In my game there is a text that outputs code based on if certain Upgrades are bought I started out coding it like this

if (UpgradeManager.Instance.HasUpgrade("basicFunction") && !UpgradeManager.Instance.HasUpgrade("basicCounter"))
{
    codeString = "protected void GainUnits(){ units += " + gains + ";}";
}
else if (UpgradeManager.Instance.HasUpgrade("basicCounter") && UpgradeManager.Instance.HasUpgrade("basicFunction"))
{
    codeString = "private timer = 20; private void Update(){ if(timer > 0){GainUnits();}" + "protected void GainUnits(){ units += " + gains + ";}";
}
else if (UpgradeManager.Instance.HasUpgrade("basicCounter") && !UpgradeManager.Instance.HasUpgrade("basicFunction"))
{
    codeString = "private timer = 20; private void Update(){ if(timer > 0){GainUnits();}" + "units += " + gains;
}
else
{
    codeString = "units += " + gains;
}

as i add more and more upgrades i realize that i have to add more and more rules on top of whats already there creating an exponential amount of work as more is added to the game

So my question is how can i optimize this to lighten the workload?

  • You could create an abstract base class or an interface to represent the upgrades, containing a method declaration like GetCodeString(string gains) you could then use instead of the if-else block – bassfader Apr 20 at 20:16
  • ive considered that but im not sure how that would look or if it would make the load lighter @bassfader – ForgedInFlame Apr 20 at 20:18
  • Would it make sense to build out this string, step by step for each upgrade? Like start with "units +=" + gain then check for BasicFunction and add the "protected void... { " + <starting string> + ");" End if.... then check for basiccounter` and add your private timer.. and anything else. The problem becomes more a problem of string manipulation, but it seems like that would be more fun to write (And could be maybe managed by breaking the string into an array, and Join it at the end or something) – JNevill Apr 20 at 20:24
  • It would make sense @JNevill but How would I make sure the string comes out in order? For example if you bought the basicFunction before you bought the basicCounter how would you ensure that the counter code is before the function code? – ForgedInFlame Apr 20 at 20:31
  • Well, your current example is not showing that order is of importance (your current code doesn't take the order into account at all - currently it looks like a simple "flag based system" to me). This all sounds a bit like you'll probably need a completely different approach... Maybe try explaining your actual requirements in a bit more detail might help (maybe also including some example inputs and their expected outputs) – bassfader Apr 20 at 20:45

You can try that approach that can be more maintainable:

    // arrange a list of bool predicates and corresponding handlers
    var policies = new KeyValuePair<Func<bool>, Action>[]
    {
        new KeyValuePair<Func<bool>, Action>(
            () => {return UpgradeManager.Instance.HasUpgrade("basicFunction") && !UpgradeManager.Instance.HasUpgrade("basicCounter");},
            () => {codeString = "protected void GainUnits(){ units += " + gains + ";}";}),
        new KeyValuePair<Func<bool>, Action>(
            () => {return UpgradeManager.Instance.HasUpgrade("basicCounter") && UpgradeManager.Instance.HasUpgrade("basicFunction");},
            () => {codeString = "private timer = 20; private void Update(){ if(timer > 0){GainUnits();}" + "protected void GainUnits(){ units += " + gains + ";}";}),
        new KeyValuePair<Func<bool>, Action>(
            () => {return UpgradeManager.Instance.HasUpgrade("basicCounter") && !UpgradeManager.Instance.HasUpgrade("basicFunction");},
            () => {codeString = "private timer = 20; private void Update(){ if(timer > 0){GainUnits();}" + "units += " + gains;}),
        new KeyValuePair<Func<bool>, Action>(
            () => {return true;}, // last one should be always true
            () => {codeString = "units += " + gains;}),
    };

    // now let iterate over the policies
    foreach(var policy in policies)
    {
        if (policy.Key()) // evaluate predicates one-by-one
        {
            policy.Value();
            break; // if predicated matched, do the action and break out of the loop
        }   
    }

Depending on the logic necessary, you can employ different containers (that can give you better performance or flexibility, etc.)

  • Can you provide the c# counter to this? – ForgedInFlame Apr 21 at 1:52
  • C# counter? Sorry, I don't get the question. – Yury Schkatula Apr 21 at 12:54
  • The example you gave is in Js is it not? – ForgedInFlame Apr 21 at 15:18
  • The example above is 100% pure C# code. Lambdas and all this staff. – Yury Schkatula Apr 21 at 22:29
  • perhaps explain the code a bit better im not sure i understand much of whats going on in your code it actualy seems like more work then my current code – ForgedInFlame Apr 21 at 23:49
else if (UpgradeManager.Instance.HasUpgrade("basicCounter") && !UpgradeManager.Instance.HasUpgrade("basicFunction"))
{
    codeString = "private timer = 20; private void Update(){ if(timer > 0){GainUnits();}" + "units += " + gains;
}

Doesn't look like valid code there. I assume you want to increment it directly in the if-block, like this?

"if(timer > 0){ units += " + gains + "; }"

You can start by isolating what part of code that each flag modifies:

  • basicCounter: adds timer and implements Update() that increments units
  • basicFunction: encapsulates how units is incremented

With that in mind, it is easier to deconstruct the code:

  • increasing units:

    GainUnits();            // if basicFunction
    units += __GAINS__;     // if !basicFunction
    
  • counter:

    private timer = 20;
    
    private void Update() {
    if(timer > 0) {
        /* use the code from <increasing units> */
    }
    }
    
  • core implementation:

    /* use code from <counter> */          // if basicCounter
    /* use code from <increasing units> */ // if !basicCounter
    

And, putting it back together:

string GenerateCode()
{
    return string.Join("\n", GetImplementationCode());
}

IEnumerable<string> GetImplementationCode()
{
    return UpgradeManager.Instance.HasUpgrade("basicCounter")
        ? GetCounterCode()
        : GetIncreaseUnitsCode();
}
IEnumerable<string> GetCounterCode()
{
    yield return "private timer = 20;";

    yield return "private void Update() {";
    yield return "if(timer > 0) {";

    foreach (var loc in GetIncreaseUnitsCode())
    {
        yield return loc;
    }

    yield return "}";
    yield return "}";
}
IEnumerable<string> GetIncreaseUnitsCode()
{
    if (UpgradeManager.Instance.HasUpgrade("basicFunction"))
    {
        yield return "GainUnits();";
    }
    else
    {
        var gains = /* insert logics here */;
        yield return $"units += {gains};";
    }
}

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