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Trying to iterate through ASCII characters

I want to print all the A-Z characters in lowercase but I get only the first char printed.

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    for(int x = 'A'; x <= 'Z'; x++)
    {
        x = tolower(x);
        putchar(x);
    }
    return 0;
}

Output

a
3

The problem with your approach is that your are modifying the variable that is used as the running variable for the loop.

Take a look at the ASCII Table and you'll notice that the upper case letters have an integer value smaller than the lower case letters.

So in the first iteration, x is assigned to A, then you do

x = tolower(x);

which changes the value of x from A to a. The integer value of a is 97, which is greater than the integer value of Z (which is 90). When the next iteration is started x++ is executed, which make x even larger than 90, so the condition

x <= 'Z'

will be evaluated to false, hence the loop stops.

So, don't change the variable that your are using as the running variable for the loop. You can do either

for(int x = 'A'; x <= 'Z'; x++)
{
    int lower_x = tolower(x);
    putchar(lower_x);
}

or

for(int x = 'A'; x <= 'Z'; x++)
{
    putchar(tolower(x));
}

In both cases x is only modified by the loop itself and you don't run into the problem you've had.

Note that while

int main()
{
    for(int x = 'A'; x <= 'z'; x++) // Notice (x <= 'Z') > > (x <= 'z')
    {
        x = tolower(x);
        putchar(x);
    }
    return 0;
}

gives you the same results in this case, this is not in general the correct solution, because it is still modifying the x variable outside the loop-construct. The values of x will be

  • First iteration x == 'A'
  • Second iteration x == 'b'
  • Third iteration x == 'c'
  • ...

Like I said, the end result might the same, but this is only a coincidence. Image you have this task: print the values multiplied by 100 from 10 to 20

If you do

for(int x = 10; x <= 20; x++)
{
    x = x * 100;
    printf("%d\n", x);
}

You will have the same situation as before. But the solution

for(int x = 10; x <= 200; x++)
{
    x = x * 100;
    printf("%d\n", x);
}

would print completely incorrect values. Like for your problem, the correct solution would be not to modify x in the block

for(int x = 10; x <= 20; x++)
{
    printf("%d\n", x * 100);
}
2
int x = 'A'

in ASCII, x is equivalent to 65.

x <= 'Z'

We know that x = 65. Well, 'Z' is equivalent to 90

1st Iteration:

The conditional expression x <= 'Z' is the same as 65 <= 90? true.

The line

x = tolower(x);

Assigns x from 'A'(65) to 'a' with a value of (97).

So, after printing the First char
the loop increments x by 1 then iterates again and asks the same question.

2nd Iteration:

Is x <= 'Z'? == Is 98 <= 90? Well, that's false.
Therefore the loop stops and exit from your main function with 0

To fix this, You need to ask if x is in the alpha lowercase range and Not the uppercase.
Why? because as we said in the 1st iteration, x would not be uppercase any more.

Final

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    for(int x = 'A'; x <= 'z'; x++) // Notice (x <= 'Z') > > (x <= 'z')
    {
        x = tolower(x);
        putchar(x);
    }
    return 0;
}

Or we can just not change x at all

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    for(int x = 'A'; x <= 'Z'; x++) // jumps from 'A'(65) to 'B'(66) to ... in order.
    {
        putchar(tolower(x)); // the return value is returned as a parameter
    }
    return 0;
}

The return value is returned as a parameter to the function tolower() instead of assigning it to x
now the variable x won't mess up our loop and we can keep our conditions as they should be.
x is now incrementing by 1 only ( x++;) each iteration safely then it gives its new values to the functions without any problem in ASCII order (unlike the 1st method).

  • The problem I see with the for(int x = 'A'; x <= 'z'; x++) solution is that x jumps from A to b. While the result might be the same, it is only a coincidence and only works because of the way the ASCII was designed. Change the problem slightly (like I did on my answer), and you'll see that you get wrong results. For me, the only viable solution is the last one: don't alter the running variable in the code block (unless it's necessary by the algorithm). – Pablo Apr 22 '18 at 5:02
  • It does fix this problem. I know exactly what you mean but it has nothing to do with printing A-Z in lowercase since both ways that are posted in this answer would work efficiently to achieve it. by the way, If you looked at the 2nd method, It doesn't change x. So it'd jump from A to B in order. – X Stylish Apr 22 '18 at 23:31
1

Do note that the for loop

for(int x = 'A'; x <= 'Z'; x++)
{
    x = tolower(x);
    putchar(x);
}

is just syntactic sugar for a while loop - here equivalent to

{
    int x = 'A';
    while (x <= 'Z') {
        x = tolower(x);
        putchar(x);
        x ++;
    }
}

By the time it reaches the x ++, the value is 'a' i.e. 97, and after the increment, it will be 'b' i.e. 98. Since 'b' <= 'Z' (98 <= 90) is false, the iteration stops.

Many newcomers to C think for is some magical structure, as it is in some other programming languages, and that's where they go wrong.

P.s. had you written putchar(tolower(x)); your program would have worked.

  • I'm not a beginner, I just wanted to share the answer with C newbies if they got stuck as a community wiki, by the way, very nice strategy. :) – X Stylish Apr 22 '18 at 4:21

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