67

Is there a way to print a spinning cursor in a terminal using Python?

17 Answers 17

74

Something like this, assuming your terminal handles \b

import sys
import time

def spinning_cursor():
    while True:
        for cursor in '|/-\\':
            yield cursor

spinner = spinning_cursor()
for _ in range(50):
    sys.stdout.write(next(spinner))
    sys.stdout.flush()
    time.sleep(0.1)
    sys.stdout.write('\b')
| improve this answer | |
  • 13
    You might want to use spinner = itertools.cycle(['-', '/', '|', '\\']) instead of creating a generator function (less verbose and more reuse) as shown here – Damien Dec 3 '14 at 13:58
  • 7
    Note that with Python 3, spinner.next() is replaced by next(spinner); see stackoverflow.com/a/1073582/5025060. – CODE-REaD Apr 26 '16 at 4:05
44

Easy to use API (this will run the spinner in a separate thread):

import sys
import time
import threading

class Spinner:
    busy = False
    delay = 0.1

    @staticmethod
    def spinning_cursor():
        while 1: 
            for cursor in '|/-\\': yield cursor

    def __init__(self, delay=None):
        self.spinner_generator = self.spinning_cursor()
        if delay and float(delay): self.delay = delay

    def spinner_task(self):
        while self.busy:
            sys.stdout.write(next(self.spinner_generator))
            sys.stdout.flush()
            time.sleep(self.delay)
            sys.stdout.write('\b')
            sys.stdout.flush()

    def __enter__(self):
        self.busy = True
        threading.Thread(target=self.spinner_task).start()

    def __exit__(self, exception, value, tb):
        self.busy = False
        time.sleep(self.delay)
        if exception is not None:
            return False

Now use it in a with block anywhere in the code:

with Spinner():
  # ... some long-running operations
  # time.sleep(3) 
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  • 6
    this is really nice, until you hit an error in your code that isn't handled. Then you can't force it to stop. – DDuffy Dec 28 '17 at 13:19
  • float(delay) will raise if not float, should be isinstance(delay, Number), with Number from numbers. – levsa Jun 12 '19 at 12:34
  • Hey chief, I am pretty amateur with this, but this seems really nice. Can you give me an example of "with Spinner()"? I am not quite getting it, apparently. @Victor Moyseenko – Mike_Leigh Mar 17 at 11:02
36

A nice pythonic way is to use itertools.cycle:

import itertools, sys
spinner = itertools.cycle(['-', '/', '|', '\\'])
while True:
    sys.stdout.write(next(spinner))   # write the next character
    sys.stdout.flush()                # flush stdout buffer (actual character display)
    sys.stdout.write('\b')            # erase the last written char

Also, you might want to use threading to display the spinner during a long function call, as in http://www.interclasse.com/scripts/spin.php

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    As per CODE-REaD's comment in the other answer, in python 3, use next(spinner) instead of spinner.next() – Siyh Jun 18 '18 at 13:04
  • 2
    More concise to simply use spinner = itertools.cycle('-/|\\'). – martineau Oct 27 '18 at 15:59
  • 1
    @martineau More concise but arguably less understandable. – Noctis Skytower Nov 25 '19 at 15:02
  • 1
    @NoctisSkytower: Arguably. – martineau Nov 25 '19 at 15:12
  • I just updated the code according @Siyh comment – Damien Nov 27 '19 at 13:10
11

A solution:

import sys
import time

print "processing...\\",
syms = ['\\', '|', '/', '-']
bs = '\b'

for _ in range(10):
    for sym in syms:
        sys.stdout.write("\b%s" % sym)
        sys.stdout.flush()
        time.sleep(.5)

The key is to use the backspace character '\b' and flush stdout.

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4

Improved version from @Victor Moyseenko as the original version had few issues

  1. was leaving spinner's characters after spinning is complete
  2. and sometimes lead to removing following output's first character too
  3. avoids a rare race condition by putting threading.Lock() on output
  4. falls back to simpler output when no tty is available (no spinning)
import sys
import threading
import itertools
import time

class Spinner:

    def __init__(self, message, delay=0.1):
        self.spinner = itertools.cycle(['-', '/', '|', '\\'])
        self.delay = delay
        self.busy = False
        self.spinner_visible = False
        sys.stdout.write(message)

    def write_next(self):
        with self._screen_lock:
            if not self.spinner_visible:
                sys.stdout.write(next(self.spinner))
                self.spinner_visible = True
                sys.stdout.flush()

    def remove_spinner(self, cleanup=False):
        with self._screen_lock:
            if self.spinner_visible:
                sys.stdout.write('\b')
                self.spinner_visible = False
                if cleanup:
                    sys.stdout.write(' ')       # overwrite spinner with blank
                    sys.stdout.write('\r')      # move to next line
                sys.stdout.flush()

    def spinner_task(self):
        while self.busy:
            self.write_next()
            time.sleep(self.delay)
            self.remove_spinner()

    def __enter__(self):
        if sys.stdout.isatty():
            self._screen_lock = threading.Lock()
            self.busy = True
            self.thread = threading.Thread(target=self.spinner_task)
            self.thread.start()

    def __exit__(self, exception, value, tb):
        if sys.stdout.isatty():
            self.busy = False
            self.remove_spinner(cleanup=True)
        else:
            sys.stdout.write('\r')

example of usage of the Spinner class above:


with Spinner("just waiting a bit.. "):

        time.sleep(3)

uploaded code to https://github.com/Tagar/stuff/blob/master/spinner.py

| improve this answer | |
3

Sure, it's possible. It's just a question of printing the backspace character (\b) in between the four characters that would make the "cursor" look like it's spinning ( -, \, |, /).

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3

Nice, simple, and clean...

while True:
    for i in '|\\-/':
        print('\b' + i, end='')
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1

curses module. i'd have a look at the addstr() and addch() functions. Never used it though.

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1

For more advanced console manipulations, on unix you can use the curses python module, and on windows, you can use WConio which provides equivalent functionality of the curses library.

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1

Grab the awesome progressbar module - http://code.google.com/p/python-progressbar/ use RotatingMarker.

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1

I have found py-spin package on GitHub. It has many nice spinning Styles. Here are some sample about how to use, Spin1 is the \-/ style:

from __future__ import print_function

import time

from pyspin.spin import make_spin, Spin1

# Choose a spin style and the words when showing the spin.
@make_spin(Spin1, "Downloading...")
def download_video():
    time.sleep(10)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print("I'm going to download a video, and it'll cost much time.")
    download_video()
    print("Done!")
    time.sleep(0.1)

It is also possible to control the spin manualy:

from __future__ import print_function

import sys
import time

from pyspin.spin import Spin1, Spinner

# Choose a spin style.
spin = Spinner(Spin1)
# Spin it now.
for i in range(50):
    print(u"\r{0}".format(spin.next()), end="")
    sys.stdout.flush()
    time.sleep(0.1)

Other styles in the below gif.

Styles of spin in py-spin package.

| improve this answer | |
0
#!/usr/bin/env python

import sys

chars = '|/-\\'

for i in xrange(1,1000):
    for c in chars:
        sys.stdout.write(c)
        sys.stdout.write('\b')
        sys.stdout.flush()

CAVEATS: In my experience this doesn't work in all terminals. A more robust way to do this under Unix/Linux, be it more complicated is to use the curses module, which doesn't work under Windows. You probably want to slow it down some how with actual processing that is going on in the background.

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0
import sys
def DrowWaitCursor(self, counter):
    if counter % 4 == 0:
        print("/",end = "")
    elif counter % 4 == 1:
        print("-",end = "")
    elif counter % 4 == 2:
        print("\\",end = "")
    elif counter % 4 == 3:
        print("|",end = "")
    sys.stdout.flush()
    sys.stdout.write('\b') 

This can be also another solution using a function with a parameter.

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0

Here ya go - simple and clear.

import sys
import time

idx = 0
cursor = ['|','/','-','\\'] #frames of an animated cursor

while True:
    sys.stdout.write(cursor[idx])
    sys.stdout.write('\b')
    idx = idx + 1

    if idx > 3:
        idx = 0

    time.sleep(.1)
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0

Crude but simple solution:

import sys
import time
cursor = ['|','/','-','\\']
for count in range(0,1000):
  sys.stdout.write('\b{}'.format(cursor[count%4]))
  sys.stdout.flush()
  # replace time.sleep() with some logic
  time.sleep(.1)

There are obvious limitations, but again, crude.

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0

I built a generic Singleton, shared by the entire application

from itertools import cycle
import threading
import time


class Spinner:
    __default_spinner_symbols_list = ['|-----|', '|#----|', '|-#---|', '|--#--|', '|---#-|', '|----#|']

def __init__(self, spinner_symbols_list: [str] = None):
    spinner_symbols_list = spinner_symbols_list if spinner_symbols_list else Spinner.__default_spinner_symbols_list
    self.__screen_lock = threading.Event()
    self.__spinner = cycle(spinner_symbols_list)
    self.__stop_event = False
    self.__thread = None

def get_spin(self):
    return self.__spinner

def start(self, spinner_message: str):
    self.__stop_event = False
    time.sleep(0.3)

    def run_spinner(message):
        while not self.__stop_event:
            print("\r{message} {spinner}".format(message=message, spinner=next(self.__spinner)), end="")
            time.sleep(0.3)

        self.__screen_lock.set()

    self.__thread = threading.Thread(target=run_spinner, args=(spinner_message,), daemon=True)
    self.__thread.start()

def stop(self):
    self.__stop_event = True
    if self.__screen_lock.is_set():
        self.__screen_lock.wait()
        self.__screen_lock.clear()
        print("\r", end="")

    print("\r", end="")

if __name__ == '__main__':
    import time
    # Testing
    spinner = Spinner()
    spinner.start("Downloading")
    # Make actions
    time.sleep(5) # Simulate a process
    #
    spinner.stop()
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0

I propose a solution using decorators

from itertools import cycle
import functools
import threading
import time


def spinner(message, spinner_symbols: list = None):
    spinner_symbols = spinner_symbols or list("|/-\\")
    spinner_symbols = cycle(spinner_symbols)
    global spinner_event
    spinner_event = True

    def start():
        global spinner_event
        while spinner_event:
            symbol = next(spinner_symbols)
            print("\r{message} {symbol}".format(message=message, symbol=symbol), end="")
            time.sleep(0.3)

    def stop():
        global spinner_event
        spinner_event = False
        print("\r", end="")

    def external(fct):
        @functools.wraps(fct)
        def wrapper(*args):
            spinner_thread = threading.Thread(target=start, daemon=True)
            spinner_thread.start()
            result = fct(*args)
            stop()
            spinner_thread.join()

            return result

        return wrapper

    return external

Simple usage

@spinner("Downloading")
def f():
    time.sleep(10)
| improve this answer | |

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