at 3:13

4 Answers 4

83

Try this. Finally, I got it to work after so much of trying.

public TokenValidationParameters CreateTokenValidationParameters()
{
    var result = new TokenValidationParameters
    {
        ValidateIssuer = false,
        ValidIssuer = ValidIssuer,

        ValidateAudience = false,
        ValidAudience = ValidAudience,

        ValidateIssuerSigningKey = false,
        
        //IssuerSigningKey = new SymmetricSecurityKey(Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(SecretKey)),
        //comment this and add this line to fool the validation logic
        SignatureValidator = delegate(string token, TokenValidationParameters parameters)
        {
            var jwt = new JwtSecurityToken(token);

            return jwt;
        },

        RequireExpirationTime = true,
        ValidateLifetime = true,

        ClockSkew = TimeSpan.Zero,
    };

    result.RequireSignedTokens = false;

    return result;
}

Edit:

For dotnet 8 and higher you should replace var jwt = new JwtSecurityToken(token); in SignatureValidator with var jwt = new JsonWebToken(token);

As @thomas mentioned you also can use lamba:

SignatureValidator = (token, _) => new JsonWebToken(token)

More info: https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/core/compatibility/aspnet-core/8.0/securitytoken-events

12
  • 1
    I've moved on from the project so I can't validate your answer, so I'll accept it and take your word for it. Someone else may find this useful. Commented Jan 31, 2019 at 2:46
  • 2
    I struggle this for 2 days of nonstop testing and finally get it to work. woo laa... Commented Jan 31, 2019 at 3:35
  • 1
    This is also working in asp.net core 3.1, thank you for the research ... saved me a ton of time
    – achibus
    Commented Apr 21, 2020 at 15:32
  • 1
    ValidateTokenReplay = false is also needed, it's guaranteed that the User object and Claims will be initialized. Also, ValidIssuer(not a bool flag) and ValidAudience are optional for our case if we want to skip validation. Commented Jun 8, 2021 at 15:22
  • 4
    Works on .NET 5 as well. In case you only want to skip the key validation you just need to set ValidateIssuerSigningKey = false and assign the SignatureValidator = (token, _) => new JwtSecurityToken(token); Similar to what is shown in this answer.
    – Thomas
    Commented Sep 24, 2021 at 7:53
6

You may setup token validation using JwtBearerOptions.TokenValidationParameters. You could check all available parameters from the class definition.

Contains a set of parameters that are used by a Microsoft.IdentityModel.Tokens.SecurityTokenHandler when validating a Microsoft.IdentityModel.Tokens.SecurityToken.

Set All ValidateXXX and RequireXXX bool properties to false if you want to disable validation at all:

.AddJwtBearer("<authenticationScheme>", configureOptions =>
{
   options.TokenValidationParameters.ValidateActor = false;
   options.TokenValidationParameters.ValidateAudience = false;
   options.TokenValidationParameters.ValidateIssuerSigningKey = false;
   ...
}

As an another option you can override the default token signature validation by setting own implementation to JwtBearerOptions.SignatureValidator:

// Gets or sets a delegate that will be used to validate the signature of the token.
//
// Remarks:
//  If set, this delegate will be called to signature of the token, instead of normal
//  processing.
public SignatureValidator SignatureValidator { get; set; }

where SignatureValidator delegate is defined as:

public delegate SecurityToken SignatureValidator(string token, TokenValidationParameters validationParameters);
2
  • Thank you for your reply. I am already using JwtBearerOptions.TokenValidationParameters to disable expiration time validation, however I could not find good documentation for this class. Do you know which option (if any) disables checking the token signature? I was hoping to find someone who has already actually done and checked this. Commented Apr 22, 2018 at 23:46
  • @EliAlgranti have update post. You could read about each property from class definition (source code is available)
    – Set
    Commented Apr 23, 2018 at 20:19
4

I was able to clean up the code a bit, showing that we can just change the flag and with a bit more consistency when setting the flags.

services.AddAuthentication(o =>
{
    o.DefaultAuthenticateScheme = JwtBearerDefaults.AuthenticationScheme;
    o.DefaultChallengeScheme = JwtBearerDefaults.AuthenticationScheme;
})
    .AddJwtBearer(o =>
    {
        o.RequireHttpsMetadata = false;
        o.SaveToken = true;
        o.TokenValidationParameters = new TokenValidationParameters
        {
            ValidateIssuer = false,
            ValidateAudience = false,
            ValidateIssuerSigningKey = false,
            ValidateLifetime = false,
            RequireExpirationTime = false,
            RequireSignedTokens = false
        };
    });
2
  • 1
    Welcome to SO! When you post an answer and there are a few more, please expose the Pros of yours. And try to explain your code a little bit. Commented Nov 24, 2019 at 4:00
  • Hopefully, that is better @DavidGarcíaBodego. It is definitely more of a code clean up.
    – Long Mai
    Commented Nov 25, 2019 at 2:39
1

For dotnet 8 or higher you should use JsonWebToken instead JwtSecurityToken

builder.Services.AddAuthentication()
    .AddJwtBearer(opt =>
    {
        opt.TokenValidationParameters = new TokenValidationParameters()
        {
            ValidateIssuer = false,
            ValidateAudience = false,
            ValidateActor = false,
            ValidateIssuerSigningKey = false,
            ValidateLifetime = false,
            ValidateTokenReplay = false,
            SignatureValidator = (token, _) => new JsonWebToken(token)
        };
    });

For earlier versions change SignatureValidator to:

SignatureValidator = delegate(string token, TokenValidationParameters parameters)
{
    var jwt = new JwtSecurityToken(token);

    return jwt;
}

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