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What is the fastest algorithm to achieve the following:

1010 0000 => 0000 0101

The conversion is from MSB LSB to LSB MSB. All bits must be reversed but the hard part is that the size of the data is between 1 byte and 8 byte and I can't know it in advance.That mean I can not predict the size. The frame arrives with a byte that indicates the size of the frame. the size varies between 1 byte and 8.

closed as too broad by chux, David Bowling, Ingo Leonhardt, Eddie, John Apr 20 '18 at 17:52

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    This may help – Jabberwocky Apr 20 '18 at 14:05
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    "What is the best" Define best. Fastest? Most readable? Least ROM/RAM memory consuming? – Lundin Apr 20 '18 at 14:20
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    "best in order to get the correct result in the least time" --> use a look-up table. It would be quite large (2^64). IOWs, best in the least time is not a reasonable criteria. Programming often requires balancing competing goals. VTC as too broad/unclear for a quality answer. – chux Apr 20 '18 at 14:31
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    @Ivan In the case that the data long is 5 Byte it did not work you can try it – gerrard2461 Apr 20 '18 at 14:45
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Operations like this can be performed by incrementally moving many bits at a time using bit operations.

Example for a 32-bit integer:

uint32_t reverse(uint32_t x, size_t len)
{
    assert(len > 0 && len <= 4);
    x = ((x & 0x55555555) <<  1) | ((x & 0xAAAAAAAA) >>  1);
    x = ((x & 0x33333333) <<  2) | ((x & 0xCCCCCCCC) >>  2);
    x = ((x & 0x0F0F0F0F) <<  4) | ((x & 0xF0F0F0F0) >>  4);
    x = ((x & 0x00FF00FF) <<  8) | ((x & 0xFF00FF00) >>  8);
    x = ((x & 0x0000FFFF) << 16) | ((x & 0xFFFF0000) >> 16);
    return x >> (32 - len * 8);
}

This should probably be the fastest and cache friendly implementation.

To implement similar for a custom width integer you need to be able to construct bit mask that has "X bit over X bit set" e.g. 1 bit after 1 (every second bit), 2 after 2 etc. The rest should be self-explanatory.

You can implement other variant based on this. If you need to choose them at runtime, it might be better to just use the widest version (64-bit) all the time to avoid branching.

Note: GCC is able to recognize byte-swap operation in the last two lines before the return statement and is able to generate bswap on x86 and rev on ARM. With 64-bit CPU this make 64-bit version equivalent to the version above in speed.


Apparently you cannot post an algorithm based on common techniques without referencing some paper/book/patent this days. So I am posting a highly patented, copyrighted and in every other way protected generalized version here. Note that you should think twice before using it (because of how patented it is).

Unfortunately, assembly generated out of this code is a complete crap. Only clang is able to somehow understand what is going on and optimize it away.

The original implementation I wrote few years ago was in C++ and heavily relied on templates to help the compiler. In the end it was a horrible and complicated mess, but could generate many bit-oriented algorithms for 8, 16, 32 and 64 integers (and even more if compiler supported them). Nevertheless, this can serve as a description of the algorithm above.

This code implements reverse algorithm for 8, 16, 32, 64 bit words using single instance of a 64 bit code. Helper functions repeat, select can be used as a basic for many bit algorithms (althougth they basically generate required bit masks).

#include <assert.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

/**
 * @brief Mask with `n` bits set.
 */
static uint64_t bits(size_t n)
{
    return (((1ull << n) - 1) | (-uint64_t(n >= 64)));
}

static uint64_t do_repeat(uint64_t x, size_t w, size_t n)
{
    if (n == 0)
        return x;

    const size_t shift = w * (n - 1);
    return (x << shift) | do_repeat(x, w, n - 1);
}

/**
 * @brief Repeat pattern over 64-bit word.
 *
 * @code
 * assert(repeat(       0x1, 32) == 0x5555555555555555);
 * assert(repeat(       0x3, 16) == 0x3333333333333333);
 * assert(repeat(       0xF,  8) == 0x0F0F0F0F0F0F0F0F);
 * assert(repeat(      0xFF,  4) == 0x00FF00FF00FF00FF);
 * assert(repeat(    0xFFFF,  2) == 0x0000FFFF0000FFFF);
 * assert(repeat(0xFFFFFFFF,  1) == 0x00000000FFFFFFFF);

 * assert(repeat(       0x1, 16) == 0x1111111111111111);
 * assert(repeat(      0x12,  8) == 0x1212121212121212);
 * assert(repeat(    0x1234,  4) == 0x1234123412341234);
 * assert(repeat(0x12345678,  2) == 0x1234567812345678);
 * @endcode
 */
static uint64_t repeat(uint64_t x, size_t n)
{
    assert(n != 0);
    return do_repeat(x, 64 / n, n);
}

/**
 * @brief Selects `1 << n` bits over `1 << n` bits.
 *
 * @code
 * assert(select(0) == 0x5555555555555555);
 * assert(select(1) == 0x3333333333333333);
 * assert(select(2) == 0x0F0F0F0F0F0F0F0F);
 * assert(select(3) == 0x00FF00FF00FF00FF);
 * assert(select(4) == 0x0000FFFF0000FFFF);
 * assert(select(5) == 0x00000000FFFFFFFF);
 * @endcode
 */
static uint64_t select(size_t n)
{
    assert(n < 6);
    return repeat(bits(1 << n), 1 << (5 - n));
}

static uint64_t do_reverse(uint64_t x, size_t n)
{
    const size_t shift = (1ull << n);
    const uint64_t lo = select(n) << 0;
    const uint64_t hi = select(n) << shift;

    x = ((x & lo) << shift) | ((x & hi) >> shift);

    if (n == 0)
        return x;

    return do_reverse(x, n - 1);
}

uint64_t reverse64(uint64_t x)
{
    return do_reverse(x, 5);
}

uint32_t reverse32(uint32_t x)
{
    return do_reverse(x, 4);
}

uint16_t reverse16(uint32_t x)
{
    return do_reverse(x, 3);
}

uint8_t reverse8(uint8_t x)
{
    return do_reverse(x, 2);
}

int main()
{
    assert(repeat(       0x1, 32) == 0x5555555555555555);
    assert(repeat(       0x3, 16) == 0x3333333333333333);
    assert(repeat(       0xF,  8) == 0x0F0F0F0F0F0F0F0F);
    assert(repeat(      0xFF,  4) == 0x00FF00FF00FF00FF);
    assert(repeat(    0xFFFF,  2) == 0x0000FFFF0000FFFF);
    assert(repeat(0xFFFFFFFF,  1) == 0x00000000FFFFFFFF);

    assert(repeat(       0x1, 16) == 0x1111111111111111);
    assert(repeat(      0x12,  8) == 0x1212121212121212);
    assert(repeat(    0x1234,  4) == 0x1234123412341234);
    assert(repeat(0x12345678,  2) == 0x1234567812345678);

    assert(select(0) == 0x5555555555555555);
    assert(select(1) == 0x3333333333333333);
    assert(select(2) == 0x0F0F0F0F0F0F0F0F);
    assert(select(3) == 0x00FF00FF00FF00FF);
    assert(select(4) == 0x0000FFFF0000FFFF);
    assert(select(5) == 0x00000000FFFFFFFF);

    assert(reverse8 (              0xA5) == 0xA5);
    assert(reverse16(            0xFEA5) == 0xA57F);
    assert(reverse32(        0xFE0000A5) == 0xA500007F);
    assert(reverse64(0xFE00FE0000A500A5) == 0xA500A500007F007F);

    return 0;
}
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    Unknown number of bits it can be 5 or 195 – P__J__ Apr 20 '18 at 14:42
  • @PeterJ_01 You should have read until the end. – StaceyGirl Apr 20 '18 at 14:43
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    You might want to state your source for this algorithm. Otherwise you risk getting accused for plagiarism. – Lundin Apr 20 '18 at 14:44
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    If you say so. I just noticed that the nearly identical algorithm can be found here: stackoverflow.com/questions/746171/… – Lundin Apr 20 '18 at 14:59
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    @Ivan But from you? Where did you first publish it? Some book or paper? – Lundin Apr 20 '18 at 15:00
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Best is an arbitrary term, as you don't specify whether the amount of code or performance is your criteria.

For a 'fast' result you should just use a look up table (LUT) to reverse the bits in every byte, and then shift the bytes into the result.

// there are easy ways to generate this table instead of doing it yourself
unsigned char Reverse[256] = {
  0x00, 0x80, 0x40, 0xC0, 0x20, 0xA0, 0x60, 0xE0, 0x10, 0x90, 0x50, 0xD0, 0x30, 0xB0, 0x70, 0xF0, 
  ...
  0x0F, 0x8F, 0x4F, 0xCF, 0x2F, 0xAF, 0x6F, 0xEF, 0x1F, 0x9F, 0x5F, 0xDF, 0x3F, 0xBF, 0x7F, 0xFF
};

int last = 3-1; // last element 
unsigned char in[8] = { 0x12, 0x34, 0x56 };
unsigned char out[8];

for (int index = 0; index <= last; index++) {
    // store bytes in reverse, reverse bits in each byte using LUT
    out[ last-index] = Reverse[ in[ index] ];
}

There are a number of alternative methods to perform bit reversal on this Bit Twiddling Hacks page, if the above isn't quite satisfactory

  • It would be safer to initialize the LUT with a set of macros to avoid spurious bugs. – chqrlie Apr 20 '18 at 16:24
  • That's why I put the comment about generating the table. Also the link I included in the answer has suitable macros. – vogomatix Apr 25 '18 at 6:34
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It can be like below, check first and last bit position status, if both bit status(0 or 1) are different, toggle both.

unsigned int data = 0xa0;
for(int start = 0, end = 8*sizeof(data) - 1; start < end; start++, end--) {
        if(data>>start&1 != data>>end&1) { /*check last and 1st bit pos status */ 
                data = data ^ 1<<start;/*complimenting start bit */
                data = data ^ 1<<end;
        }
}

end = 8*sizeof(data) - 1 if input is 8 bit long or 32 bit long, it works for both.

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