I have these two bits of code that I thought should be equivalent. The first one uses the <|w> to specify a word boundary where the non-word character (or start of string) should be before H. The second example uses the <<, which should do the same thing.

my $string = 'Hamadryas perlicus';
say $string ~~ /
    <?after <|w> Hamadryas \s+ >
    (\w+)
    /;

say $string ~~ /
    <?after << Hamadryas \s+ >
    (\w+)
    /;

The first one matches but the second one doesn't:

「perlicus」
 0 => 「perlicus」
Nil

Is there some other difference in these two?

  • Well, « is left word boundary. But that only means it should work. I have changed it to the right, and it does not work either, so there must be something else at work... – jjmerelo Apr 20 at 16:43

This answer by timotimo in the IRC channel gives a hint of why that's happening that way. When you're using after, you're actually flipping the regular expression. You'll then have to flip right for left, and that will work.

use v6;

my $string = 'Hamadryas perlicus';
say $string ~~ /
    <?after  Hamadryas <|w> \s+ >
    (\w+)
    /;

say $string ~~ /
    <?after Hamadryas « \s+ >
    (\w+)
    /;

That will yield what you are looking for.

  • 6
    FWIW, I'd consider this a bug and I think rakudo should flip « and » around for you. – timotimo Apr 20 at 17:23
  • 2
    there's now a branch for nqp that'll be merged after the release (which will be in the next days unless big trouble shows up), and there's two bugs in RT for this, as well as spec tests that want flipped anchors that are todo'd for rakudo. – timotimo Apr 20 at 18:06

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