521

What is the fastest way to check if an object is empty or not?

Is there a faster and better way than this:

function count_obj(obj){
    var i = 0;
    for(var key in obj){
        ++i;
    }

    return i;
}
3
  • 5
    Do you want to count the properties (this is what the code is doing) or just test whether the object is empty or not (this is stated in your question)? Feb 14, 2011 at 15:59
  • 1
    Just as a recommendation of libraries that are capable of this is.js and lodash
    – Krym
    Feb 12, 2015 at 10:02
  • For utilities like this, it is recommended to use some libraries out there. You could use lodash and use something like _.isEmpty(_.keys(yourObject)). And I believe you can now import those two methods individually, and not the whole lodash library.
    – rc_dz
    Sep 28, 2018 at 18:20

23 Answers 23

636

For ECMAScript5 (not supported in all browsers yet though), you can use:

Object.keys(obj).length === 0
9
  • 122
    A more proper ES5 solution would be Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj).length == 0 because Object.keys only gets the enumerable properties. In ES5 we have the power of defining property attributes, we could have an object with non-enumerable properties and Object.keys will just return an empty array... Object.getOwnPropertyNames returns an array containing all the own properties of an object, even if they aren't enumerable. Feb 14, 2011 at 16:11
  • 10
    @CMS getOwnPropertyNames is recommended against by Crockford. According to him, this method was introduced to the language specifically for Caja (and other secure frameworks, I guess). So, there is a chance that this method is not or will not be available in certain environments. Jan 14, 2012 at 13:19
  • 11
    This answer now works in all modern browsers; definitely the best one unless you need to support IE8-.
    – Brad Koch
    Oct 10, 2014 at 14:17
  • 53
    It's quite unbelievable that Object.isEmpty() isn't part of javascript yet
    – Fractalf
    Sep 6, 2016 at 11:17
  • 4
    Semantically, I think, an object with zero enumerable properties should be considered "empty" (because unenumerable declared properties were probably meant to be "private"), so Object.keys.length is probably the right way to go.
    – Yuval A.
    Oct 19, 2017 at 10:14
464

I'm assuming that by empty you mean "has no properties of its own".

// Speed up calls to hasOwnProperty
var hasOwnProperty = Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty;

function isEmpty(obj) {

    // null and undefined are "empty"
    if (obj == null) return true;

    // Assume if it has a length property with a non-zero value
    // that that property is correct.
    if (obj.length > 0)    return false;
    if (obj.length === 0)  return true;

    // If it isn't an object at this point
    // it is empty, but it can't be anything *but* empty
    // Is it empty?  Depends on your application.
    if (typeof obj !== "object") return true;

    // Otherwise, does it have any properties of its own?
    // Note that this doesn't handle
    // toString and valueOf enumeration bugs in IE < 9
    for (var key in obj) {
        if (hasOwnProperty.call(obj, key)) return false;
    }

    return true;
}

Examples:

isEmpty(""), // true
isEmpty(33), // true (arguably could be a TypeError)
isEmpty([]), // true
isEmpty({}), // true
isEmpty({length: 0, custom_property: []}), // true

isEmpty("Hello"), // false
isEmpty([1,2,3]), // false
isEmpty({test: 1}), // false
isEmpty({length: 3, custom_property: [1,2,3]}) // false

If you only need to handle ECMAScript5 browsers, you can use Object.getOwnPropertyNames instead of the hasOwnProperty loop:

if (Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj).length > 0) return false;

This will ensure that even if the object only has non-enumerable properties isEmpty will still give you the correct results.

20
  • 5
    @SeanVieira is_empty({length: 0, custom_property: []}) returns false. I'm not sure how you intended the code to work, but I would expect it if you add: if (obj.length === 0) return true; after if (obj.length && obj.length > 0) return false; it would be correct
    – pgreen2
    Sep 14, 2012 at 0:35
  • 2
    @pgreen2 - good catch! I have updated the example to include an explicit check for 0 - thanks for helping make the answer better! Sep 14, 2012 at 1:50
  • 2
    @frequent - var hasOwnProp would probably also work :-) We're looking to avoid as many lookups as possible (in case this is called in a place where performance kind of matters [if it really matters only profiling will tell you the fastest way on each platform]). Dec 14, 2012 at 21:49
  • 1
    @yckart - you are absolutely right! I'm surprised this survived this long with that bug. Thanks for helping make the answer better! Feb 27, 2013 at 17:53
  • 1
    @NehaChoudhary - if you look at this jsFiddle you'll see the kind of situation this is designed to avoid. May 28, 2013 at 16:50
224
+50

EDIT: Note that you should probably use ES5 solution instead of this since ES5 support is widespread these days. It still works for jQuery though.


Easy and cross-browser way is by using jQuery.isEmptyObject:

if ($.isEmptyObject(obj))
{
    // do something
}

More: http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.isEmptyObject/

You need jquery though.

6
  • 54
    I'm amused that the jQuery option is the one that is "exemplary and worthy of an additional bounty", over a native ES5 solution. This answer is still useful in some cases, I suppose.
    – Brad Koch
    Oct 10, 2014 at 14:15
  • 2
    ES5 solution is not supported in all browsers (yet - at least AFAIK), so this solution makes sense if you are already using jQuery (which many sites are). Also, jQuery is a bit more efficient than Jakob's solution (not that it matters much in most cases though), as it doesn't traverse whole object before calculating the length - it returns false as soon as a key is found.
    – johndodo
    Oct 14, 2014 at 5:52
  • 1
    I doubt that's still true, if it ever was (the code is pretty standard) - but if you have an example and can validate on IE8, you should file a bug report with jQuery. They are pretty serious about that.
    – johndodo
    Nov 7, 2014 at 16:04
  • 1
    It's not cross browser since browsers do not include jQuery.
    – Pier
    Sep 6, 2016 at 23:43
  • 4
    @Pier I feel like you're being intentionally obtuse here. Cross-browser doesn't indicate that it's included in the browser itself, merely that it works universally across the major accepted browsers. Sep 23, 2016 at 1:05
101

Underscore and lodash each have a convenient isEmpty() function, if you don't mind adding an extra library.

_.isEmpty({});
5
  • 23
    Or for people who have already included underscore ;) Jun 11, 2015 at 14:32
  • 6
    Late comment: as for 2016 you can use just lodash isEmpty (you don't need to import all the lodash, you can now import just a method from it, it was divided to multiple micro-packages in npm).
    – 108adams
    Apr 15, 2016 at 6:43
  • Yeah or you could import node_modules/* and ignore any dependency you take on any plugin </sarcasm> Jan 6, 2017 at 14:29
  • The roll-your-own solutions are great for learning the intricacies of the language, but for production use it's best to leverage a robust library such as lodash. Lodash has been stress tested for both performance and corner cases. _.isEmpty() is convenient because it supports objects, arrays, just about anything.
    – pmont
    Sep 1, 2017 at 18:26
  • You can also inspect the source and see if you need to import this: github.com/lodash/lodash/blob/4.17.14/lodash.js#L11479
    – jocull
    Jul 23, 2019 at 12:50
69

Lets put this baby to bed; tested under Node, Chrome, Firefox and IE 9, it becomes evident that for most use cases:

  • (for...in...) is the fastest option to use!
  • Object.keys(obj).length is 10 times slower for empty objects
  • JSON.stringify(obj).length is always the slowest (not surprising)
  • Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj).length takes longer than Object.keys(obj).length can be much longer on some systems.

Bottom line performance wise, use:

function isEmpty(obj) { 
   for (var x in obj) { return false; }
   return true;
}

or

function isEmpty(obj) {
   for (var x in obj) { if (obj.hasOwnProperty(x))  return false; }
   return true;
}

Results under Node:

  • first result: return (Object.keys(obj).length === 0)
  • second result: for (var x in obj) { return false; }...
  • third result: for (var x in obj) { if (obj.hasOwnProperty(x)) return false; }...
  • forth result: return ('{}' === JSON.stringify(obj))

Testing for Object with 0 keys 0.00018 0.000015 0.000015 0.000324

Testing for Object with 1 keys 0.000346 0.000458 0.000577 0.000657

Testing for Object with 2 keys 0.000375 0.00046 0.000565 0.000773

Testing for Object with 3 keys 0.000406 0.000476 0.000577 0.000904

Testing for Object with 4 keys 0.000435 0.000487 0.000589 0.001031

Testing for Object with 5 keys 0.000465 0.000501 0.000604 0.001148

Testing for Object with 6 keys 0.000492 0.000511 0.000618 0.001269

Testing for Object with 7 keys 0.000528 0.000527 0.000637 0.00138

Testing for Object with 8 keys 0.000565 0.000538 0.000647 0.00159

Testing for Object with 100 keys 0.003718 0.00243 0.002535 0.01381

Testing for Object with 1000 keys 0.0337 0.0193 0.0194 0.1337

Note that if your typical use case tests a non empty object with few keys, and rarely do you get to test empty objects or objects with 10 or more keys, consider the Object.keys(obj).length option. - otherwise go with the more generic (for... in...) implementation.

Note that Firefox seem to have a faster support for Object.keys(obj).length and Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj).length, making it a better choice for any non empty Object, but still when it comes to empty objects, the (for...in...) is simply 10 times faster.

My 2 cents is that Object.keys(obj).length is a poor idea since it creates an object of keys just to count how many keys are inside, than destroys it! In order to create that object he needs to loop overt the keys... so why use it and not the (for... in...) option :)

var a = {};

function timeit(func,count) {
   if (!count) count = 100000;
   var start = Date.now();
   for (i=0;i<count;i++) func();
   var end = Date.now();
   var duration = end - start;
   console.log(duration/count)
}

function isEmpty1() {
    return (Object.keys(a).length === 0)
}
function isEmpty2() {
    for (x in a) { return false; }
    return true;
}
function isEmpty3() {
    for (x in a) { if (a.hasOwnProperty(x))  return false; }
    return true;
}
function isEmpty4() {
    return ('{}' === JSON.stringify(a))
}


for (var j=0;j<10;j++) {
   a = {}
   for (var i=0;i<j;i++) a[i] = i;
   console.log('Testing for Object with '+Object.keys(a).length+' keys')
   timeit(isEmpty1);
   timeit(isEmpty2);
   timeit(isEmpty3);
   timeit(isEmpty4);
}

a = {}
for (var i=0;i<100;i++) a[i] = i;
console.log('Testing for Object with '+Object.keys(a).length+' keys')
timeit(isEmpty1);
timeit(isEmpty2);
timeit(isEmpty3);
timeit(isEmpty4, 10000);

a = {}
for (var i=0;i<1000;i++) a[i] = i;
console.log('Testing for Object with '+Object.keys(a).length+' keys')
timeit(isEmpty1,10000);
timeit(isEmpty2,10000);
timeit(isEmpty3,10000);
timeit(isEmpty4,10000);

1
  • 1
    for (x in a) { return false; } can be a block-less single statement for statement. Meaning, you can save a stack block operation by removing the {}. Kindda, useless information. But might be noticeable with your 6-digit timing accuracy. Aug 9, 2017 at 23:38
32

Elegant way - use keys

var myEmptyObj = {};
var myFullObj = {"key":"value"};
console.log(Object.keys(myEmptyObj).length); //0
console.log(Object.keys(myFullObj).length); //1

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Object/keys

6
  • 2
    Why has no one commented on this solution? Looks good to me.
    – Vlad
    Feb 4, 2015 at 14:33
  • 1
    @Vlad This is probably not very efficient. Why ask the JS engine to extract all the keys just to find out if there are any keys Mar 18, 2015 at 20:21
  • 1
    @VictorGrazi is there any chance the engine might be storing all those keys in memory for easy reference already?
    – Aditya M P
    Apr 9, 2015 at 5:43
  • 1
    @adityamenon I would like to know the answer to that myself. Is it in the spec or does it vary between implementations? Apr 9, 2015 at 15:53
  • This is 10 times slower for empty objects than using the (for... in) option - see performance tests above.
    – davidhadas
    Dec 28, 2015 at 10:22
23
function isEmpty( o ) {
    for ( var p in o ) { 
        if ( o.hasOwnProperty( p ) ) { return false; }
    }
    return true;
}
3
  • 1
    @CMS Stupid IE :) At least IE9 corrected that. Feb 14, 2011 at 16:17
  • @ŠimeVidas: In this solution, you declare p in your for... in loop with the var keyword. If you don't do this, does p become an implied global? Just wanted to ask about something that looks like a best practice. Jan 14, 2012 at 4:43
  • 1
    @parisminton It does in the "default language". However, in strict mode (which is the recommended language), it throws a reference error (unless of course, there already exists a variable with that name in an outer scope). Therefore, you do want to put a var there. Jan 14, 2012 at 13:10
21
var x= {}
var y= {x:'hi'}
console.log(Object.keys(x).length===0)
console.log(Object.keys(y).length===0)

true
false

http://jsfiddle.net/j7ona6hz/1/

2
  • 1
    while this works, why not do a triple equals?
    – JaeGeeTee
    Mar 1, 2018 at 18:01
  • 1
    @JaeGeeTee Coercion maybe ?
    – Royi Namir
    Jun 12, 2018 at 8:11
19

Surprised to see so many weak answers on such a basic JS question... The top answer is no good too for these reasons:

  1. it generates a global variable
  2. returns true on undefined
  3. uses for...in which is extremely slow by itself
  4. function inside for...in is useless - return false without hasOwnProperty magic will work fine

In fact there's a simpler solution:

function isEmpty(value) {
    return Boolean(value && typeof value === 'object') && !Object.keys(value).length;
}
3
  • 7
    I think it's ok to return false on undefined, since undefined is not an object. Oct 27, 2014 at 21:02
  • 1
    This is 10 times slower for empty objects than using the (for... in) option - see performance tests above.
    – davidhadas
    Dec 28, 2015 at 10:22
  • In my opinion, this question isn't too basic: because "emptiness" is a very multifaceted thing in javascript - depending on what type of value we're dealing with, we have different conceptions of "emptiness". An Array is empty when it has no items. Even if I say let a = []; a.v = 'hello';, most people will agree a is "empty". But an Object is empty if it has no properties. Even if we do let o = { length: 0 };, most people will agree (I think) that o isn't empty because it has a "length" property. Aug 26, 2019 at 15:52
11

https://lodash.com/docs#isEmpty comes in pretty handy:

_.isEmpty({})   // true
_.isEmpty()     // true
_.isEmpty(null) // true
_.isEmpty("")   // true
7

How bad is this?

function(obj){
    for(var key in obj){
        return false; // not empty
    }

    return true; // empty
}
1
  • Actually - this is very good - see performance testing above...
    – davidhadas
    Dec 28, 2015 at 10:05
4

No need for a library.

function(){ //must be within a function
 var obj = {}; //the object to test

 for(var isNotEmpty in obj) //will loop through once if there is a property of some sort, then
    return alert('not empty')//what ever you are trying to do once

 return alert('empty'); //nope obj was empty do this instead;
}
4

It might be a bit hacky. You can try this.

if (JSON.stringify(data).length === 2) {
   // Do something
}

Not sure if there is any disadvantage of this method.

5
  • 2
    If data isn't an object, this could give a false positive for JSON.stringify([]) or JSON.stringify("") or JSON.stringify(42). That's all I've got though.
    – Brad Koch
    Jan 11, 2013 at 3:34
  • 4
    also, I think performance could be worse than using some other method. And JSON.stringify is not available in every browser Apr 22, 2013 at 19:46
  • +1 Excellent answer + this is blazing fast solution !!! Ignore the other comments if your application points to modern web browser engines.
    – mate64
    Feb 11, 2014 at 23:29
  • 5
    -1 An overkill for most cases. @cept0 How stringifing an object may be blazing fast?! Apr 6, 2014 at 18:38
  • 6
    If you like this solution, a tweak like this makes it more explicit. JSON.stringify({}) === "{}"
    – Mark Eric
    Feb 12, 2015 at 18:52
1

fast onliner for 'dictionary'-objects:

function isEmptyDict(d){for (var k in d) return false; return true}
2
  • 1
    I think this will have better performance: isEmpty = function(a,b){for(b in a){break}return !b};
    – iegik
    Sep 11, 2013 at 13:18
  • 1
    I do not see why break, return !b would be better than return false/return true? break and !b both require an extra 'operation'. Minor detail is that b should not be an input variable, but defined inside the function; for (var b in a)... does this, even if a is 'empty'
    – Remi
    Sep 11, 2013 at 14:58
1

You can write a fallback if Array.isArray and Object.getOwnPropertyNames is not available

XX.isEmpty = function(a){
    if(Array.isArray(a)){
        return (a.length==0);
    }
    if(!a){
        return true;
    }
    if(a instanceof Object){

        if(a instanceof Date){
            return false;
        }

        if(Object.getOwnPropertyNames(a).length == 0){
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}
1

Imagine you have the objects below:

var obj1= {};
var obj2= {test: "test"};

Don't forget we can NOT use === sign for testing an object equality as they get inheritance, so If you using ECMA 5 and upper version of javascript, the answer is easy, you can use the function below:

function isEmpty(obj) {
   //check if it's an Obj first
   var isObj = obj !== null 
   && typeof obj === 'object' 
   && Object.prototype.toString.call(obj) === '[object Object]';

   if (isObj) {
       for (var o in obj) {
           if (obj.hasOwnProperty(o)) {
               return false;
               break;
           }
       }
       return true;
   } else {
       console.error("isEmpty function only accept an Object");
   }
}

so the result as below:

isEmpty(obj1); //this returns true
isEmpty(obj2); //this returns false
isEmpty([]); // log in console: isEmpty function only accept an Object
1
funtion isEmpty(o,i)
{
    for(i in o)
    {
        return!1
    }
    return!0
}
2
  • works for my 99% cases.
    – mgttt
    May 28, 2017 at 14:13
  • 2
    The !0 and !1 are rather confusing here. Why not just simply true and false? Nov 6, 2019 at 15:02
0

here's a good way to do it

function isEmpty(obj) {
  if (Array.isArray(obj)) {
    return obj.length === 0;
  } else if (typeof obj === 'object') {
    for (var i in obj) {
      return false;
    }
    return true;
  } else {
    return !obj;
  }
}
0
var hasOwnProperty = Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty;
function isArray(a) {
    return Object.prototype.toString.call(a) === '[object Array]'
}
function isObject(a) {
    return Object.prototype.toString.call(a) === '[object Object]'
}
function isEmpty(a) {
    if (null == a || "" == a)return!0;
    if ("number" == typeof a || "string" == typeof a)return!1;
    var b = !0;
    if (isArray(a)) {
        if (!a.length)return!0;
        for (var c = 0; c < a.length; c++)isEmpty(a[c]) || (b = !1);
        return b
    }
    if (isObject(a)) {
        for (var d in a)hasOwnProperty.call(a, d) && (isEmpty(a[d]) || (b = !1));
        return b
    }
    return!0
}
0

May be you can use this decision:

var isEmpty = function(obj) {
  for (var key in obj)
    if(obj.hasOwnProperty(key))
      return false;
  return true;
}
0

I modified Sean Vieira's code to suit my needs. null and undefined don't count as object at all, and numbers, boolean values and empty strings return false.

'use strict';

// Speed up calls to hasOwnProperty
var hasOwnProperty = Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty;

var isObjectEmpty = function(obj) {
    // null and undefined are not empty
    if (obj == null) return false;
    if(obj === false) return false;
    if(obj === true) return false;
    if(obj === "") return false;

    if(typeof obj === "number") {
        return false;
    }   
    
    // Assume if it has a length property with a non-zero value
    // that that property is correct.
    if (obj.length > 0)    return false;
    if (obj.length === 0)  return true;

    // Otherwise, does it have any properties of its own?
    // Note that this doesn't handle
    // toString and valueOf enumeration bugs in IE < 9
    for (var key in obj) {
        if (hasOwnProperty.call(obj, key)) return false;
    }
    
    
    
    return true;
};

exports.isObjectEmpty = isObjectEmpty;

-1

here my solution

function isEmpty(value) {
    if(Object.prototype.toString.call(value) === '[object Array]') {
        return value.length == 0;
    } else if(value != null && typeof value === 'object') {
        return Object.getOwnPropertyNames(value).length  == 0;
    } else {
        return !(value || (value === 0));
    }
}

Chears

-2
if (Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj1).length > 0)
{
 alert('obj1 is empty!');
}
2
  • 13
    Shouldn't the logic be reversed?
    – Ja͢ck
    Jul 17, 2013 at 5:18
  • 1
    Yes, more correct would be Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj1).length < 1. Answer as written doesn't work.
    – Brad Koch
    Oct 10, 2014 at 14:20

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